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  1. Erica Brindley (2013). The Polarization of the Concepts Si (Private Interest) and Gong (Public Interest) in Early Chinese Thought. Asia Major 26 (2).
    Many scholars of early China agree that the fourth century bce witnessed a surge in intellectual interest in concepts that have been dubbed the self, “subjectivity,” the private realm, and the body. As such a sphere came into greater focus in intellectual circles, so did a new discourse that evaluated what it meant to benefit or deprive the self and its related parts. The famous statement purportedly by Yang Zhu 楊朱 (or Yangzi 楊子) that claims he was not willing to (...)
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  2. Erica F. Brindley (2013). The Cosmos as Creative Mind: Spontaneous Arising, Generating, and Creating in the Heng Xian. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):189-206.
    One of the key concepts in the Heng Xian is the concept of creation, as expressed through a process of spontaneous arising and spontaneous generation. This article analyzes the mechanics of spontaneous creation in terms of the cosmogony that is prominent in the text. I also show how psychomorphic descriptions of the cosmos—associated with the process of cosmogenesis—provide an explanation for change and movement in the cosmos as well as a template for idealized human action in the world. Lastly, I (...)
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  3. Erica F. Brindley & Paul R. Goldin (2013). Guest Editors' Introduction. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):141-144.
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  4. Erica F. Brindley, Paul R. Goldin & Esther S. Klein (2013). A Philosophical Translation of the Heng Xian. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):145-151.
  5. Erica Brindley (2012). The Glory of Yue: An Annotated Translation of the Yuejue Shu – By Olivia Milburn. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):163-165.
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  6. Erica Brindley (2011). Individualism in Classical Chinese Thought. In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  7. Erica Brindley (2011). Moral Autonomy and Individual Sources of Authority in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):257-273.
  8. Erica Brindley (2009). " The Perspicuity of Ghosts and Spirits" and the Problem of Intellectual Affiliations in Early China. Journal of the American Oriental Society 129 (2):215-236.
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  9. Erica Brindley (2009). “Why Use an Ox-Cleaver to Carve a Chicken?” The Sociology of the Junzi Ideal in the Lunyu. Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 47-70.
    Central to Confucian teachings in the Analects is the ideal of self-cultivation—in particular that of the junzi 君子 (“gentleman” “nobleman”) ideal. At the same time that Confucius recommends that individuals follow such an ideal, he also places limits on who actually might attain it. By examining statements involving such terms as the junzi, the “petty man” ( xiao ren 小人), and the “masses” ( min 民, or zhong 眾), or common people, this essay highlights the sociopolitical and gender restrictions informing (...)
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  10. Erica Brindley (2008). The Philosophy of the Daodejing – by Hans-Georg Moeller. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):185–188.
  11. Erica Brindley (2007). Human Agency and the Ideal of Shang Tong (Upward Conformity) in Early Mohist Writings. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (3):409–425.
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  12. Erica F. Brindley (2006). Music and “Seeking One's Heart-Mind” in the “Xing Zi Ming Chu”. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (2):247-255.
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  13. Erica Brindley (2005). After Confucius: Studies in Early Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (4):649–653.