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  1. Erin M. Cline (2014). Justice and Confucianism. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):165-175.
    This article surveys contemporary scholarship on justice and early Confucianism and builds upon recent work on justice in the Analects by examining the relationship between justice and moral self-cultivation in the Mengzi (Mencius) and the Xunzi. It is argued that focusing on early Confucian accounts of how a sense of justice is cultivated offers insights into Confucian views of justice because it shows how remarks on justice in the Analects, Mengzi, and Xunzi are not tangential, but rather are an important (...)
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  2. Erin M. Cline (2013). Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. Fordham University Press.
    Methods in comparative work -- The sense of justice in Rawls -- The sense of justice in the analects -- Two senses of justice -- The contemporary relevance of a sense of justice.
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  3. Erin M. Cline (2012). Confucian Ethics, Public Policy, and the Nurse-Family Partnership. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):337-356.
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  4. Erin M. Cline (2010). Angle, Stephen C. Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo‐Confucian Philosophy . New York: Oxford University Press, 2009 . Pp. 293. $74.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (4):826-831.
  5. Erin M. Cline (2009). Nameless Virtues and Restrained Speech in the Analects. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):53-69.
    Examples of “nameless” virtues are discussed by Aristotle in the Nicomachean Ethics. They are also found in the Confucian Analects. This paper explores what makes a virtue nameless in the Nicomachean Ethics and the Analects, and then argues that restrained speech is best understood as a nameless virtue in the Analects. It further argues that the virtue of restrained speech merits careful study because it contributes to our understanding of nameless virtues generally, while also deepening our understanding of Kongzi’s ethics (...)
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  6. Erin M. Cline (2009). The Way, the Right, and the Good. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):107-129.
    This article argues that Kongzi's religious ethics suggests an alternative way of understanding the relationship between the right and the good, in which neither takes clear precedence in terms of being more foundational for ethics. The religious underpinnings of Kongzi's understanding of the Way are examined, including the close relationship between tian ("Heaven") and the Way. It is shown that following the Way is defined primarily by the extent to which one's actions express certain virtues, and not whether one's actions (...)
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  7. Erin M. Cline (2008). Mirrors, Minds, and Metaphors. Philosophy East and West 58 (3):pp. 337-357.
    The metaphor of the heart or mind as a mirror appears not only in the work of Zhuangzi and Xunzi but also in the work of Western philosophers such as Kierkegaard and Rorty. This essay shows how a properly contextualized comparison of the mirror metaphor in the work of these four philosophers highlights the different ways in which they use it, helping us to understand more clearly critical differences between their views. The significance of the mirror metaphor in the work (...)
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  8. Erin M. Cline (2008). Rawls, Rosemont, and the Debate Over Rights and Roles.”. In Marthe Chandler Ronnie Littlejohn (ed.), Polishing the Chinese Mirror: Essays in Honor of Henry Rosemont, Jr. 76.
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  9. Erin M. Cline (2007). Two Senses of Justice: Confucianism, Rawls, and Comparative Political Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):361-381.
    This paper argues that a comparative study of the idea of a sense of justice in the work of John Rawls and the early Chinese philosopher Kongzi is mutually beneficial to our understanding of the thought of both figures. It also aims to provide an example of the relevance of moral psychology for basic questions in political philosophy. The paper offers an analysis of Rawls’s account of a sense of justice and its place within his theory of justice, focusing on (...)
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  10. Erin M. Cline (2006). Human Nature, Ritual, and History: Studies in Xunzi and Chinese Philosophy – Antonio S. Cua. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (3):453–455.
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  11. Erin M. Cline (2006). Review of Jiwei Ci, The Two Faces of Justice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).
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  12. Erin M. Cline (2005). Augustine's Change of Aspect. Heythrop Journal 46 (2):135–148.
  13. Erin M. Cline (2004). Two Interpretations of de in the Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):219–233.
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  14. By James Miller & Erin M. Cline (2004). Daoism: A Short Introduction. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):547–549.
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  15. Erin M. Cline (2003). Autonomy or Appropriateness? Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (1):179-187.
  16. Erin M. Cline & Ronnie L. Littlejohn (2002). Taishan's Tradition: The Quantification and Prioritization of Moral Wrongs in a Contemporary Daoist Religion. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 2 (1):117-140.
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