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  1. Erica Fudge (2014). Pets. Routledge.
    'When I play with my cat, who knows if I am not a pastime to her more than she is to me?' - Michel de Montaigne. Why do we live with pets? Is there something more to our relationship with them than simply companionship? What is it we look for in our pets and what does this say about us as human beings? In this fascinating book, Erica Fudge explores the nature of this most complex of relationships and the difficulties (...)
     
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  2. Erica Fudge (2013). Milking Other Men's Beasts. History and Theory 52 (4):13-28.
    This article takes as its point of departure a small piece of evidence: a single-line entry in a seventeenth-century Essex Sessions Roll about the theft of milk. This fragment of the legal archive and the world it offers us a glimpse of are used to explore what it might mean to take seriously the presence of animals as historical actors. The article also—and inseparably—asks us to think about the nature of that being called the human that so frequently goes without (...)
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  3. Erica Fudge (2011). Attempting Animal Histories. Society and Animals 19 (4):425-431.
  4. Erica Fudge (2011). The Human Face of Early Modern England. Angelaki 16 (1):97 - 110.
    This essay traces out the context that allowed numerous early modern thinkers to deny that animals had faces. Using early- to mid-seventeenth-century writing by, among others, John Milton, John Bulwer and Ben Jonson, it shows that faces were understood to be sites of meaning, and were thus, like gestural language and the capacity to perform a dance, possessed by humans alone. Animals, this discourse argued, have no ability to communicate meaningfully because they have no bodily control, and as such they (...)
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  5. Erica Fudge (2007). Can We Differ From, and Live on Equal Terms with, Nonhuman Animals? Thinking with Animals: New Perspectives on Anthropomorphism. Society and Animals 15 (4):401-404.
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  6. Erica Fudge (1999/2002). Perceiving Animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modern English Culture. University of Illinois Press.
    When the human understanding of beasts in the past is studied, what are revealed is not only the foundations of our own perception of animals, but humans contemplating their own status. This book argues that what is revealed in a wide range of writing from the early modern period is a recurring attempt to separate the human from the beast. Looking at the representation of the animal in the law, religious writings, literary representation, science and political ideas, what emerges is (...)
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  7. Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert & Susan Wiseman (eds.) (1999). At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies, and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Palgrave.
    What is, what was the human? This book argues that the making of the human as it is now understood implies a renogotiation of the relationship between the self and the world. The development of Renaissance technologies of difference such as mapping, colonialism and anatomy paradoxically also illuminated the similarities between human and non-human. This collection considers the borders between humans and their imagined others: animals, women, native subjects, machines. It examines border creatures (hermaphrodites, wildmen, and cyborgs) and border practices (...)
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