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    Erika Henik (2008). Mad as Hell or Scared Stiff? The Effects of Value Conflict and Emotions on Potential Whistle-Blowers. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):111 - 119.
    Existing whistle-blowing models rely on “cold” economic calculations and cost-benefit analyses to explain the judgments and actions of potential whistle-blowers. I argue that “hot” cognitions – value conflict and emotions – should be added to these models. I propose a model of the whistle-blowing decision process that highlights the reciprocal influence of “hot” and “cold” cognitions and advocate research that explores how value conflict and emotions inform reporting decisions. I draw on the cognitive appraisal approach to emotions and on the (...)
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  2. Philip E. Tetlock & Erika Henik (2005). Theory- Versus Imagination-Driven Thinking About Historical Counterfactuals: Are We Prisoners of Our Preconceptions? In David R. Mandel, Denis J. Hilton & Patrizia Catellani (eds.), The Psychology of Counterfactual Thinking. Routledge
     
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    Erika Henik (2008). Mad as Hell or Scared Stiff? The Effects of Value Conflict and Emotions on Potential Whistle-Blowers. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):111-119.
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