Search results for 'Erick Carlson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Erick Carlson (2005). A New Time Travel Paradox Resolved. Philosophia 33 (1-4):263-273.score: 240.0
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  2. Allen Carlson (2000). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art, and Architecture. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Aesthetics and the Environment presents fresh and fascinating insights into our interpretation of the environment. Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, but Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature--in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. Carlson argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience (...)
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  3. Erik Carlson (2004). Broome's Argument Against Value Incomparability. Utilitas 16 (2):220-224.score: 60.0
    John Broome has argued that alleged cases of value incomparability are really examples of vagueness in the betterness relation. The main premiss of his argument is ‘the collapsing principle’. I argue that this principle is dubious, and that Broome's argument is therefore unconvincing. Correspondence:c1 Erik.Carlson@filosofi.uu.se.
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  4. Lauri Carlson (1988). Quantified Hintikka-Style Epistemic Logic. Synthese 74 (2):223 - 262.score: 60.0
    This paper contains a formal treatment of the system of quantified epistemic logic sketched in Appendix II of Carlson (1983). Section 1 defines the syntax and recapitulates the model set rules and principles of the Appendix system. Section 2 defines a possible worlds semantics for this system, and shows that the Appendix system is complete with respect to this semantics. Section 3 extends the system by an explicit truth operatorT it is true that and considers quantification over nonexistent individuals. (...)
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  5. Lauri Carlson (1994). Logic for Dialogue Games. Synthese 99 (3):377 - 415.score: 60.0
    The purpose of this paper is to work toward an explicit logic and semantics for a game theoretically inspired theory of action. The purpose of the logic is to explicate the conceptual machinery implicit in the dialogue-game model of rational discourse developed in Carlson (1983).A variety of ideas and techniques of modal and philosophical logic are used to define a model structure that generalizes the game theoretical notion of a game in extensive form (von Neumann and Morgenstern, 1944). Relative (...)
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  6. Dennis Carlson (2002). Leaving Safe Harbors: Toward a New Progressivism in American Education and Public Life. Routledge Falmer.score: 60.0
    Leaving Safe Harbors offers radical readings of conventional literature, and makes creative use of philosophy, literature, film and popular culture as it maps out a future for progressive education. Award winning author Dennis Carlson re-scripts the myths embedded in the works of Plato, Hegel, Nietzsche and Heidegger and analyzes them alongside such popular phenomena as Ridley Scott's Bladerunner and the British Punk group, The Sex Pistols. In his fluid writing style, he lucidly illustrates how these modern "myths" may serve (...)
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  7. Arnold Berleant & Allen Carlson (eds.) (2007). The Aesthetics of Human Environments. Broadview Press.score: 60.0
    The Aesthetics of Human Environments is a companion volume to Carlson's and Berleant's The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. Whereas the earlier collection focused on the aesthetic appreciation of nature, The Aesthetics of Human Environments investigates philosophical and aesthetics issues that arise from our engagement with human environments ranging from rural landscapes to urban cityscapes. Our experience of public spaces such as shopping centers, theme parks, and gardens as well as the impact of our personal living spaces on the routine (...)
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  8. David Carlson (2007). A Commentary to Hegel's Science of Logic. Palgrave Macmillian.score: 60.0
    This book constitutes a major advancement in the study of Hegelian philosophy by offering the first full commentary on the monumental The Science of Logic , Hegel's principal work which informs every other project Hegel ever undertook. The author has devised a system for diagramming every single logical transition that Hegel makes, many of which have never before been explored in English. This reveals a startling organizational subtlety in Hegel's work which heretofore has gone unnoticed. In the course of charting (...)
     
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  9. Allen Carlson (1979). Appreciation and the Natural Environment. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (3):267-275.score: 30.0
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  10. Greg N. Carlson (1977). A Unified Analysis of the English Bare Plural. Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (3):413 - 456.score: 30.0
    It is argued that the English bare plural (an NP with plural head that lacks a determiner), in spite of its apparently diverse possibilities of interpretation, is optimally represented in the grammar as a unified phenomenon. The chief distinction to be dealt with is that between the generic use of the bare plural (as in Dogs bark) and its existential or indefinite plural use (as in He threw oranges at Alice). The difference between these uses is not to be accounted (...)
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  11. Åsa Carlson (2009). There Is Just One Idea of Self in Hume's Treatise. Hume Studies 35 (1-2):171-184.score: 30.0
    Hume’s mysterious words, “we must distinguish betwixt personal identity, as it regards our thought or imagination, and as it regards our passions or the concern we take in ourselves” have been the focus of a variety of different interpretations, some more creative than others. But the solution to this interpretative problem is indeed very simple, too simple to occur to most readers. What Hume has in mind is actually nothing but the different ways association works with regard to, on the (...)
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  12. Erik Carlson (1999). The Oughts and Cans of Objective Consequentialism. Utilitas 11 (01):91-96.score: 30.0
    Frances Howard-Snyder has argued that objective consequentialism violates the principle that ‘ought’ implies ‘can’. In most situations, she claims, we cannot produce the best consequences available, although objective consequentialism says that we ought to do so. Here I try to show that Howard-Snyder's argument is unsound. The claim that we typically cannot produce the best consequences available is doubtful. And even if there is a sense of ‘producing the best consequences’ in which we cannot do so, objective consequentialism (...)
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  13. Allen Carlson (1995). Nature, Aesthetic Appreciation, and Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (4):393-400.score: 30.0
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  14. Erik Carlson (2002). Deliberation, Foreknowledge, and Morality as a Guide to Action. Erkenntnis 57 (1):71-89.score: 30.0
    In Section 1, I rehearse some arguments for the claim that morality should be ``action-guiding'', and try to state the conditions under which a moral theory is in fact action-guiding. I conclude that only agents who are cognitively and conatively ``ideal'' are in general able to use a moral theory as a guide to action. In Sections 2 and 3, I discuss whether moral ``actualism'' implies that morality cannot be action-guiding even for ideal agents. If actualism is true, an ideal (...)
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  15. Erik Carlson (2003). On a New Argument for Incompatibilism. Philosophia 31 (1-2):159-164.score: 30.0
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  16. Erik Carlson (1999). Consequentialism, Alternatives, and Actualism. Philosophical Studies 96 (3):253-268.score: 30.0
  17. Allen Carlson, Environmental Aesthetics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  18. Allen Carlson (1981). Nature, Aesthetic Judgment, and Objectivity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (1):15-27.score: 30.0
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  19. Allen Carlson (2009). Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics. Columbia University Press.score: 30.0
    The development and nature of environmental aesthetics -- Aesthetic appreciation and the natural environment -- The requirements for an adequate aesthetics of nature -- Aesthetic appreciation and the human environment -- Appreciation of the human environment under different conceptions -- Aesthetic appreciation and the agricultural landscape -- What is the correct way to aesthetically appreciate landscapes?
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  20. Dawn S. Carlson & Pamela L. Perrewe (1995). Institutionalization of Organizational Ethics Through Transformational Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):829 - 838.score: 30.0
    Concerns regarding corporate ethics have grown steadily throughout the past decade. In order to remain competitive, many organizational leaders are faced with the challenge of creating an ethical environment within their organization. A model is presented showing the process and elements necessary for the institutionalization of organizational ethics. The transformational leadership style lends itself well to the creation of an ethical environment and is suggested as a means to facilitate the institutionalization of corporate ethics. Finally, the benefits of using transformational (...)
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  21. George R. Carlson (1994). Moral Realism and Wanton Cruelty. Philosophia 24 (1-2):49-56.score: 30.0
  22. Erik Carlson (2013). Vagueness, Incomparability, and the Collapsing Principle. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):449-463.score: 30.0
    John Broome has argued that incomparability and vagueness cannot coexist in a given betterness order. His argument essentially hinges on an assumption he calls the ‘collapsing principle’. In an earlier article I criticized this principle, but Broome has recently expressed doubts about the cogency of my criticism. Moreover, Cristian Constantinescu has defended Broome’s view from my objection. In this paper, I present further arguments against the collapsing principle, and try to show that Constantinescu’s defence of Broome’s position fails.
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  23. Allen Carlson (2001). On Aesthetically Appreciating Human Environments. Philosophy and Geography 4 (1):9 – 24.score: 30.0
    In this essay I attempt to move the aesthetics of human environments away from what I call the designer landscape approach. This approach to appreciating human environments involves a cluster of ideas and assumptions such as: that human environments are usefully construed as being in general ''deliberately designed'' and worthy of aesthetic consideration only in so far as they are so designed, that human environments are in this way importantly similar to works of art, and that the aesthetics of human (...)
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  24. Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.) (2010). Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 30.0
    Through a series of essays contributed by clinicians, medical historians, and prominent moral philosophers, Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral ...
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  25. Erik Carlson & Erik J. Olsson (2001). The Presumption of Nothingness. Ratio 14 (3):203–221.score: 30.0
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  26. Allen Carlson (2006). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Environmental Architecture Under Different Conceptions of Environment. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (4):77-88.score: 30.0
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  27. George R. Carlson (1979). Beliefs, Wants and Ethical Egoism. Philosophia 9 (1):9-20.score: 30.0
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  28. Allen Carlson (2006). Critical Notice: Aesthetics and Environment. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):416-427.score: 30.0
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  29. Erik Carlson (2003). Counterexamples to Principle Beta: A Response to Crisp and Warfield. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):730-737.score: 30.0
    The well-known "Consequence Argument" for the incompatibility of freedom and determinism relies on a certain rule of inference; "Principle Beta". Thomas Crisp and Ted Warfield have recently argued that all hitherto suggested counterexamples to Beta can be easily circumvented by proponents of the Consequence Argument. I present a new counterexample which, I argue, is free from the flaws Crisp and Warfield detect in earlier examples.
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  30. Allen Carlson (1984). Nature and Positive Aesthetics. Environmental Ethics 6 (1):5-34.score: 30.0
    Positive aesthetics holds that the natural environment, insofar as it is unaffected by man, has only positive aesthetic qualities and value-that virgin nature is essentially beautiful. In spite of the initial implausibility of this position, it is nonetheless suggested by many individuals who have given serious thought to the natural environment and to environmental philosophy. Certain attempts to defend theposition involve claiming either that it is not implausible because our appreciation of nature is not genuinely aesthetic, or that the position (...)
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  31. Erik Carlson (2010). Parity Demystified. Theoria 76 (2):119-128.score: 30.0
    Ruth Chang has defended a concept of "parity", implying that two items may be evaluatively comparable even though neither item is better than or equally good as the other. This article takes no stand on whether there actually are cases of parity. Its aim is only to make the hitherto somewhat obscure notion of parity more precise, by defining it in terms of the standard value relations. Given certain plausible assumptions, the suggested definiens is shown to state a necessary and (...)
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  32. Erik Carlson (1998). Van Inwagen on Determinism and Moral Responsibility. Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (2):219-226.score: 30.0
  33. Glenn Parsons & Allen Carlson (2004). New Formalism and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (4):363–376.score: 30.0
    Recently, several authors have defended a new version of formalism in the aesthetics of nature and attempted to refute earlier arguments against the doctrine. In this essay, we assess this new formalism by reconsidering the force of antiformalist arguments against both traditional formalism and new formalism. While we find that these arguments remain effective against traditional formalism, new formalism falls largely beyond their scope. We therefore provide a novel line of argument for the insignificance of the formal appreciation of nature. (...)
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  34. Erik Carlson (2011). The Small-Improvement Argument Rescued. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):171-174.score: 30.0
    Gustafsson and Espinoza have recently argued that the ‘small-improvement argument’, against completeness as a rationality requirement for preference orderings, is defective. They claim that the two main premises of the argument conflict, and hence should not both be accepted. I show that this conflict can be avoided by modifying one of the premises.
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  35. Erik Carlson (2001). Organic Unities, Non-Trade-Off, and the Additivity of Intrinsic Value. Journal of Ethics 5 (4):335-360.score: 30.0
    Whether or not intrinsic value is additively measurable is often thought to depend on the truth or falsity of G. E. Moore's principle of organic unities. I argue that the truth of this principle is, contrary to received opinion, compatible with additive measurement. However, there are other very plausible evaluative claims that are more difficult to combine with the additivity of intrinsic value. A plausible theory of the good should allow that there are certain kinds of states of affairs whose (...)
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  36. Erik Carlson (1996). The Intrinsic Value of Non-Basic States of Affairs. Philosophical Studies 85 (1):95-107.score: 30.0
  37. Greg N. Carlson (1982). Generic Terms and Generic Sentences. Journal of Philosophical Logic 11 (2):145 - 181.score: 30.0
    Whether or not the particular view of generic sentences articulated above is correct, it is quite clear that the study of generic terms and the truth-conditions of generic sentences touches on the representation of other parts of the grammar, as well as on how the world around us is reflected in language. I would hope that the problems mentioned above will highlight the relevance of semantic analysis to other apparently distinct questions, and focus attention on the relevance of linguistic problems (...)
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  38. Erik Carlson (2000). Incompatibilism and the Transfer of Power Necessity. Noûs 34 (2):277-290.score: 30.0
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  39. Carl E. Carlson & Ian J. Swanson (2000). Casimir Energy in Astrophysics: Gamma-Ray Bursts From QED Vacuum Transitions. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 30 (5):775-783.score: 30.0
    Motivated by analogous applications to sonoluminescence, neutron stars mergers are examined in the context of Schwinger's dynamical Casimir effect. When the dielectric properties of the QED vacuum are altered through the introduction of dense matter, energy shifts in the zero-point fluctuations can appear as photon bursts at gamma-ray frequencies. The amount of radiation depends upon the properties and amount of matter in motion and the suddenness of the transition. It is shown that the dynamical Casimir effect can convert sufficient energy (...)
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  40. Erik Carlson (1998). Fischer on Backtracking and Newcomb's Problem. Analysis 58 (3):229–231.score: 30.0
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  41. John P. Cullerne, F. Antonuccio, K. Avinash, D. Bar, Sarah Bell, Darrin W. Belousek, Carl M. Bender, Armando Bernui, Timothy H. Boyer & Carl E. Carlson (2000). Creutz, Michael, 487 Crowell, LB, 1123. Foundations of Physics 30 (12).score: 30.0
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  42. Mitchell J. Neubert, Dawn S. Carlson, K. Michele Kacmar, James A. Roberts & Lawrence B. Chonko (2009). The Virtuous Influence of Ethical Leadership Behavior: Evidence From the Field. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):157 - 170.score: 30.0
    This study examines a moderated/mediated model of ethical leadership on follower job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. We proposed that managers have the potential to be agents of virtue or vice within organizations. Specifically, through ethical leadership behavior we argued that managers can virtuously influence perceptions of ethical climate, which in turn will positively impact organizational members' flourishing as measured by job satisfaction and affective commitment to the organization. We also hypothesized that perceptions of interactional justice would moderate the ethical (...)
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  43. Lisa J. Carlson & Raymond Dacey (2010). Social Norms and the Traditional Deterrence Game. Synthese 176 (1):105 - 123.score: 30.0
    Bicchieri (The grammar of society: The nature and dynamics of norms, 2006, xi) presents a formal analysis of norms that answers the questions of "when, how, and to what degree" norms affect human behavior in the play of games. The purpose of this paper is to apply a variation of the Bicchieri norms analysis to generate a model of norms-based play of the traditional deterrence game (Zagare and Kilgour, Int Stud Q 37: 1-27, 1993; Morrow, Game theory for political scientists, (...)
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  44. Chad Carlson (2011). Ethics and Morality in Sport Management. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (4):457 - 459.score: 30.0
    Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, Volume 5, Issue 4, Page 457-459, November 2011.
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  45. Allen Carlson (1997). On the Aesthetic Appreciation of Japanese Gardens. British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (1):47-56.score: 30.0
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  46. Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay (2009). Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.score: 30.0
  47. Erik Carlson (1998). Mere Addition and Two Trilemmas of Population Ethics. Economics and Philosophy 14 (02):283-.score: 30.0
    A principal aim of the branch of ethics called ‘population theory’ or ‘population ethics’ is to find a plausible welfarist axiology, capable of comparing total outcomes with respect to value. This has proved an exceedingly difficult task. In this paper I shall state and discuss two ‘trilemmas’, or choices between three unappealing alternatives, which the population ethicist must face. The first trilemma is not new. It originates with Derek Parfit's well-known ‘Mere Addition Paradox’, and was first explicitly stated by Yew-Kwang (...)
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  48. Amber Carlson, A True Mode of Union: Reconsidering the Cartesian Human Being.score: 30.0
    When considering the nature of the human being, Descartes holds two main claims: he believes that the human being is a genuine unity and he also holds that it is comprised of two distinct substances, mind and body. These claims appear to be at odds with one another; it is not clear how the human being can be simultaneously two things and one thing. The details of Descartes' metaphysics of substance exacerbates this problem. Because of various theological and epistemological commitments, (...)
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  49. Licia Carlson (2001). Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation. Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.score: 30.0
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  50. Erik Carlson (2000). Aggregating Harms - Should We Kill to Avoid Headaches? Theoria 66 (3):246-255.score: 30.0
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