Search results for 'Erick Carlson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  91
    Erick Carlson (2005). A New Time Travel Paradox Resolved. Philosophia 33 (1-4):263-273.
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  2. Allen Carlson (2000). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art, and Architecture. Routledge.
    Aesthetics and the Environment presents fresh and fascinating insights into our interpretation of the environment. Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, but Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature--in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. Carlson argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic (...)
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  3. Glenn Parsons & Allen Carlson (2012). Functional Beauty. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Glenn Parsons and Allen Carlson offer an in-depth philosophical study of the relationship between function and aesthetic value, breaking with the philosophical tradition of seeing the two as separate. The develop and defend the concept of Functional Beauty, and consider its relationship to certain views in current aesthetic thought, especially 'cognitively rich' approaches to the aesthetic appreciation of both art and nature. They argues that exploring the nature of function in the philosophy of science can help solve philosophical problems (...)
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  4.  87
    Erik Carlson (2004). Broome's Argument Against Value Incomparability. Utilitas 16 (2):220-224.
    John Broome has argued that alleged cases of value incomparability are really examples of vagueness in the betterness relation. The main premiss of his argument is ‘the collapsing principle’. I argue that this principle is dubious, and that Broome's argument is therefore unconvincing. Correspondence:c1 Erik.Carlson@filosofi.uu.se.
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  5. John W. Carlson (2012). Words of Wisdom: A Philosophical Dictionary for the Perennial Tradition. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Like their predecessors throughout the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI have emphasized the importance of philosophy in the Catholic intellectual tradition. In his encyclical _Fides et ratio _, John Paul II called on philosophers “to have the courage to recover, in the flow of an enduringly valid philosophical tradition, the range of authentic wisdom and truth.” Where the late pope spoke of an “enduringly valid tradition,” Jacques Maritain and other Thomists often have referred (...)
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  6.  1
    Licia Carlson (2009). The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections. Indiana University Press.
    In a challenge to current thinking about cognitive impairment, this book explores what it means to treat people with intellectual disabilities in an ethical manner. Reassessing philosophical views of intellectual disability, Licia Carlson shows how we can affirm the dignity and worth of intellectually disabled people first by ending comparisons to nonhuman animals and then by confronting our fears and discomforts. Carlson presents the complex history of ideas about cognitive disability, the treatment of intellectually disabled people, and social (...)
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  7.  8
    Dennis Carlson (2009). The Border Crossed Us: Education, Hospitality Politics, and the Social Construction of the “Illegal Immigrant”. Educational Theory 59 (3):259-277.
    In this essay, Dennis Carlson explores some of the implications of Derrida's “hospitality politics” in helping articulate a progressive response to a rightist cultural politics in the United States of policing national, linguistic, and other borders. He applies the concept of hospitality politics to a critical analysis of the social construction of the “problem” of “illegal immigrants” in U.S. public schools. This entails a discussion of three interrelated discourses and practices of hospitality: a universalistic discourse of philosophical and religious (...)
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  8. David Carlson (2007). A Commentary to Hegel's Science of Logic. Palgrave Macmillian.
    This book constitutes a major advancement in the study of Hegelian philosophy by offering the first full commentary on the monumental The Science of Logic , Hegel's principal work which informs every other project Hegel ever undertook. The author has devised a system for diagramming every single logical transition that Hegel makes, many of which have never before been explored in English. This reveals a startling organizational subtlety in Hegel's work which heretofore has gone unnoticed. In the course of charting (...)
     
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  9.  18
    Lauri Carlson (1994). Logic for Dialogue Games. Synthese 99 (3):377 - 415.
    The purpose of this paper is to work toward an explicit logic and semantics for a game theoretically inspired theory of action. The purpose of the logic is to explicate the conceptual machinery implicit in the dialogue-game model of rational discourse developed in Carlson (1983).A variety of ideas and techniques of modal and philosophical logic are used to define a model structure that generalizes the game theoretical notion of a game in extensive form (von Neumann and Morgenstern, 1944). Relative (...)
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  10.  26
    Lauri Carlson (1988). Quantified Hintikka-Style Epistemic Logic. Synthese 74 (2):223 - 262.
    This paper contains a formal treatment of the system of quantified epistemic logic sketched in Appendix II of Carlson (1983). Section 1 defines the syntax and recapitulates the model set rules and principles of the Appendix system. Section 2 defines a possible worlds semantics for this system, and shows that the Appendix system is complete with respect to this semantics. Section 3 extends the system by an explicit truth operatorT it is true that and considers quantification over nonexistent individuals. (...)
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  11.  26
    Arnold Berleant & Allen Carlson (eds.) (2007). The Aesthetics of Human Environments. Broadview Press.
    The Aesthetics of Human Environments is a companion volume to Carlson's and Berleant's The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. Whereas the earlier collection focused on the aesthetic appreciation of nature, The Aesthetics of Human Environments investigates philosophical and aesthetics issues that arise from our engagement with human environments ranging from rural landscapes to urban cityscapes. Our experience of public spaces such as shopping centers, theme parks, and gardens as well as the impact of our personal living spaces on the routine (...)
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  12. Allen Carlson (2005). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art and Architecture. Routledge.
    Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature, in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. He argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and that scientific understanding of nature can enhance our appreciation of it, rather than (...)
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  13. Allen Carlson (2002). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art and Architecture. Routledge.
    Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature. He argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and that scientific understanding of nature can enhance our appreciation of it, rather than denigrate it.
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  14.  8
    Dennis Carlson (2002). Leaving Safe Harbors: Toward a New Progressivism in American Education and Public Life. Routledge Falmer.
    Leaving Safe Harbors offers radical readings of conventional literature, and makes creative use of philosophy, literature, film and popular culture as it maps out a future for progressive education. Award winning author Dennis Carlson re-scripts the myths embedded in the works of Plato, Hegel, Nietzsche and Heidegger and analyzes them alongside such popular phenomena as Ridley Scott's Bladerunner and the British Punk group, The Sex Pistols. In his fluid writing style, he lucidly illustrates how these modern "myths" may serve (...)
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  15. Allen Carlson (2008). Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics. Cup.
    The roots of environmental aesthetics reach back to the ideas of eighteenth-century thinkers who found nature an ideal source of aesthetic experience. Today, having blossomed into a significant subfield of aesthetics, environmental aesthetics studies and encourages the appreciation of not just natural environments but also human-made and human-modified landscapes. _Nature and Landscape_ is an important introduction to this rapidly growing area of aesthetic understanding and appreciation. Allen Carlson begins by tracing the development of the field's historical background, and (...)
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  16. Thomas A. Carlson (2008). The Indiscrete Image: Infinitude and Creation of the Human. University of Chicago Press.
    Humanity’s creative capacity has never been more unsettling than it is at our current moment, when it has ushered us into new technological worlds that challenge the very definition of “the human.” Those anxious to safeguard the human against techno-scientific threats often appeal to religious traditions to protect the place and dignity of the human. But how well do we understand both theological tradition and today’s technological culture? In _The Indiscrete Image, _Thomas A. Carlson challenges our common ideas about (...)
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  17.  36
    Mitchell J. Neubert, Dawn S. Carlson, K. Michele Kacmar, James A. Roberts & Lawrence B. Chonko (2009). The Virtuous Influence of Ethical Leadership Behavior: Evidence From the Field. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):157 - 170.
    This study examines a moderated/mediated model of ethical leadership on follower job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. We proposed that managers have the potential to be agents of virtue or vice within organizations. Specifically, through ethical leadership behavior we argued that managers can virtuously influence perceptions of ethical climate, which in turn will positively impact organizational members' flourishing as measured by job satisfaction and affective commitment to the organization. We also hypothesized that perceptions of interactional justice would moderate (...)
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  18.  7
    Licia Carlson (2009). The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections. Indiana University Press.
    In a challenge to current thinking about cognitive impairment, this book explores what it means to treat people with intellectual disabilities in an ethical manner.
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  19. Richard P. Carlson (forthcoming). Book Review: Serve the Community of the Church: Christians as Leaders and Ministers. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (2):208-208.
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  20. Julie Sedivy, MichaelTanenhaus, Craig Chambers & Gregory Carlson (1999). Achieving Incremental Semantic Interpretation Through Contextual Representation. Cognition 71:109-47.
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  21.  92
    Richard Carlson (forthcoming). Book Review: Paul's Rhetoric in Its Contexts: The Argument of Romans. [REVIEW] Interpretation 60 (3):346-346.
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  22.  92
    Richard P. Carlson (forthcoming). Romans 8:12–17. Interpretation 58 (3):280-282.
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  23. Richard P. Carlson (forthcoming). Book Review: Paul: His Story. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (4):420-422.
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  24.  64
    Erik Carlson (2013). Vagueness, Incomparability, and the Collapsing Principle. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):449-463.
    John Broome has argued that incomparability and vagueness cannot coexist in a given betterness order. His argument essentially hinges on an assumption he calls the ‘collapsing principle’. In an earlier article I criticized this principle, but Broome has recently expressed doubts about the cogency of my criticism. Moreover, Cristian Constantinescu has defended Broome’s view from my objection. In this paper, I present further arguments against the collapsing principle, and try to show that Constantinescu’s defence of Broome’s position fails.
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  25.  9
    Åsa Carlson (2016). The Moral Sentiments in Hume's Treatise: A Classificatory Problem. Hume Studies 40 (1):73-94.
    How should the moral sentiments in David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature be classified? What kind of impressions are they? Since the answer has bearing on how to reconstruct the so-called general point of view from which moral evaluations are made, the question is not unimportant. However, there is no general agreement about where the moral sentiments fit within Hume’s taxonomy of the perceptions of the mind, since he writes several seemingly incompatible things about them. For example, at the (...)
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  26. Richard P. Carlson (forthcoming). Book Review: Romans. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (3):292-295.
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  27. Richard Carlson (forthcoming). Book Review: 'Into the Name of the Lord Jesus': Baptism in the Early Church. [REVIEW] Interpretation 53 (1):96-96.
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  28.  65
    Dawn S. Carlson & Pamela L. Perrewe (1995). Institutionalization of Organizational Ethics Through Transformational Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):829 - 838.
    Concerns regarding corporate ethics have grown steadily throughout the past decade. In order to remain competitive, many organizational leaders are faced with the challenge of creating an ethical environment within their organization. A model is presented showing the process and elements necessary for the institutionalization of organizational ethics. The transformational leadership style lends itself well to the creation of an ethical environment and is suggested as a means to facilitate the institutionalization of corporate ethics. Finally, the benefits of using transformational (...)
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  29.  7
    Allen Carlson & Arnold Berleant (eds.) (2004). The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. Broadview Press.
    The Aesthetics of Natural Environments is a collection of essays investigating philosophical and aesthetics issues that arise in our appreciation of natural environments. The introduction gives an historical and conceptual overview of the rapidly developing field of study known as environmental aesthetics. The essays consist of classic pieces as well as new contributions by some of the most prominent individuals now working in the field and range from theoretical to applied approaches. The topics covered include the nature and value of (...)
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  30.  61
    Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.) (2010). Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Through a series of essays contributed by clinicians, medical historians, and prominent moral philosophers, Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral ...
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  31. Timothy J. Carlson (2003). Ranked Partial Structures. Journal of Symbolic Logic 68 (4):1109-1144.
    The theory of ranked partial structures allows a reinterpretation of several of the standard results of model theory and first-order logic and is intended to provide a proof-theoretic method which allows for the intuitions of model theory. A version of the downward Löwenheim-Skolem theorem is central to our development. In this paper we will present the basic theory of ranked partial structures and their logic including an appropriate version of the completeness theorem.
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  32. Greg N. Carlson (1977). A Unified Analysis of the English Bare Plural. Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (3):413 - 456.
    It is argued that the English bare plural (an NP with plural head that lacks a determiner), in spite of its apparently diverse possibilities of interpretation, is optimally represented in the grammar as a unified phenomenon. The chief distinction to be dealt with is that between the generic use of the bare plural (as in Dogs bark) and its existential or indefinite plural use (as in He threw oranges at Alice). The difference between these uses is not to be accounted (...)
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  33.  74
    Erik Carlson (1999). Consequentialism, Alternatives, and Actualism. Philosophical Studies 96 (3):253-268.
  34. Donelson E. Dulany, Richard A. Carlson & G. I. Dewey (1984). A Case of Syntactical Learning and Judgment: How Conscious and How Abstract? Journal of Experimental Psychology 113:541-555.
  35.  16
    Patricia J. Carlson & Frances Burke (1998). Lessons Learned From Ethics in the Classroom: Exploring Student Growth in Flexibility, Complexity and Comprehension. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1179-1187.
    This study shows the link between teaching ethics in a college setting and the evolution of student thinking about ethical dilemmas. At the beginning of the semester, students have a rigid "black and white" conception of ethics. By the end of the semester, they are thinking more flexibly about the responsibilities of leaders in corporate ethical dilemmas, and they are able to appreciate complex situations that influence ethical behavior. The study shows that education in ethics produces more "enlightened" consumers of (...)
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  36.  32
    Erik Carlson (2016). ‘Good’ in Terms of ‘Better’. Noûs 50 (1):213-223.
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  37. Matthew Carlson (2015). Logic and the Structure of the Web of Belief. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 3 (5).
    In this paper, I examine Quine's views on the epistemology of logic. According to Quine's influential holistic account, logic is central in the “web of belief” that comprises our overall theory of the world. Because of this, revisions to logic would have devastating systematic consequences, and this explains why we are loath to make such revisions. In section1, I clarify this idea and thereby show that Quine actually takes the web of belief to have asymmetrical internal structure. This raises two (...)
     
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  38.  2
    Allen Carlson & Sheila Lintott (eds.) (2008). Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. Columbia University Press.
    The essays in the final section explicitly bring together aesthetics, ethics, and environmentalism to explore the ways in which each might affect the others.
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  39.  8
    Terry Regier & Laura A. Carlson (2001). Grounding Spatial Language in Perception: An Empirical and Computational Investigation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (2):273.
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  40.  77
    Erik Carlson (2002). Deliberation, Foreknowledge, and Morality as a Guide to Action. Erkenntnis 57 (1):71-89.
    In Section 1, I rehearse some arguments for the claim that morality should be ``action-guiding'', and try to state the conditions under which a moral theory is in fact action-guiding. I conclude that only agents who are cognitively and conatively ``ideal'' are in general able to use a moral theory as a guide to action. In Sections 2 and 3, I discuss whether moral ``actualism'' implies that morality cannot be action-guiding even for ideal agents. If actualism is true, an ideal (...)
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  41. Tim Carlson, Kenneth Kunen & Arnold W. Miller (1984). A Minimal Degree Which Collapses Ω. Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (1):298 - 300.
    We consider a well-known partial order of Prikry for producing a collapsing function of minimal degree. Assuming MA + ≠ CH, every new real constructs the collapsing map.
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  42.  70
    John P. Cullerne, F. Antonuccio, K. Avinash, D. Bar, Sarah Bell, Darrin W. Belousek, Carl M. Bender, Armando Bernui, Timothy H. Boyer & Carl E. Carlson (2000). Creutz, Michael, 487 Crowell, LB, 1123. Foundations of Physics 30 (12).
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  43.  39
    Erik Carlson (2011). The Small-Improvement Argument Rescued. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):171-174.
    Gustafsson and Espinoza have recently argued that the ‘small-improvement argument’, against completeness as a rationality requirement for preference orderings, is defective. They claim that the two main premises of the argument conflict, and hence should not both be accepted. I show that this conflict can be avoided by modifying one of the premises.
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  44.  96
    Erik Carlson (1999). The Oughts and Cans of Objective Consequentialism. Utilitas 11 (1):91-96.
    Frances Howard -Snyder has argued that objective consequentialism violates the principle that ‘ought’ implies ‘can’. In most situations, she claims, we cannot produce the best consequences available, although objective consequentialism says that we ought to do so. Here I try to show that Howard -Snyder's argument is unsound. The claim that we typically cannot produce the best consequences available is doubtful. And even if there is a sense of ‘producing the best consequences’ in which we cannot do so, objective consequentialism (...)
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  45.  66
    Erik Carlson (2010). Parity Demystified. Theoria 76 (2):119-128.
    Ruth Chang has defended a concept of "parity", implying that two items may be evaluatively comparable even though neither item is better than or equally good as the other. This article takes no stand on whether there actually are cases of parity. Its aim is only to make the hitherto somewhat obscure notion of parity more precise, by defining it in terms of the standard value relations. Given certain plausible assumptions, the suggested definiens is shown to state a necessary and (...)
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  46.  43
    Licia Carlson (2001). Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation. Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  47.  17
    Mark S. Blodgett & Patricia J. Carlson (1997). Corporate Ethics Codes: A Practical Application of Liability Prevention. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1363-1369.
    With the great increase in litigation, insurance costs, and consumer prices, both managers and businesses should take a proactive position in avoiding liability. Legal liability may attach when a duty has been breached; many actions falling into this category are also considered unethical. Since much of business liability is caused by a breach of a duty by a business to either an individual, another business, or to society, this article asserts that the practice of liability prevention is a practical business (...)
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  48. Timothy J. Carlson (1999). Ordinal Arithmetic and [Mathematical Formula]-Elementarity. Archive for Mathematical Logic 7.
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  49.  74
    Allen Carlson (1984). Nature and Positive Aesthetics. Environmental Ethics 6 (1):5-34.
    Positive aesthetics holds that the natural environment, insofar as it is unaffected by man, has only positive aesthetic qualities and value-that virgin nature is essentially beautiful. In spite of the initial implausibility of this position, it is nonetheless suggested by many individuals who have given serious thought to the natural environment and to environmental philosophy. Certain attempts to defend theposition involve claiming either that it is not implausible because our appreciation of nature is not genuinely aesthetic, or that (...)
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  50.  38
    Greg N. Carlson (1982). Generic Terms and Generic Sentences. Journal of Philosophical Logic 11 (2):145 - 181.
    Whether or not the particular view of generic sentences articulated above is correct, it is quite clear that the study of generic terms and the truth-conditions of generic sentences touches on the representation of other parts of the grammar, as well as on how the world around us is reflected in language. I would hope that the problems mentioned above will highlight the relevance of semantic analysis to other apparently distinct questions, and focus attention on the relevance of linguistic problems (...)
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