58 found
Sort by:
  1. Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy (2007). Framing Issues in Health Care: Do American Ideals Demand Basic Health Care and Other Social Necessities for All? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (4):261-271.
    This paper argues for the necessity of universal health care (as well as universal free education) using a different argument than most that have been made heretofore. It is not meant to conflict with but to strengthen the arguments previously made by others. Using the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence and the Preamble to the Constitution we argue that universal health care in this day and age has become a necessary condition if the ideals of life, liberty and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Erich H. Loewy (2005). Age Discrimination at its Best: Should Chronological Age Be a Prime Factour in Medical Decision Making? Health Care Analysis 13 (2):101-117.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Erich H. Loewy (2005). In Defense of Paternalism. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):445-468.
    This paper argues that we have wrongly and not for the patient’s benefit made a form of stark autonomy our highest value which allows physicians to slip out from under their basic duty which has always been to pursue a particular patient’s good. In general – I shall argue – it is the patient’s right to select his or her own goals and the physician’s duty to inform the patient of the feasibility of that goal and of the means needed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy (2005). Use and Abuse of Bioethics: Integrity and Professional Standing. Health Care Analysis 13 (1):73-86.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Erich H. Loewy (2004). Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide and Other Methods of Helping Along Death. Health Care Analysis 12 (3):181-193.
    This paper introduces a series of papers dealing with the topic of euthanasia as an introduction to a variety of attitudes by health-care professionals and philosophers interested in this issue. The lead in paper—and really the lead in idea—stresses the fact that what we are discussing concerns only a minority of people lucky enough to live in conditions of acceptable sanitation and who have access to medical care. The topic of euthanasia and PAS really has three questions: (1) is killing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Erich H. Loewy (2003). Education, Practice and Bioethics: Growing Barriers to Ethical Practice. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 11 (2):171-179.
    While Bioethics is now taught at all medical colleges in the United States as well as in other nations, and while discussions about Bioethics have become frequent in most medical journals there are increasing barriers to teaching and incorporating what has been taught into daily practice. I shall discuss some of these barriers and suggest that integrating the teaching of Bioethics throughout the curriculum after presenting some of the basic theory and methodology is the most effective way of teaching this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Erich H. Loewy (2002). Bioethics: Past, Present, and an Open Future. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (04):388-397.
    The history in which bioethics developed is well reviewed in a recent book written by Al Jonsen. This superb little volume gives a concise—even if a necessarily rather subjective—account of the development of the field. A more objective history of the contemporary development of the field cannot be expected from those who helped craft it and awaits historians of the future. What I have been asked to do here is to supply my own personal impressions of the development of this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Erich H. Loewy (2002). In Memoriam: David Thomasma. Hastings Center Report 32 (4):43.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Erich H. Loewy (2001). The Social Nexus of Healthcare. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):37.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Erich H. Loewy (2001). Who Should Receive Donor Organs? Advances in Bioethics 7:125-147.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy (2001). Bioethics at the Crossroad. Health Care Analysis 9 (4):463-476.
    Bioethics and its offspring Health-care Ethics have a variety ofuses and obligations among which and perhaps most importantly istheir social obligation. This paper raises questions as toBioethics fulfilling the necessary criteria for a profession,suggests that it can serve as a link between individual andcommunal problems, discusses the task of health-care ethics as well as ways of teaching it, lists some of the obligationsof health-care ethics professionals and discusses the dangers to and failings of these health-care professionals today. Itconcludes that we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Mark G. Kuczewski, Rosa Lynn B. Pinkus & Erich H. Loewy (2000). Book Reviews-An Ethics Casebook for Hospitals: Practical Approaches to Everyday Cases. Bioethics-Oxford 14 (2):178-180.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Erich H. Loewy (2000). Of Healthcare Professionals, Ethics, and Strikes. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (4):513-520.
    The question of whether physicians or other healthcare workers are ethically entitled to strike is troubling in that it entails a conflict in obligations. This question of a conflict of obligations (and the answer to it) has wider implications for many other workers.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Erich H. Loewy (2000). Presuming Consent, Presuming Refusal: Organ Donation and Communal Structure. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (3):297-308.
    Donating, distributing and ultimately transplantingorgans each has distinct ethical problems. In thispaper I suggest that the first ethical question is notwhat should be done but what is a fair way in whicheach of these problems can be addressed. Experts –whether these be transplant surgeons, policy analysts,political scientists or ethicists – can help guidebut cannot by themselves make such decisions. Inmaking these decisions the difference betweenidentified and non-identified lives is crucial. Isuggest that an approach in which reason is temperedby compassion (``compassionate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Erich H. Loewy (1999). Physician Assisted Dying and Death with Dignity: Missed Opportunities and Prior Neglected Conditions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):189-194.
    This paper argues that the world-wide debate about physician assisted dying is missing a golden opportunity to focus on the orchestration of the end of life. Such a process consists of far more than adequate pain control and is a skill which, like all other skills, needs to be learned and taught. The debate offers an opportunity to press for the teaching of this skill. Beyond this, the desire to assure that all can have access to palliative care makes sense (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Erich H. Loewy (1999). Health-Care Systems and Ethics: What Can We Learn? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 7 (4):309-320.
    Health care systems in different countries and cultures differ and tend toreflect the particular values and, therefore, the particular socialstructure of a given society. Each of these has ethical problems unique toitself. Some of these problems are briefly discussed. So as to have anindividual ethical problem in the context of medical care, access tomedical care needs to be assured. It is argued that individual problems arethe primary issue in societies in which there is fair access whereas theyare of lesser importance (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy (1999). Lebensunwertes Leben and the Obligation to Die: Does the Obligation to Die Rest on a Misunderstanding of Community? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 7 (1):23-36.
    In this paper the authors address the recent argument that we have an obligation to seek or actively bring about our own death when we burden others too greatly. Some of the problems with this argument and some of the practical conseqeuences of adopting such a point of view are discussed in this paper. We argue that the argument rests on an individualistic approach which sees the family being burdened as standing alone instead of seeing it as embedded in a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Erich H. Loewy (1998). Curiosity, Imagination, Compassion, Science and Ethics: Do Curiosity and Imagination Serve a Central Function? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 6 (4):286-294.
    Curiosity and imagination have been neglected in epistemology. This paper argues that the role of curiosity and imagination is central to the way we think, regardless of whether it is thinking about problems of ethics or problems of science. In our ever more materialistic society, curiosity and reason are either discouraged or narrowly channeled. I shall argue that the role of curiosity and imagination for both science and ethics is so important that nurturing them can be seen as an ethical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Erich H. Loewy (1998). Justice and Health Care Systems: What Would an Ideal Health Care System Look Like? Health Care Analysis 6 (3):185-192.
    An ‘ideal’ health care system would be unencumbered by economic considerations and provide an ample supply of well-paid health care professionals who would supply culturally appropriate optimal health care to the level desired by patients. An ‘ideal’ health care system presupposes an ‘ideal’ society in which resources for all social goods are unlimited. Changes within health care systems occur both because of changes within the system and because of changes or demands in and by the ‘exterior environment’. Social systems must (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Erich H. Loewy (1998). Of Sentiment, Caring and Anencephalics: A Response to Sytsma. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):21-34.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy (1998). Of Cultural Practices, Ethics and Education: Thoughts About Affecting Changes in Cultural Practices. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 6 (1):45-51.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Erich H. Loewy & Roberta Springer Loewy (1998). Commentary. Of Cultural Practices, Ethics and Education: Thoughts About Affecting Changes in Cultural Practices. Health Care Analysis 6 (1):45-51.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Erich H. Loewy (1997). Developing Habits and Knowing What Habits to Develop: A Look at the Role of Virtue in Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (03):347-.
    Virtue ethics attempts to identify certain commonly agreed-upon dispositions to act in certain ways, dispositions that would be accepted as ‘good’ by those affected, and to locate the goodness or badness of an act internal to the agent. Basically, virtue ethics is said to date back to Aristotle, but as Alisdair MacIntyre has pointed out, the whole idea of ‘virtue ethics’ would have been unintelligible in Greek philosophy for “a virtue was an excellence and ethics concerned excellence of character; all (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Erich H. Loewy (1997). Finding an Appropriate Ethic in a World of Moral Acquaintances. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
    This paper discusses the possibility of finding an ethic of at least partial and perhaps ever-growing content in a world not that of moral strangers (where we have nothing except our desire to live freely to unite us) and one of moral friends (in which values, goals and ways of doing things are held in common). I argue that both the world of moral strangers which Engelhardt's world view would support, as the world of moral friends which is the one (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Erich H. Loewy (1997). What Would a Socialist Health Care System Look Like? A Sketch. Health Care Analysis 5 (3):195-204.
    In this paper I argue that, since institutions must reflect the societies in which they are placed, a socialist health-care system cannot be understood unless democratic socialism—which would assure all of basic necessities of existence, full education and health-care to all members of the community—is not incompatible with a flourishing market for other products. In contrasting single with multiple tiered health care systems, I suggest that a single tiered system in which all have equal access to health care and none (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy (1997). A Dialogue on Species-Specific Rights: Humans and Animals in Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (04):435-.
  27. Erich H. Loewy (1996). Justice, Society, Physicians and Ethics Committees: Incorporating Ideas of Justice Into Patient Care Decisions. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (04):559-.
    Issues of social justice have traditionally been given short shrift by American healthcare professionals, feeling that justice at the bedside is inapplicable and possibly even misplaced. However, perhaps motivated by the realization that escalating costs and maldistribution of healthcare represent an intolerable situation, an ever-growing amount of medical literature and healthcare ethics literature is turning to considerations of justice.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Erich H. Loewy (1996). Moral Strangers, Moral Acquaintance, and Moral Friends: Connectedness and its Conditions. State University of New York Press.
    Elaborates an ethic in which beneficence on a personal and communal level has moral force; proposes the idea of an interplay between compassion and reason to help address moral problems; and sketches the conditions necessary for a democratic approach to such problems.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Erich H. Loewy (1996). Of Community, Organs and Obligations: Routine Salvage with a Twist. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    This paper makes the assumption that organ transplantation is, under some conditions at least, a proper use of communal medical resources. Proceeding from this assumption, the author: (1) sketches the history of the problem; (2) briefly examines the prevalent models of communal structure and offers an alternate version; (3) discusses notions of justice and obligation derived from these different models; (4) applies these to the practice of harvesting organs for transplantation; and then (5) offers a different process for harvesting organs (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy (1996). Exploring the Role of Religion in Medical Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (02):257-.
    From time to time medical ethicists bemoan the loss of a religious perspective in medical ethics. The discipline had its origins in the thinking of explicitly religious thinkers such as Paul Ramsey and Joseph Fletcher. Furthermore, many of those who contributed to the early development of the discipline had training in theology. One thinks of Daniel Callahan, Richard McCormick, Albert Jonsen, Sam. Banks. As the discipline becomes more and more self-reflective, with attention being paid to methodological and conditional concerns, it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Erich H. Loewy (1995). Care Ethics: A Concept in Search of a Framework. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (01):56-.
    In this paper, I want to try to put what has been termed the “care ethics” into a different perspective. While I will discuss primarily the use of that ethic or that term as it applies to the healthcare setting in general and to the deliberation of consultants or the function of committees more specifically, what I have to say is meant to be applicable to the problem of using a notion like “caring” as a fundamental precept in ethical decision (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Erich H. Loewy (1995). Compassion, Reason, and Moral Judgment. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (04):466-.
    This paper will discuss the role of compassion in ethics in general and in healthcare ethics in particular. My thesis is that compassion:1) as Rousseau pointed out, is a natural trait common to all higher animals ;2) can and does serve as one of the most important motivators and modulators of ethics in both theoretical and applied aspects;3) must be controlled by, and in turn control, reason if it is to serve its ethical as well as natural purposes; and4) as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Erich H. Loewy (1995). Kant, Health Care and Justification. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (2).
    An argument based on Kant for access to health-care for all is a most helpful addition to prior discussions. My paper argues that while such a point of view is helpful it fails to be persuasive. What is needed, in addition to a notion of the legislative will, is a viewpoint of community which sees justice as originating not merely from considerations of reason alone but from a notion of community and from a framework of common human experiences and capabilities.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Erich H. Loewy (1995). Spending More on Health Care: An Idea Whose Time is Long Past. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (3):248-250.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Erich H. Loewy (1994). Consultants and Committees: A Cooperative and Mutually Educational Enterprise. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):478-.
    It is logical that to function properly ethics committees must be properly trained, and I believe that Griener and Starch's paper in this issue of CQ is an important contribution to such a point of view and to this field. Although written from the Canadian perspective, the paper should find broad resonance in other settings. Differences between national medical settings are interesting but not critical to the point Griener and Starch make, i.e., ethics committees should be trained and should continue (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Erich H. Loewy (1994). Institutional Morality, Authority, and Ethics Committees: How Far Should Respect for Institutional Morality Go? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (04):578-.
    Virtually all persons who have had a hand in shaping the concept of ethics committees in this country accept the principle that the individuals making up the ethics committee should represent different interests, backgrounds, and viewpoints. In other words, ethics committees are intended mainly to represent the interests of the communities they serve. However, ethics committees often also serve hospitals that are religiously based and who, not unreasonably, may insist on affirming their own institutional morality and their own peculiar way (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Erich H. Loewy (1994). Limiting But Not Abandoning Treatment in Severely Mentally Impaired Patients: A Troubling Issue for Ethics Consultants and Ethics Committees. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (02):216-.
    On many occasions, care givers are faced with problems in which “drastic” types of treatment seem clearly inappropriate but “lesser” interventions still appear to be advisable, if not indeed mandatory. In the hospital setting, examples are frequent: the demented elderly patient, still very much capable of brief social interactions and still able to enjoy at least limited life, who although clearly not a candidate for coronary bypass surgery is, nevertheless, a patient in whom an intercurrent pneumonia deserves treatment; the severely (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Erich H. Loewy (1994). Physicians, Friendship, and Moral Strangers: An Examination of a Relationship. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (01):52-.
    It is often said that because physicians and other healthcare professionals frequently play a critical role in determining the fate of their patients, they ought if at all possible to be their patient's friend. The relationship of necessity is intimate: physicians have knowledge of their patients' histories and of their bodies which under other circumstances would be reserved to the most intimate of friends, and physicians and patients meet under more or less critical situations. In this paper, I briefly examine (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Erich H. Loewy (1994). Teaching Medical Ethics: Is It a Waste of Time? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (02):296-.
    The paper by Dr. Myles Sheehan “Why Doctors Hate Medical Ethics” highlights some of the problems of teaching ethics to an extremely weary group of house officers who may look at ethics as a waste of time, as a requirement that must be overcome, or as “a lot of crap” Although Dr. Shee-han's paper offers a number of interesting and valuable insights, it really fails to say why residents hate the teaching of medical ethics any more than they may hate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Erich H. Loewy (1994). Of Markets, Technology, Patients and Profits. Health Care Analysis 2 (2):101-109.
    In this paper I: (1) Describe something of the present situation in the United States and briefly contrast this with the state of affairs in other nations of the industrialised world. I emphasise health care but also allude to other social conditions: health care is merely one institution of a society and, just as do its other institutions, the system of health care reflects the basic world-view of that society. (2) Sketch the world-view and the philosophy which underwrites the use (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Erich H. Loewy (1994). Philosophy and its Role in Medicine: Inaugurating a New Section. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Erich H. Loewy, Lawrence P. Ulrich, Miguel Bedolla, Robin Terrell Tucker & Melvina McCabe (1994). Furthering the Dialogue on Advance Directives and the Patient Self-Determination Act. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):405-.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Erich H. Loewy (1993). An Inquiry Into Ethics Committees' Understanding: How Does One Educate the Educators? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (04):551-.
    This paper inaugurates a new section on education, the focus of which is on education in a broader sense. The purpose is to stimulate discussion not only about techniques of education but also to initiate a dialogue concerninig more fundamental questions and issues. What are the goals of education generally and of and for ethics committees specifically? What, for an ethics committee, is “education”? What do we mean by education in this field? To function efficiently on an ethics committee, does (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Erich H. Loewy (1993). Created From Animals James Rachels. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990. 245 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (01):112-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Erich H. Loewy (1993). First or Second Class? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 12 (3):69-82.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Erich H. Loewy (1992). Healing and Killing, Harming and Not Harming: Physician Participation in Euthanasia and Capital Punishment. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):29.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Erich H. Loewy (1992). Suffering as a Consideration in Ethical Decision Making. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (02):135-.
    Erhics committees and ethics consultants are becoming more involved in helping individuals make decisions and in advising institutions and legislatures about drafting policy. The role of these committees and consultants has been acknowledged in law, and their function is generally considered salutory and helpful. Ethics consultants and committees, furthermore, play a critical role in educating students and members of the hospital community and the public at large. More over, many ethicists engage in scholarky activities to expand the boundaries of our (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Erich H. Loewy (1991). Families, Communities, and Making Medical Decisions. Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (3):150.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Erich H. Loewy & David C. Thomasma (1991). Suffering and the Beneficent Community: Beyond Libertarianism. State University of New York Press.
    A detailed multi-disciplinary analysis of Sudan in the post-colonial era with a consideration of possibilities for the future.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Erich H. Loewy (1990). Ethical and Communal Issues in Aids: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (3):173-183.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 58