Search results for 'Ernest T. Mallya' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ernest T. Mallya (2009). Promoting the Effectiveness of Democracy Protection Institutions in Southern Africa: Tanzania's Commission for Human Rights and Good Governance. Eisa.
  2.  11
    Paul Ernest (1994). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education by Paul Ernest. Social Epistemology 8 (2):151 – 161.
  3. Jacques Abbadie & W. T. (1695). The Art of Knowing One-Self: Or, an Enquiry Into the Sources of Morality [Tr. By T.W.].
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  4. Paul Ernest (2009). John Ernest, A Mathematical Artist. Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal 24.
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  5. W. T. (1698). A Dialogue Between Mr. Merriman, and Dr. Chymist: Concerning John Sergents Paradoxes, in His New Method to Science, and His Solid Philosophy. By T.W. [REVIEW] [S.N.].
     
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  6. L. T. L. T. (1908). NUNN, T. P. -The Aim and Achievements of Scientific Method. [REVIEW] Mind 17:274.
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  7.  8
    A. S. Owen (1928). Some Verse Translations 1. Prometheus: I. Prometheus Bound of Aeschylus—a Metrical Version; II. Prometheus Unbound. By Clarence W. Mendell. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1926. 9s. 2. The Antigone of Sophocles. Translated by Hugh Macnaghten. Cambridge University Press, 1926. 2s. Net. 3. The Electra of Sophocles, with the First Part of the Peace of Aristophanes. Translated by J. T. Sheppard. Cambridge University Press, 1927. 2s. 6d. Net. 4. The Hippolytus of Euripides. Translated by Kenneth Johnstone. Published by Philip Mason for the Balliol Players, 1927. 2s. Net. 5. The Bacchanals of Euripides. Translated by Margaret Kinmont Tennant. Methuen and Co., Ltd., 1926. 6. Aristophanes. Vol. I. Translated by Arthur S. Way, D.Litt. Macmillan and Co., 1927. 10s. 6d. Net. 7. Others Abide. Translations From the Greek Anthology by Humbert Wolfe. Ernest Benn, Ltd., 1927. 6s. Net. 8. The Plays of Terence. Translated Into Parallel English Metres by William Ritchie, Professor of Latin in the Unive. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (02):64-67.
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    Charles Hartshorne (1934). Book Review:Scientific Theory and Religion. Ernest W. Barnes; Essentials in the Development of Religion, A Philosophic and Psychological Study. J. E. Turner; New Light on Fundamental Problems. T. V. Seshagiro Row. [REVIEW] Ethics 44 (4):465-.
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  9. Archives de Philosophie (1992). Que reste-t-il de la fondation rmç de la raison? Currfnt V^ 0^ r'par Jean-Ernest joos^. Archives de Philosophie 55:369-384.
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  10. Joseph Warren Beach (1942). American Fiction 1920-1940. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 (5):68-69.
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  11. Jerry A. Fodor & Ernest Lepore (1996). The Red Herring and the Pet Fish: Why Concepts Still Can't Be Prototypes. Cognition 58 (2):253-70.
    1 There is a Standard Objection to the idea that concepts might be prototypes (or exemplars, or stereotypes): Because they are productive, concepts must be compositional. Prototypes aren't compositional, so concepts can't be prototypes (see, e.g., Margolis, 1994).2 However, two recent papers (Osherson and Smith, 1988; Kamp and Partee, 1995) reconsider this consensus. They suggest that, although the Standard Objection is probably right in the long run, the cases where prototypes fail to exhibit compositionality are relatively exotic and involve phenomena (...)
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  12. Marc Alspector-Kelly (2011). Why Safety Doesn't Save Closure. Synthese 183 (2):127-142.
    Knowledge closure is, roughly, the following claim: For every agent S and propositions P and Q, if S knows P, knows that P implies Q, and believes Q because it is so implied, then S knows Q. Almost every epistemologist believes that closure is true. Indeed, they often believe that it so obviously true that any theory implying its denial is thereby refuted. Some prominent epistemologists have nevertheless denied it, most famously Fred Dretske and Robert Nozick. There are closure advocates (...)
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  13. Jerry A. Fodor & Ernest Lepore (1991). Why Meaning (Probably) Isn't Conceptual Role. Mind and Language 6 (4):328-43.
    It's an achievement of the last couple of decades that people who work in linguistic semantics and people who work in the philosophy of language have arrived at a friendly, de facto agreement as to their respective job descriptions. The terms of this agreement are that the semanticists do the work and the philosophers do the worrying. The semanticists try to construct actual theories of meaning (or truth theories, or model theories, or whatever) for one or another kind of expression (...)
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    Jerry A. Fodor & Ernest Lepore (2010). Why Meaning (Probably) Isn't Conceptual Role. In Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.), Philosophical Issues. Routledge 15 - 35.
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  15. Paul Boghossian (2009). Virtuous Intuitions: Comments on Lecture 3 of Ernest Sosa's a Virtue Epistemology. Philosophical Studies 144 (1):111--119.
    Abstract I agree with Sosa that intuitions are best thought of as attractions to believe a certain proposition merely on the basis of understanding it. However, I don’t think it is constitutive of them that they supply strictly foundational justification for the propositions they justify, though I do believe that it is important that the intuition of a suitable subject be thought of as a prima facie justification for his intuitive judgment, independently of the reliability of his underlying capacities. I (...)
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  16. Jerry Fodor & Ernest Lepore (1996). The Pet Fish and the Red Herring: Why Concepts Aren't Prototypes. Cognition 58 (2):243-76.
     
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  17.  5
    T. W. Manson (1950). Ernest Evans: Tertullian's Treatise Against Praxeas. Pp. Viii+342. London: S.P.C.K., 1948. Cloth, 21S. Net. The Classical Review 64 (01):35-.
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    T. W. Allen (1906). Champault's Geography of the Odyssey Philippe Champault. Phéniciens Et Grecs En Italic d'Apres l'Odyssée. Étude Géographique, Historique Et Sociale Par Une Méthode Nouvelle. Paris: Ernest Leroux, 1906. Fr. 6. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (09):470-.
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    T. Nicklin (1906). Burton on the Synoptic Problem Principles of Literary Criticism and the Synoptic Problem. By Ernest De Witt Burton. Printed From Volume V. Of the Decennial Publications. The University of Chicago Press, 1904. 4to. Pp. 72. $ 1 Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (02):127-128.
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    T. A. Sinclair (1931). Saint Augustine: The City of God. Translated by John Healey. With an Introduction by Ernest Barker. Three Volumes in One: Pp. Lxiv + 252 + 265 + 267. London and Toronto: J. M. Dent and Sons, Ltd., 1931. 7s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (05):201-.
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    T. W. Manson (1955). Ernest Evans: St. Augustine's Enchiridion or Manual to Laurentius Concerning Faith, Hope, and Charity. Translated with an Introduction and Notes. Pp. Xxviii+146. London: S.P.C.K., 1953. Cloth, 155. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (01):109-.
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    T. E. Jessop (1956). The Life of David Hume. By Ernest Campbell Mossner. (Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson & Sons. 1955 (Imprint 1954). Pp. Xx + 683. 42s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 31 (116):80-.
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    T. B. L. Webster (1952). Ernest Honigman: The Lost End of Menander's 'Epitrepontes', (Académie Royale de Belgique: Mémoires, XLVI. 2.) Pp. 43. Bruxelles: Palais des Académies, 1950. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 2 (02):109-110.
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    Armen T. Marsoobian (2009). Symposium on Ernest Sosa. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):179-179.
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    E. T. Mitchell (1932). Book Review:Types of Philosophy. William Ernest Hocking. [REVIEW] Ethics 42 (2):225-.
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  26. Ernest W. Adams (1984). Convention T's Pragmatic and Semantic Association, and Its Limitations. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 65 (2):124.
     
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  27. J. T. Bannon (1978). Punishing Criminals. By Ernest Van den Haag. New York, New York: Basic Books. 1975. American Journal of Jurisprudence 23 (1):242-244.
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  28. Ernest Goodall Braham (1929). Ourselves and Reality, Being a Discussion on Personality in British and American Idealism From the Time of T. H. Green. London, the Epworth Press, J. A. Sharp.
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  29. Ernest Gellner (1983). ADORNO, T. "Et Al".: "The Positivist Dispute in German Sociology". [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34:173.
     
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  30. Ernest Gellner (1962). T. A. Goudge's "The Ascent of Life". [REVIEW] Inquiry 5:85.
     
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  31. William Ernest Hocking (1931). Types of Philosophy. By E. T. Mitchell. [REVIEW] Ethics 42:225.
     
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  32. Ernest Jones & Anne Berman (1960). La vie et l'œuvre de Sigmund Freud. La jeunesse de Freud , t. I. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 150:392-393.
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  33. Ernest Nagel (1944). Review: W. T. Stace, Positivism. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 9 (3):76-76.
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  34. T. P. Uschanov (2002). Ernest Gellner's Criticisms of Wittgenstein and Ordinary Language Philosophy. In G. N. Kitching & Nigel Pleasants (eds.), Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality and Politics. Routledge 35--23.
     
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  35.  3
    Jack A. Adams, Philip H. Marshall & Ernest T. Goetz (1972). Response Feedback and Short-Term Motor Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):92.
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  36.  7
    Jack A. Adams, Ernest T. Goetz & Phillip H. Marshall (1972). Response Feedback and Motor Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):391.
  37.  6
    Ernest T. Robson (1894). Plautus Rudens 160—2. Schoell. The Classical Review 8 (08):349-.
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    Krist Vaesen (2011). Knowledge Without Credit, Exhibit 4: Extended Cognition. [REVIEW] Synthese 181 (515):529.
    The Credit Theory of Knowledge (CTK)—as expressed by such figures as John Greco, Wayne Riggs, and Ernest Sosa—holds that knowing that p implies deserving epistemic credit for truly believing that p . Opponents have presented three sorts of counterexamples to CTK: S might know that p without deserving credit in cases of (1) innate knowledge (Lackey, Kvanvig); (2) testimonial knowledge (Lackey); or (3) perceptual knowledge (Pritchard). The arguments of Lackey, Kvanvig and Pritchard, however, are effective only in so far (...)
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    Justin Khoo (2015). On Indicative And Subjunctive Conditionals. Philosophers' Imprint 15 (32).
    At the center of the literature on conditionals lies the division between indicative and subjunctive conditionals, and Ernest Adams’ famous minimal pair: If Oswald didn’t shoot Kennedy, someone else did. If Oswald hadn’t shot Kennedy, someone else would have. While a lot of attention is paid to figuring out what these different kinds of conditionals mean, significantly less attention has been paid to the question of why their grammatical differences give rise to their semantic differences. In this paper, I (...)
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  40. Jesper Kallestrup & Duncan Pritchard (2014). Virtue Epistemology and Epistemic Twin Earth. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):335-357.
    A popular form of virtue epistemology—defended by such figures as Ernest Sosa, Linda Zagzebski and John Greco—holds that knowledge can be exclusively understood in virtue-theoretic terms. In particular, it holds that there isn't any need for an additional epistemic condition to deal with the problem posed by knowledge-undermining epistemic luck. It is argued that the sustainability of such a proposal is called into question by the possibility of epistemic twin earth cases. In particular, it is argued that such cases (...)
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  41. Juan Comesaña (2005). Unsafe Knowledge. Synthese 146 (3):395 - 404.
    Ernest Sosa has argued that if someone knows that p, then his belief that p is “safe”. and Timothy Williamson has agreed. In this paper I argue that safety, as defined by Sosa, is not a necessary condition on knowledge – that we can have unsafe knowledge. I present Sosa’s definition of safety and a counterexample to it as a necessary condition on knowledge. I also argue that Sosa’s most recent refinements to the notion of safety don’t help him (...)
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  42. Doug Anderson (2003). Respectability and the Wild Beasts of the Philosophical Desert: The Heart of James's. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (1):1-13.
    This commentary was suggested to me in part by a colleague's remark that it would be nice if we could make William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience "respectable." The implication was that though there was something redeemable about the book, it somehow wasn't philosophically or scientifically proper. The remark awakened me to—or at least reminded me of—the fact that this has been a traditional take on James's text. As Julius Bixler points out, ridicule began soon after the book was (...)
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  43.  86
    Dominic Griffiths (2015). The Poet as ‘Worldmaker’: T.S. Eliot and the Religious Imagination. In Francesca Knox & David Lonsdale (eds.), The Power of the Word: Poetry and the Religious Imagination. Ashgate 161-175.
    Martin Heidegger defines the world as ‘the ever non-objective to which we are subject as long as the paths of birth and death . . . keep us transported into Being’. He writes that the world is ‘not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are at hand . . . The world worlds’. Being able to fully and richly express how the world worlds is the task of the artist, whose artwork is the (...)
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  44. Jonathan Ichikawa (2008). Skepticism and the Imagination Model of Dreaming. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):519–527.
    Penultimate draft; please refer to published version -- especially important in this case, as the official version has been Britishized; even the title's second letter is not the same. Abstract. Ernest Sosa has argued that the solution to dream skepticism lies in an understanding of dreams as imaginative experiences – when we dream, on this suggestion, we do not believe the contents of our dreams, but rather imagine them. Sosa rebuts skepticism thus: dreams don’t cause false beliefs, so my (...)
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  45.  53
    Dominic Griffiths (2014). Looking Into the Heart of Light: Considering the Poetic Event in the Work of T.S. Eliot and Martin Heidegger. Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):350-367.
    No one is quite sure what happened to T.S. Eliot in that rose-garden. What we do know is that it formed the basis for Four Quartets, arguably the greatest English poem written in the twentieth century. Luckily it turns out that Martin Heidegger, when not pondering the meaning of being, spent a great deal of time thinking and writing about the kind of event that Eliot experienced. This essay explores how Heidegger developed the concept of Ereignis, “event” which, in the (...)
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    Torsten Marcus Breden & Jochen Vollmann (2004). The Cognitive Based Approach of Capacity Assessment in Psychiatry: A Philosophical Critique of the MacCAT-T. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (4):273-283.
    This article gives a brief introduction to the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Treatment (MacCAT-T) and critically examines its theoretical presuppositions. On the basis of empirical, methodological and ethical critique it is emphasised that the cognitive bias that underlies the MacCAT-T assessment needs to be modified. On the one hand it has to be admitted that the operationalisation of competence in terms of value-free categories, e.g. rational decision abilities, guarantees objectivity to a great extent; but on the other hand it bears severe (...)
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    Alexander R. Galloway (2013). Laruelle and Art. Continent 2 (4):230-236.
    In the early 1990s François Laruelle wrote an essay on James Turrell, the American artist known for his use of light and space. 1 While it briefly mentions Turrell's Roden Crater and is cognizant of his other work, the essay focuses on a series of twenty aquatint etchings made by Turrell called First Light (1989-1990). Designed to stand alone as prints, First Light nevertheless acts as a kind of backward glance revisiting and meditating on earlier corner light projections made by (...)
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  48.  7
    Justin Khoo (2015). On Indicative And Subjunctive Conditionals. Philosophers' Imprint 15 (32).
    At the center of the literature on conditionals lies the division between indicative and subjunctive conditionals, and Ernest Adams’ famous minimal pair: If Oswald didn’t shoot Kennedy, someone else did. If Oswald hadn’t shot Kennedy, someone else would have. While a lot of attention is paid to figuring out what these different kinds of conditionals mean, significantly less attention has been paid to the question of why their grammatical differences give rise to their semantic differences. In this paper, I (...)
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  49.  2
    John Weckert, Hector Rodriguez Valdes & Sadjad Soltanzadeh (forthcoming). A Problem with Societal Desirability as a Component of Responsible Research and Innovation: The “If We Don’T Somebody Else Will” Argument. NanoEthics:1-11.
    The implementation of Responsible Research and Innovation is not without its challenges, and one of these is raised when societal desirability is included amongst the RRI principles. We will argue that societal desirability is problematic even though it appears to fit well with the overall ideal. This discord occurs partly because the idea of societal desirability is inherently ambiguous, but more importantly because its scope is unclear. This paper asks: is societal desirability in the spirit of RRI? On von Schomberg’s (...)
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  50. Arthur Merin, Unconditionals.
    Unconditionals are syntactic conditionals whose affirmation affirms their consequent, unconditionally. Prominent instances were addressed by J.L. Austin ('There are biscuits if you want some') and Nelson Goodman (even-if 'semifactuals'). Their detailed features are explained in a Decision-Theoretic Semantics (DTS) which extends, by certainty and relevance conditions, the "CCCP" conditional probability construal of conditionals due to Ernest Adams and others. The construal of assertions of conditionals as conditional acts, defended by Keith DeRose and Richard Grandy in 1999 against objections arising (...)
     
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