Search results for 'Ericka Engelstad' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Ericka Engelstad & Siri Gerrard (eds.) (2005). Challenging Situatedness: Gender, Culture and the Production of Knowledge. Eburon.
    Challenging Situatedness contends that the production of knowledge is just that—a production, and one fraught with intrinsic and often unconscious biases. In fact, to assume that scientific research is inherently objective, neutral, and therefore genderless can, quite literally, be harmful to one's health. The contributors to this volume instead argue for a situated knowledge, a research model that acknowledges different cultural realities and actively articulates context-rich ways of knowing. Drawing on international research studies—from Cameroon, Ghana, India, and Sweden, among others— (...)
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  2.  1
    Dorothy E. Vawter, David Engelstad & Jason Kallestad (2016). Palliative Care Ethics: A Case Commentary on Discontinuing Interventions at the End of Life. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (7):58-60.
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  3. P. Beilharz (2001). Stephen Turner (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Weber, Frederik Engelstad and Ragnvald Kalleberg (Eds), Social Time and Social Change-Perspectives on Sociology and History. Thesis Eleven 66:131-133.
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  4. Lisa Rofel & Jeremy Tai (2016). A Conversation with Ericka Huggins. Feminist Studies 42 (1):236.
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  5.  50
    Ericka Tucker (2016). Diversity and Felicity: Hobbes’s Science of Human Flourishing. Science Et Esprit 68 (1):35-47.
    We do not generally take the Hobbesian project to be one that encourages human flourishing. I will argue that it is; indeed, I will propose that Hobbes attempts the first modern project to provide for the possibility of the diversity of human flourishing in the civil state. To do so, I will draw on the recent work of Donald Rutherford, who takes Hobbes to be a eudaimonist in the Aristotelian tradition.
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  6. Ericka Tucker (2013). The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the superiority of (...)
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  7. Ericka Tucker (2011). Baruch Spinoza. In Deen Chatterjee (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Global Justice. Springer
  8. Ericka Tucker (2013). Community Radio in Political Theory and Development Practice. Journal of Development and Communication Studies 2 (2-3):392 - 420.
    While to political theorists in the United States ‘community radio’ may seem a quaint holdover of the democratization movements of the 1960s, community radio has been an important tool in development contexts for decades. In this paper I investigate how community radio is conceptualized within and outside of the development frame, as a solution to development problems, as part of development projects communication strategy, and as a tool for increasing democratic political participation in development projects. I want to show that (...)
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  9. Ericka Tucker (2014). Feminist Political Theory. In Gibbons Michael (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Political Thought. New York: Wiley Blackwell. Blackwell
  10. Ericka Tucker (2013). Spinoza’s Hobbesian Naturalism and Its Promise for a Feminist Theory of Power. Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 7 (13):11-23.
    This paper examines recent feminist work on Spinoza and identifies the elements of Spinoza’s philosophy that have been seen as promising for feminist naturalism. I argue that the elements of Spinoza’s work that feminist theorists have found so promising are precisely those concepts he derives from Hobbes. I argue that the misunderstanding of Hobbes as architect of the egoist model of human nature has effaced his contribution to Spinoza’s more praised conception of the human individual. Despite misconceptions, I argue that (...)
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  11.  36
    Ericka Costa & Tommaso Ramus (2012). The Italian Economia Aziendale and Catholic Social Teaching: How to Apply the Common Good Principle at the Managerial Level. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):103-116.
    The ongoing global economic and financial crisis has exposed the risks of considering market and business organizations only as instruments for creating economic wealth while paying little heed to their role in ethics and values. Catholic Social Teaching (CST) could provide a useful contribution in rethinking the role of values in business organizations and markets because CST puts forward an anthropological view that involves thinking of the marketplace as a community of persons with the aim of participating in the Common (...)
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  12. Ericka Tucker (2012). Illuminating the Radical Democratic Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Studies in Social and Political Thought 20:138-141.
  13. Ericka Tucker (2013). Affective Disorders of the State. Journal of East-West Thought 3 (2):97-120.
    The problems of contemporary states are in large part “affective disorders”; they are failures of states to properly understand and coordinate the emotions of the individuals within and in some instances outside the state. By excluding, imprisoning, and marginalizing members of their societies, states create internal enemies who ultimately enervate their own power and the possibility of peace and freedom within the state. Spinoza’s political theory, based on the notion that the best forms of state are those that coordinate the (...)
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  14.  66
    Ericka Tucker (2012). Developing Normative Consensus: How the ‘International Scene’ Reshapes the Debate Over the Internal and External Criticism of Harmful Social Practices. Journal of East-West Thought 2 (1):107-121.
    Can we ever justly critique the norms and practices of another culture? When activists or policy-makers decide that one culture’s traditional practice is harmful and needs to be eradicated, does it matter whether they are members of that culture? Given the history of imperialism, many argue that any critique of another culture’s practices must be internal. Others argue that we can appeal to a universal standard of human wellbeing to determine whether or not a particular practice is legitimate or whether (...)
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  15.  8
    Ericka Johnson (2008). Simulating Medical Patients and Practices: Bodies and the Construction of Valid Medical Simulators. Body and Society 14 (3):105-128.
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  16.  3
    C. Justice Tillman, Anthony C. Hood, Ericka R. Lawrence & K. Michele Kacmar (2015). When Birds of a Feather Flock Together: The Role of Core-Self Evaluations and Moral Intensity in the Relationship Between Network Unethicality and Unethical Choice. Ethics and Behavior 25 (6):458-481.
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  17.  13
    Ericka Tucker (2011). Idea and Ontology. An Essay in Early Modern Metaphysics of Ideas (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1):123-124.
    "Based on a true story: the early modern tale." In Idea and Ontology, Marc Hight argues that the story we have been told about early modern philosophy is false. What Hight calls the "early modern tale" tells us that beginning with Descartes and ending with Berkeley, metaphysics began its slide into the historical dustbin, replaced by epistemology as first philosophy. The categories of medieval metaphysics, substance and mode, so the story goes, could no longer serve the needs of the moderns, (...)
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  18.  1
    Ericka Johnson (forthcoming). Book Review of Most Secret Quintessence of Life. [REVIEW] Body and Society.
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  19.  2
    Ericka Johnson (2007). Book Review: The Most Secret Quintessence of Life by Chandak Sengoopta Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2006, Pp. 354, ISBN 0—226—74863—4. [REVIEW] Body and Society 13 (4):114-116.
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  20.  2
    Cecilia Åsberg & Ericka Johnson (2009). Viagra Selfhood: Pharmaceutical Advertising and the Visual Formation of Swedish Masculinity. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 17 (2):144-157.
    Using material from the Pfizer sponsored website providing health information on erectile dysfunction to potential Swedish Viagra customers (www.potenslinjen.se), this article explores the public image of masculinity in relation to sexual health and the cultural techniques for creating pharmaceutical appeal. We zoom in on the targeted ideal users of Viagra, and the nationalized, racialized and sexualized identities they are assigned. As part of Pfizer’s marketing strategy of adjustments to fit the local consumer base, the ways in which Viagra is promoted (...)
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  21. Tommaso Ramus & Ericka Costa (2015). Italian Economia Aziendale as a Model Inspired by Catholic Humanism. In Martin Schlag & Domènec Melé (eds.), Humanism in Economics and Business. Springer Netherlands
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  22. Ericka Tucker (2016). Engaging Global Justice Through Internships. In Ramona Ilea & Julinna Oxley (eds.), Experiential Learning In Philosophy. Routledge 161-168.
  23. Ericka Tucker (2015). Multitude. In Andre Santos Campos (ed.), Spinoza: Basic Concepts. Imprint Academic 129-141.
    Spinoza’s ‘multitude’, while a key concept of his political philosophy, allows us to better understand Spinoza’s work both in its historical context and as a systematic unity. In this piece, I will propose that we understand Spinoza’s concept of the ‘multitude’ in the context of the development of his political thought, in particular his reading and interpretation of Thomas Hobbes, for whom ‘multitude’ was indeed a technical term. I will show that Spinoza develops his own notion of multitude as an (...)
     
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