Search results for 'Ernest Lepore with K. Ludwig' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ernest Lepore & K. Ludwig (2009). Davidson. In Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (eds.), 12 Modern Philosophers. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 19200.0
    Donald Davidson (1917 – 2003) was born in Springfield, Massachusetts , and raised, from 1924, in Staten Island, New York. He was educated both as an undergraduate and graduate at Harvard University. After a stint in the navy during the Second World War, which interrupted his graduate education, he returned to Harvard to complete a dissertation on Plato‟s Philebus in 1949. He became one the most important philosophers of second half of the 20 t h century.
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  2. Ernie Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2007). Donald Davidson: Meaning, Truth, Language, and Reality. Clarendon Press.score: 12240.0
    Ernest Lepore and Kirk Ludwig present the definitive critical exposition of the philosophical system of Donald Davidson (1917-2003). Davidson's ideas had a deep and broad influence in the central areas of philosophy; he presented them in brilliant essays over four decades, but never set out explicitly the overarching scheme in which they all have their place. Lepore's and Ludwig's book will therefore be the key work, besides Davidson's own, for understanding one of the greatest philosophers (...)
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  3. Ernest LePore & Kirk Ludwig (2007). Donald Davidson's Truth-Theoretic Semantics. Clarendon Press.score: 12059.8
    The work of Donald Davidson (1917-2003) transformed the study of meaning. Ernie Lepore and Kirk Ludwig, two of the world's leading authorities on Davidson's work, present the definitive study of his widely admired and influential program of truth-theoretic semantics for natural languages, giving an exposition and critical examination of its foundations and applications.
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  4. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2002). What is Logical Form? In Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.), Logical Form and Language. Clarendon Press. 54--90.score: 12000.0
    Bertrand Russell, in the second of his 1914 Lowell lectures, Our Knowledge of the External World, asserted famously that ‘every philosophical problem, when it is subjected to the necessary analysis and purification, is found either to be not really philosophical at all, or else to be, in the sense in which we are using the word, logical’ (Russell 1993, p. 42). He went on to characterize that portion of logic that concerned the study of forms of propositions, or, as he (...)
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  5. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2006). Ontology in the Theory of Meaning. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (3):325 – 335.score: 12000.0
    This paper advances a general argument, inspired by some remarks of Davidson, to show that appeal to meanings as entities in the theory of meaning is neither necessary nor sufficient for carrying out the tasks of the theory of meaning. The crucial point is that appeal to meaning as entities fails to provide us with an understanding of any expression of a language except insofar as we pick it out with an expression we understand which we tacitly recognize (...)
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  6. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2000). The Semantics and Pragmatics of Complex Demonstratives. Mind 109 (434):199-240.score: 12000.0
    Complex demonstratives, expressions of the form 'That F', 'These Fs', etc., have traditionally been taken to be referring terms. Yet they exhibit many of the features of quantified noun phrases. This has led some philosophers to suggest that demonstrative determiners are a special kind of quantifier, which can be paraphrased using a context sensitive definite description. Both these views contain elements of the truth, though each is mistaken. We advance a novel account of the semantic form of complex demonstratives that (...)
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  7. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2003). Outline for a Truth-Conditional Semantics for Tense. In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Tense, Time and Reference. MIT. 49-105.score: 8100.0
    Our aim in the present paper is to investigate, from the standpoint of truth-theoretic semantics, English tense, temporal designators and quantifiers, and other expressions we use to relate ourselves and other things to the temporal order. Truth-theoretic semantics provides a particularly illuminating standpoint from which to discuss issues about the semantics of tense, and their relation to thoughts at, and about, times. Tense, and temporal modifiers, contribute systematically to conditions under which sentences we utter are true or false. A Tarski-style (...)
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  8. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2004). Donald Davidson. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):309–333.score: 8100.0
    Davidson, Donald (Herbert) (b. 1917, d. 2003; American), Willis S. and Marion Slusser Professor, University of California at Berkeley (1986–2003). Previously Instructor then Professor in Philosophy at: Queens College New York (1947–1950), Stanford University, California (1950–1967), Princeton University (1967–1969), Rockefeller University, New York City (1970–1976), University of Chicago (1976–1981), University of California at Berkeley (1981–2003). John Locke Lecturer, University of Oxford (1970).
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  9. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2007). Radical Misinterpretation: Reply to Stoutland. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):557-585.score: 8100.0
    This paper responds to a critical review of our 2005 book Donald Davidson: Meaning, Truth, Language and Reality, by Frederick Stoutland. It identifies a number of serious misreadings of both Davidson and the book.
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  10. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (eds.) (2013). A Companion to Donald Davidson (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy). Blackwell.score: 8100.0
    A Companion to Donald Davidson presents newly commissioned essays by leading figures within contemporary philosophy. Taken together, they provide a comprehensive overview of Davidson’s work across its full range, and an assessment of his many contributions to philosophy.
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  11. Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (1986). Truth in Meaning. In Ernest LePore (ed.), Truth and Interpretation: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Cambridge: Blackwell. 3--25.score: 8100.0
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  12. Ernie Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2011). Truth and Meaning Redux. Philosophical Studies 154 (2):251-77.score: 2400.0
    In this paper, we defend Davidson's program in truth-theoretical semantics against recent criticisms by Scott Soames. We argue that Soames has misunderstood Davidson's project, that in consequence his criticisms miss the mark, that appeal to meanings as entities in the alternative approach that Soames favors does no work, and that the approach is no advance over truth-theoretic semantics.
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  13. Ernie Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2007). Radical Misinterpretation: A Reply to Stoutland. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):557 – 585.score: 2400.0
    This paper responds to a critical review of our 2005 book Donald Davidson: Meaning, Truth, Language and Reality, by Frederick Stoutland. It identifies a number of serious misreadings of both Davidson and the book.
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  14. Ernie Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (2009). Davidson. In Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (eds.), 12 Modern Philosophers. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 2400.0
     
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  15. Ernest LePore & Ludwig Kirk (2005). Donald Davidson: Meaning, Truth, Language, and Reality. Oxford University Press.score: 1674.0
    Ernest Lepore and Kirk Ludwig present the definitive critical exposition of the philosophical system of Donald Davidson (1917-2003). Davidson's ideas had a deep and broad influence in the central areas of philosophy; he presented them in brilliant essays over four decades, but never set out explicitly the overarching scheme in which they all have their place. Lepore's and Ludwig's book will therefore be the key work, besides Davidson's own, for understanding one of the greatest philosophers (...)
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  16. Miguel Hoeltje (2013). Lepore and Ludwig on 'Explicit Meaning Theories'. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):831-839.score: 363.6
    The fundamental problem proponents of truth conditional semantics must face is to specify what role a truth theory is supposed to play within a meaning theory. The most detailed proposal for tackling this problem is the account developed by Ernest Lepore and Kirk Ludwig. However, as I will show in this paper, theories along the lines of Lepore and Ludwig do not suffice to put someone into the position to understand the objectlanguage. The fundamental problem (...)
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  17. James W. Garson (2006). Review of Ernest Lepore, Kirk Ludwig, Donald Davidson: Meaning, Truth, Language, and Reality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (2).score: 350.4
    Over the last forty years, Donald Davidson has been one of the most influential, but least accessible voices in philosophy. There are several reasons why it is hard to come to grips with his work. First, his language is dense, even by the standards of analytic philosophy; while at the same time his thought is highly organic, so that it is difficult to make sense of one idea without an understanding of his whole program. Davidson never attempted to write (...)
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  18. Arnold M. Ludwig (1997). How Do We Know Who We Are?: A Biography of the Self. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    "The terrain of the self is vast," notes renowned psychiatrist Arnold Ludwig, "parts known, parts impenetrable, and parts unexplored." How do we construct a sense of ourselves? How can a self reflect upon itself or deceive itself? Is all personal identity plagiarized? Is a "true" or "authentic" self even possible? Is it possible to really "know" someone else or ourselves for that matter? To answer these and many other intriguing questions, Ludwig takes a unique approach, examining the art (...)
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  19. Curtis K. Deutsch, Wesley W. Ludwig & William J. McIlvane (2008). Heterogeneity and Hypothesis Testing in Neuropsychiatric Illness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):266-267.score: 264.0
    The confounding effects of heterogeneity in biological psychiatry and psychiatric genetics have been widely discussed in the literature. We suggest an approach in which heterogeneity may be put to use in hypothesis testing, and may find application in evaluation of the Crespi & Badcock (C&B) imprinting hypothesis. Here we consider three potential sources of etiologic subtypes for analysis.
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  20. K. Herb & B. Ludwig (1993). Natural State, Property and Statehood, Kant, Immanuel Relativization of the Hobbesian Ideal. Kant-Studien 84 (3):283-316.score: 264.0
  21. Gilbert Harman (2011). Review of Ernest Lepore and Kirk Ludwig, Donald Davidson's Truth-Theoretic Semantics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):788-792.score: 259.2
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  22. Matthew Rellihan (2010). Ernest Lepore and Kurt Ludwig, Donald Davidson's Truth Theoretic Semantics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):360-362.score: 259.2
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  23. Matthew Rellihan (2009). Ernest Lepore and Kurt Ludwig, Donald Davidson's Truth Theoretic Semantics. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):360.score: 259.2
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  24. Pascal Engel (2007). Review of Ernest Lepore, Kirk Ludwig, Donald Davidson's Truth-Theoretic Semantics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (8).score: 253.8
  25. H. Verri (1980). Neoclassical Discourse. Yale UP 1980. Pp. Play About a Good Woman. Ed. Ian Small. 334.,£ 15-95. Ernest Benn, The New Mermaids. 1980. SEARLE, CHEIS (Ed.). Backlight: Poems From Pp. 102. Paperbound,£ 2* 95. The Labour Movement in East London. Pluto WITTGENSTEIN, LUDWIG. Culture and Value. Press in Association with The National Blackwell. 1980. Pp. 94.,£ 9* 50. [REVIEW] Indian Philosophical Quarterly 7 (3).score: 243.0
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  26. K. Ludwig (2007). Review: Subjective, Intersubjective, Objective * Review: Problems of Rationality * Review: Truth, Language, and History. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (462):405-416.score: 240.0
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  27. Stefan Mandl & Bernd Ludwig (2007). Coping with Unconsidered Context of Formalized Knowledge. In. In D. C. Richardson B. Kokinov (ed.), Modeling and Using Context. Springer. 342--355.score: 240.0
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  28. Nathaniel Goldberg (2008). Tension Within Triangulation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):363-383.score: 199.2
    Philosophers disagree about how meaning connects with history. Donald Davidson, who helped deepen our understanding of meaning, even disagreed with himself. As Ernest Lepore and Kirk Ludwig note, Davidson’s account of radical interpretation treats meaning as ahistorical; his Swampman thought experiment treats it as historical. Here I show that while Lepore and Ludwig are right that Davidson’s views are in tension, they are wrong about its extent. Unbeknownst to them, Davidson’s account of radical (...)
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  29. Dean C. Ludwig & Clinton O. Longenecker (1993). The Bathsheba Syndrome: The Ethical Failure of Successful Leaders. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (4):265 - 273.score: 120.0
    Reports of ethical violations by upper level managers continue to multiply despite increasing attention being given to ethics by firms and business schools. Much of the analysis of these violations focuses on either these managers'lack of operational principles or their willingness to abandon principles in the face ofcompetitive pressures. Much of the attention by firms and business schools focuses either on the articulation of operational principles (a deontological approach) or on the training of managers to sort their way through subtle (...)
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  30. Kirk Ludwig (2002). Vagueness And The Sorites Paradox. Noûs 36 (s16):419-461.score: 120.0
    A sorites argument is a symptom of the vagueness of the predicate with which it is constructed. A vague predicate admits of at least one dimension of variation (and typically more than one) in its intended range along which we are at a loss when to say the predicate ceases to apply, though we start out confident that it does. It is this feature of them that the sorites arguments exploit. Exactly how is part of the subject of this (...)
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  31. Kirk A. Ludwig (1996). Singular Thought and the Cartesian Theory of Mind. Noûs 30 (4):434-460.score: 120.0
    (1) Content properties are nonrelational, that is, having a content property does not entail the existence of any contingent object not identical with the thinker or a part of the thinker.2 (2) We have noninferential knowledge of our conscious thoughts, that is, for any of our..
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  32. Kirk A. Ludwig (1993). A Dilemma for Searle's Argument for the Connection Principle. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 16 (1):194-5.score: 120.0
    Objections to Searle's argument for the Connection Principle and its consequences (Searle 1990a) fall roughly into three categories: (1) those that focus on problems with the _argument_ for the Connection Principle; (2) those that focus on problems in understanding the _conclusion_ of this argument; (3) those that focus on whether the conclusion has the _consequences_ Searle claims for it. I think the Connection Principle is both true and important, but I do not think that Searle's argument establishes it. The (...)
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  33. Kirk A. Ludwig (1993). Direct Reference in Thought and Speech. Communication and Cognition 26 (1):49-76.score: 120.0
    I want to begin by distinguishing between what I will call a pure Fregean theory of reference and a theory of direct reference. A pure Fregean theory of reference holds that all reference to objects is determined by a sense or content. The kind of theory I have in mind is obviously inspired by Frege, but I will not be concerned with whether it is the theory that Frege himself held.1 A theory of direct reference, as I will understand (...)
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  34. Kirk Ludwig (2013). The Argument for Subject‐Body Dualism From Transtemporal Identity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):684-701.score: 120.0
    Martine Nida-Rümelin has argued recently for subject-body dualism on the basis of reflections on the possibility of survival in fission cases from the literature on personal identity. The argument focuses on the claim that there is a factual difference between the claims that one or the other of two equally good continuers of a person in a fission case is identical with her. I consider three interpretations of the notion of a factual difference that the argument employs, and I (...)
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  35. Thomas E. Ludwig (1997). Selves and Brains: Tracing a Path Between Interactionism and Materialism. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):489-495.score: 120.0
    A dialog between Donald MacKay and Mario Bunge, printed in the journal Neuroscience over the course of two years beginning in 1977, provides a conscise summary of MacKay's views on the mind-body relationship. In this dialog, MacKay contrasts the dualistic interactionism theory of Popper and Eccles with Bunge's emergentist materialism theory, and then builds a case for a third alternative based on the notion of mental events embodied in, but not identical to, brain events. Although neuroscience has made tremendous (...)
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  36. Kirk Ludwig (2007). Collective Intentional Behavior From the Standpoint of Semantics. Noûs 41 (3):355–393.score: 120.0
    This paper offers an analysis of the logical form of plural action sentences that shows that collective actions so ascribed are a matter of all members of a group contributing to bringing some event about. It then uses this as the basis for a reductive account of the content of we-intentions according to which what distinguishes we-intentions from I-intentions is that we-intentions are directed about bringing it about that members of a group act in accordance with a shared plan.
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  37. Kirk A. Ludwig (1994). First-Person Knowledge and Authority. In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Language Mind and Epistemology: On Donald Davidson's Philosophy. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 120.0
    Let us call a thought or belief whose content would be expressed by a sentence of subject-predicate form (by the thinker or someone attributing the thought to the thinker) an ‘ascription’. Thus, the thought that Madonna is middle-aged is an ascription of the property of being middle-aged to Madonna. To call a thought of this form an ascription is to emphasize the predicate in the sentence that gives its content. Let us call an ‘x-ascription’ an ascription whose subject is x, (...)
     
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  38. Clinton Longenecker & Dean Ludwig (1990). Ethical Dilemmas in Performance Appraisal Revisited. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (12):961 - 969.score: 120.0
    In managers' dynamic, real-world environments, they often feel it is necessary to exercise some creative discretion over employee ratings. Most managers do not describe their ratings of subordinates in performance appraisals as completely honest or accurate. The inaccuracy is often in the form of inflated ratings. They justify the inaccuracy by sighting, among other things, the need to avoid confrontation with subordinates, damaging working relationships, and creating permanent written documents which may later harm a subordinate's career. Many of these (...)
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  39. David Ludwig (2013). Disagreement in Scientific Ontologies. Journal for General Philosophy of Science (1):1-13.score: 120.0
    The aim of this article is to discuss the nature of disagreement in scientific ontologies in the light of case studies from biology and cognitive science. I argue that disagreements in scientific ontologies are usually not about purely factual issues but involve both verbal and normative aspects. Furthermore, I try to show that this partly non-factual character of disagreement in scientific ontologies does not lead to a radical deflationism but is compatible with a “normative ontological realism.” Finally, I argue (...)
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  40. John I. Biro & Kirk A. Ludwig (1994). Are There More Than Minimal a Priori Limits on Irrationality? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):89-102.score: 120.0
    Our concern in this paper is with the question of how irrational an intentional agent can be, and, in particular, with an argument Stephen Stich has given for the claim that there are only very minimal a priori requirements on the rationality of intentional agents. The argument appears in chapter 2 of The Fragmentation of Reason.1 Stich is concerned there with the prospects for the ‘reform-minded epistemologist’. If there are a priori limits on how irrational we can (...)
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  41. Kirk A. Ludwig (1993). Causal Relevance and Thought Content. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (176):334-53.score: 120.0
    It is natural to think that our ordinary practices in giving explanations for our actions, for what we do, commit us to claiming that content properties are causally relevant to physical events such as the movements of our limbs and bodies, and events which these in turn cause. If you want to know why my body arnbulates across the street, or why my arm went up before I set out, we suppose I have given you an answer when I say (...)
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  42. Kirk Ludwig (2000). The Semantics and Pragmatics of Complex Demonstratives. Mind 109 (434):199 - 240.score: 120.0
    Complex demonstratives, expressions of the form "That F, "These Fs", etc., have traditionally been taken to be referring terms. Yet they exhibit many of the features of quantified noun phrases. This has led some philosophers to suggest that demonstrative determiners are a special kind of quantifier, which can be paraphrased using a context sensitive definite description. Both these views contain elements of the truth, though each is mistaken. We advance a novel account of the semantic form of complex demonstratives that (...)
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  43. Kirk Ludwig (2014). Proxy Agency in Collective Action. Noûs 48 (1):75-105.score: 120.0
    This paper gives an account of proxy agency in the context of collective action. It takes the case of a group announcing something by way of a spokesperson as an illustration. In proxy agency, it seems that one person or subgroup's doing something counts as or constitutes or is recognized as (tantamount to) another person or group's doing something. Proxy agency is pervasive in institutional action. It has been taken to be a straightforward counterexample to an appealing deflationary view of (...)
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  44. Kirk Ludwig (1992). Brains in a Vat, Subjectivity, and the Causal Theory of Reference. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:313-345.score: 120.0
    This paper evaluates Putnam’s argument in the first chapter of Reason, Truth and History, for the claim that we can know that we are not brains in a vat (of a certain sort). A widespread response to Putnam’s argument has been that if it were successful not only the world but the meanings of our words (and consequently our thoughts) would be beyond the pale of knowledge, because a causal theory of reference is not compatible with our having knowledge (...)
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  45. Kirk A. Ludwig (1993). Dretske on Explaining Behavior. Acta Analytica 11 (11):111-124.score: 120.0
    Fred Dretske has recently argued, in a highly original book and a series of articles, that action explanations are a very special species of historical explanation, in opposition to the traditional view that action explanations cite causes of actions, which are identical with bodily movements. His account aims to explain how it is possible for there to be a genuine explanatory role for reasons in a world of causes, and, in particular, in a world in which we have available (...)
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  46. Kirk A. Ludwig (1996). Duplicating Thoughts. Mind and Language 11 (1):92-102.score: 120.0
    Suppose that a physical duplicate of me, right down to the arrangements of subatomic particles, comes into existence at the time at which I finish this sentence. Suppose that it comes into existence by chance, or at least by a causal process entirely unconnected with me. It might be so situated that it, too, is seated in front of a computer, and finishes this paragraph and paper, or a corresponding one, just as I do. (i) Would it have the (...)
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  47. Bernd Ludwig (2003). Warum Kommen "Mentale Ursachen" Physikalischen Erklärungen Eigentlich Nicht in Die Quere? Einige Grundsätzliche Überlegungen Zur Verwendung Des Ausdrucks "a Verursacht B" Im Umkreis Moderner Naturwissenschaftlicher Theorien. Grazer Philosophische Studien 65 (1):169-194.score: 120.0
    A careful examination of the concept of a "physical law" in modern experimental science reveals that "cause" is a purely metatheoretical term in physics: Causal knowledge is merely pre-nomological knowledge about the explanatory and predictive relevance of our nomological knowledge, and that is: of our theories. While effects are facts, that is, events under a certain (theory-dependent) description, causes are just events. Causal talk comes into play only when physical explanations of certain facts fail or are (at the time being) (...)
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  48. Pascal Ludwig (2005). Une Défense Hétérodoxe de la Conception Inférentialiste de I'introspection. Dialogue 44 (1):123-144.score: 120.0
    Le but de cet article est de défendre une conception inférentialiste de l’introspection des qualia contre une série d’objections apparemment décisives. Selon la theorie inférentialiste, une auto-attribution d’un état qualitatifest la conclusion d’un raisonnement, plutôt que le résultat d’une expérience d’un type spécifique. Contre cela, il a été remarqué qu'il ne semble pas exister de raisonnements déductifs formellement corrects permettant d’arriver à une conclusion introspective. Je concède que toute tentative visant à construire de tels raisonnements est à coup sûr vouée (...)
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  49. A. Ludwig & A. Zimper (2013). A Parsimonious Model of Subjective Life Expectancy. Theory and Decision 75 (4):519-541.score: 120.0
    On average, “young” people underestimate whereas “old” people overestimate their chances to survive into the future. Such subjective survival beliefs violate the rational expectations paradigm and are also not in line with models of rational Bayesian learning. In order to explain these empirical patterns in a parsimonious manner, we assume that self-reported beliefs express likelihood insensitivity and can, therefore, be modeled as non-additive beliefs. In a next step we introduce a closed form model of Bayesian learning for non-additive beliefs (...)
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  50. Kirk A. Ludwig (1994). Causal Relevance and Thought Content. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):334-353.score: 120.0
    It is natural to think that our ordinary practices in giving explanations for our actions, for what we do, commit us to claiming that content properties are causally relevant to physical events such as the movements of our limbs and bodies, and events which these in turn cause. If you want to know why my body arnbulates across the street, or why my arm went up before I set out, we suppose I have given you an answer when I say (...)
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