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  1.  10
    Erin A. Egan (2007). Neuroimaging as Evidence. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):62-63.
  2. Erin A. Egan (2005). Bioterrorism Defense Education: Prioritizing Public Health Education. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):47-48.
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  3.  5
    Russell Burck, Lisa Anderson-Shaw, Mark Sheldon & Erin A. Egan (2006). The Clinical Response to Brain Death. Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 8 (2):53-59.
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  4.  12
    Kayhan P. Parsi & Erin A. Egan (2002). Patents: The Public Interest Versus the Private Privilege. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):45 – 46.
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  5.  8
    Erin A. Egan (2003). Organizational Ethics in Residency Training: Moral Conflict with Supervising Physicians. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):119-123.
    It is inevitable that physicians in training will be exposed to behavior by supervising physicians that the trainees find unethical. By nature these events are rare. It is imperative within any residency training program that resident physicians have immediate access to a meaningful review process in cases of moral conflict with supervising physicians. Here, I discuss the reasons why this issue must be recognized and what it entails. Most important, I discuss the procedural steps that are essential for the training (...)
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  6.  3
    Erin A. Egan (2002). Ethics Training in Graduate Medical Education. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):26 – 28.
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  7. Erin A. Egan & Patricia M. Surdyk (eds.) (2006). Living Professionalism: Reflections on the Practice of Medicine. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    A collection of personal narratives and essays, Living Professionalism is designed to help medical students and residents understand and internalize various aspects of professionalism. These essays are meant for personal reflection and above all, for thoughtful discussion with mentors, with peers, with others throughout the health care provider community who care about acting professionally.
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