Search results for 'Error History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mariacarla Gadebusch Bondio & Agostino Paravicini Bagliani (eds.) (2012). Errors and Mistakes: A Cultural History of Fallibility. Sismel, Edizioni Del Galluzzo.score: 96.0
     
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  2. Fiona Ellis (2005). Concepts and Reality in the History of Philosophy: Tracing a Philosophical Error From Locke to Bradley. Routledge.score: 90.0
    This book traces a deep misunderstanding about the relation of concepts and reality in the history of philosophy. It exposes the influence of the mistake in the thought of Locke, Berkeley, Kant, Nietzche and Bradley, and suggests that the solution can be found in Hegelian thought. Ellis argues that the treatment proposed exemplifies Hegel's dialectical method. This is an important contribution to this area of philosophy.
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  3. G. R. Evans (1998). Getting It Wrong: The Mediaeval Epistemology of Error. Brill.score: 78.0
    Deals with the dark side of the medieval theory of knowledge, the pursuit of knowldge in 'wrong' ways, 'common knowledge' and departures from it, wisdom and ...
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  4. Jonas Olson (2014). Moral Error Theory: History, Critique, Defence. Oup Oxford.score: 78.0
    Jonas Olson presents a critical survey of moral error theory, the view that there are no moral facts and so all moral claims are false. Part I explores the historical context of the debate; Part II assesses J. L. Mackie's famous arguments; Part III defends error theory against challenges and considers its implications for our moral thinking.
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  5. A. Neill & A. Ridley (2012). Relational Theories of Art: The History of an Error. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2):141-151.score: 72.0
    Relational theories of art—paradigmatically, the ‘Institutional’ theory—arose from dissatisfaction with the Wittgenstein-inspired ‘family resemblance’ account of art, and were taken not merely to be preferable in various ways to that account, but actually to falsify it. We argue that this latter thought is rooted in a fundamental misunderstanding of the falsification-conditions of a family resemblance account; and we suggest that, once the reasons for this are appreciated, any apparent motivation to engage in relational theorizing about art evaporates.
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  6. Robert Stern (2006). Review of Ellis, Fiona, Concepts and Reality in the History of Philosophy: Tracing a Philosophical Error From Locke to Bradley. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).score: 72.0
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  7. Michael Inwood (2009). Fiona Ellis, From Nietzsche to Hegel: Concepts and Reality in the History of Philosophy: Tracing a Philosophical Error From Locke to Bradley. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (2):344-345.score: 72.0
  8. Pavel Kovaly (1973). The History of an Error. Studies in East European Thought 13 (1-2):20-54.score: 72.0
    Lukács has had a colorful career as a Communist theoretician. One of the strangest events is the fact that he continued to recant in 1967, when there was no longer the external pressure to do so. This may be due to the fact that his differences with Marx on subject-object, praxis, etc., are not those of a humanist.
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  9. Frederick Rosen (2006). The Philosophy of Error and Liberty of Thought: J.S. Mill on Logical Fallacies. Informal Logic 26 (2):121-147.score: 72.0
    Most recent discussions of John Stuart Mill’s System of Logic (1843) neglect the fifth book concerned with logical fallacies. Mill not only follows the revival of interest in the traditional Aristotelian doctrine of fallacies in Richard Whately and Augustus De Morgan, but he also develops new categories and an original analysis which enhance the study of fallacies within the context of what he calls ‘the philosophy of error’. After an exploration of this approach, the essay relates the philosophy of (...)
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  10. Geneviève Warland (1989). ME Moss, Benedetto Croce Reconsidered. Truth and Error in Theories of Art, Literature, and History. With a Foreword by Maurice Mandelbaum. [REVIEW] Revue Philosophique de Louvain 87 (76):652-655.score: 72.0
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  11. Douglas Allchin (2006). Why Respect for History–and Historical Error–Matters. Science and Education 15 (1):91-111.score: 72.0
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  12. Nathan Brown (2011). Red Years: Althusser's Lesson, Rancière's Error and the Real Movement of History. Radical Philosophy 170:16.score: 72.0
     
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  13. Thomas Leddy (1988). ME Moss, Benedetto Croce Reconsidered: Truth and Error in Theories of Art, Literature, and History Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (7):273-276.score: 72.0
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  14. M. E. Moss (1987). Benedetto Croce Reconsidered: Truth and Error in Theories of Art, Literature, and History. University Press of New England.score: 72.0
     
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  15. Friedrich Nietzsche (2010). How the "True World" Finally Became a Fable : The History of an Error : The Will to Power as Art. In Christopher Want (ed.), Philosophers on Art From Kant to the Postmodernists: A Critical Reader. Columbia University Press.score: 72.0
     
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  16. Altug Yalcintas (2011). On Error: Undisciplined Thoughts on One of the Causes of Intellectual Path Dependency. Ankara University SBF Review 66 (2):215-233.score: 66.0
    Is there not any place in the history of ideas for the imperfect character of human doings (i.e. capability of error) that is repeated for so long until we lately start to think that it had long been wrong? The answer is: In the conventional histories of ideas there is almost none. The importance of the phenomenon,however, is immense. Intellectual history is full of errors. Scholarly errors are among the factors that generate intellectual pathways in which consequences (...)
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  17. Joel Thomas Tierno (1997). Descartes on God and Human Error. Humanities Press.score: 66.0
  18. Edmilson Menezes (2013). História sem Redenção: a oposição a Bossuet e a gênese da filosofia da história voltairiana. Doispontos 9 (3).score: 48.0
    presente trabalho busca explicitar alguns elementos da concepção voltairiana da história (e do historiador). A intenção não é a de inventariar, segundo uma ordem cronológica, a formação de uma filosofia da história em Voltaire, mas tão somente apresentar uma face dessa gênese, a saber, a crítica à teologia da história, que se encontra embasando aquele ponto de vista. Não há dúvida de que o erro faz parte do homem. Assim como a superstição, o fanatismo, o ódio, o crime, a guerra (...)
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  19. Christiane Sinding (1989). The History of Resistant Rickets: A Model for Understanding the Growth of Biomedical Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 22 (3):461 - 495.score: 48.0
    Two essential periods may be identified in the early stages of the history of vitamin D-resistant rickets. The first was the period during which a very well known deficiency disease, rickets, acquired a scientific status: this required the development of unifying principles to confer upon the newly developing science of pathology a doctrine without which it would have been condemned to remain a collection of unrelated facts with very little practical application. One first such unifying principle was provided by (...)
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  20. Marshall Thomsen & D. Resnik (1995). The Effectiveness of the Erratum in Avoiding Error Propagation in Physics. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):231-240.score: 46.0
    The propagation of errors in physics research is studied, with particular attention being paid to the effectiveness of the erratum in avoiding error propagation. We study the citation history of 17 physics papers which have significant errata associated with them. It would appear that the existence of an erratum does not significantly decrease the frequency with which a paper is cited and in most cases the erratum isnot cited along with the original paper. The authors comment on implications (...)
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  21. Peter J. Graham (forthcoming). Functions, Warrant, History. In Abrol Fairweather & Owen Flanagan (eds.), Naturalizing Epistemic Virtue. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    I hold that epistemic warrant consists in the normal functioning of the belief-forming process when the process has forming true beliefs reliably as an etiological function. Evolution by natural selection is the central source of etiological functions. This leads many to think that on my view warrant requires a history of natural selection. What then about learning? What then about Swampman? Though functions require history, natural selection is not the only source. Self-repair and trial-and-error learning are both (...)
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  22. Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2007). Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science I: Agency, Error, and the Interactive Exploration of Possibility Space in Early Ape-Langugae Research. Perspectives on Science 15 (1):87-124.score: 42.0
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper (Farrell and Hooker, b) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning (SDAL). The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape-language research. In this first paper we outline five prominent features of SDAL that will need to be realized in applying SDAL to science: 1) interactive exploration of possibility space; (...)
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  23. Jutta Schickore (2002). (Ab)Using the Past for Present Purposes: Exposing Contextual and Trans-Contextual Features of Error. Perspectives on Science 10 (4):433-456.score: 42.0
    : This paper is concerned with the claim that epistemic terms and categories are historical entities. The starting point is the observation that recent attempts at historical studies of epistemic terms fail to bridge the gap between history and philosophy proper. I examine whether, and how, it is possible to forge a closer link between historical and philosophical aspects of conceptual analysis. The paper explores possible links by analyzing aspects of the concept of error. A "pragmatic" and a (...)
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  24. Ernst von Weizsacker & C. von Weizsacker (2006). Information, Evolution, and 'Error-Friendliness'. Mind and Matter 4 (2):235-247.score: 42.0
    Information can be conceived as being composed of two complementary components: novelty and confirmation. Whenever either of the two is zero, information is zero. Genetic information, too, requires both novelty and confirmation. Evolution can be seen as the history of diversification. Selection alone reduces diversity. Recessivity appears to serve as a mechanism to protect diversity against selection. So does the geographical and behavioral 'separation' of species. Both recessivity and separation can be seen as 'error-friendly', a broader concept that (...)
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  25. David Oldroyd (1999). Non-Written Sources in the Study of the History of Geology: Pros and Cons, in the Light of the Views of Collingwood and Foucault. Annals of Science 56 (4):395-415.score: 42.0
    The paper discusses some of the problems that may be encountered in writing the history of geology with the help of non-written sources, but also offers suggestions as to the kinds of sources that may prove useful. It considers particularly the well-known proposition of R. G. Collingwood that historical writing should involve the attempted 're-enactment of past experience', and also criticisms of such idealist philosophies of history as have been made by Michel Foucault. In considering the relative merits (...)
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  26. Marco Steinhauser, Heike Eichele, Hilde T. Juvodden, Rene J. Huster, Markus Md Phd Ullsperger & Tom Eichele (2012). Error-Preceding Brain Activity Reflects (Mal-)Adaptive Adjustments of Cognitive Control: A Modeling Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 42.0
    Errors in choice tasks are preceded by gradual changes in brain activity presumably related to fluctuations in cognitive control that promote the occurrence of errors. In the present paper, we use connectionist modeling to explore the hypothesis that these fluctuations reflect (mal-)adaptive adjustments of cognitive control. We considered ERP data from a study in which the probability of conflict in an Eriksen flanker task was manipulated in sub-blocks of trials. Errors in these data were preceded by a gradual decline of (...)
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  27. Charles Pigden (2009). Introduction to Hume on Motivation and Virtue. In Hume on Motivation and Virtue. 1-29.score: 36.0
    This includes a methodological meditation (in blank verse) on the history of philosophy as a contribution to philosophy (rather than as a contribution to history) plus a conspectus of the issues surrounding Hume, the Motivation Argument and the Slavery of Reason Thesis. However I am posting it here mainly because it contains a novel restatement of the Argument from Queerness. Big Thesis: the Slavery of Reason Thesis (via the Motivation Argument) provides no support for non-cognitivism or emotivism, but (...)
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  28. Carlo Rovelli (2011). Che Cos'è la Scienza: La Rivoluzione di Anassimandro. Mondadori Università.score: 36.0
    All human civilizations have thought that the world was made of sky above and the Earth below. All except one. For the Greeks, the Earth was a rock floating in space, and under the earth there was no ground, no turtles, nor the gigantic columns of which the Bible speaks. How did the Greeks understand that the Earth is suspended in nothingness? Who understood this and how? It is this unique "scientific revolution" of Anaximander of which the author speaks, which (...)
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  29. Anthony Kemp (1991). The Estrangement of the Past: A Study in the Origins of Modern Historical Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    In this strikingly bold and original work, Kemp argues that the Western idea of time reversed itself between the fourteenth and the eighteenth century from a static and syncretic image of a temporal world in which all time is uniform, the past is the arbiter of truth and all inherited knowledge is eternally viable, and no secrets lie hidden in time waiting to be revealed to a future age; to a dynamic and supersessive model of history in which the (...)
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  30. Margaret MacMillan (2008/2009). Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of History. Modern Library.score: 36.0
    Margaret MacMillan, an acclaimed historian and “great storyteller” ( The New York Review of Books ), explores here the many ways in which history–its values and dangers–affects us all, including how it is used and abused. The New York Times bestselling author of Paris 1919 and Nixon and Mao reveals how a deeper engagement with history in our private lives and, more important, in the sphere of public debate can guide us to a richer, more enlightened existence, as (...)
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  31. Margaret MacMillan (2008). The Uses and Abuses of History. Viking Canada.score: 32.0
     
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  32. G. R. (2003). Novelty and the 1919 Eclipse Experiments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (1):107-129.score: 30.0
    In her 1996 book, Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge, Deborah Mayo argues that use- (or heuristic) novelty is not a criterion we need to consider in assessing the evidential value of observations. Using the notion of a ''severe'' test, Mayo claims that such novelty is valuable only when it leads to severity, and never otherwise. To illustrate her view, she examines the historical case involving the famous 1919 British eclipse expeditions that generated observations supporting Einstein's theory of (...)
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  33. Thomas Muller (2007). A Branching Space-Times View on Quantum Error Correction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (3):635-652.score: 30.0
    In this paper we describe some first steps for bringing the framework of branching space-times to bear on quantum information theory. Our main application is quantum error correction. It is shown that branching space-times offers a new perspective on quantum error correction: as a supplement to the orthodox slogan, ``fight entanglement with entanglement'', we offer the new slogan, ``fight indeterminism with indeterminism''.
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  34. Konrad Fuchs (1972). The History of the Hitler Youth. Aims and Errors of a Generation. Philosophy and History 5 (2):191-192.score: 26.0
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  35. Colin Gordon (1990). History, Madness and Other Errors: A Response. History of the Human Sciences 3 (3):381-396.score: 26.0
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  36. Mike Collins (2009). The Nature and Implementation of Representation in Biological Systems. Dissertation, City University of New Yorkscore: 24.0
    I defend a theory of mental representation that satisfies naturalistic constraints. Briefly, we begin by distinguishing (i) what makes something a representation from (ii) given that a thing is a representation, what determines what it represents. Representations are states of biological organisms, so we should expect a unified theoretical framework for explaining both what it is to be a representation as well as what it is to be a heart or a kidney. I follow Millikan in explaining (i) in terms (...)
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  37. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Damasio, Descartes' Error. [REVIEW]score: 24.0
    The legacy of René Descartes' notorious dualism of mind and body extends far beyond academia into everyday thinking: "These athletes are prepared both mentally and physically," and "There's nothing wrong with your body--it's all in your mind." Even among those of us who have battled Descartes' vision, there has been a powerful tendency to treat the mind (that is to say, the brain) as the body's boss, the pilot of the ship. Falling in with this standard way of thinking, we (...)
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  38. Amit Hagar (2009). Active Fault‐Tolerant Quantum Error Correction: The Curse of the Open System. Philosophy of Science 76 (4):506-535.score: 24.0
    Relying on the universality of quantum mechanics and on recent results known as the “threshold theorems,” quantum information scientists deem the question of the feasibility of large‐scale, fault‐tolerant, and computationally superior quantum computers as purely technological. Reconstructing this question in statistical mechanical terms, this article suggests otherwise by questioning the physical significance of the threshold theorems. The skepticism it advances is neither too strong (hence is consistent with the universality of quantum mechanics) nor too weak (hence is independent of technological (...)
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  39. Babette E. Babich (2003). From Fleck's Denkstil to Kuhn's Paradigm: Conceptual Schemes and Incommensurability. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (1):75 – 92.score: 24.0
    This article argues that the limited influence of Ludwik Fleck's ideas on philosophy of science is due not only to their indirect dissemination by way of Thomas Kuhn, but also to an incommensurability between the standard conceptual framework of history and philosophy of science and Fleck's own more integratedly historico-social and praxis-oriented approach to understanding the evolution of scientific discovery. What Kuhn named "paradigm" offers a periphrastic rendering or oblique translation of Fleck's Denkstil/Denkkollektiv , a derivation that may also (...)
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  40. Roslyn Weiss (1998). Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    In this book, Roslyn Weiss contends that, contrary to prevailing notions, Plato's Crito does not show an allegiance between Socrates and the state that condemned him. Denying that the speech of the Laws represents the views of Socrates, Weiss deftly brings to light numerous indications that Socrates provides to the attentive reader that he and the Laws are not partners but antagonists in the argument and that he is singularly unimpressed by the case against escaping prison presented by the Laws. (...)
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  41. Raffaella De Rosa (2008). Material Falsity and Error in Descartes's Meditations (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 641-642.score: 24.0
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  42. Mostyn W. Jones (1994). The Roots of Imagination. Dissertation, The University of Manchesterscore: 24.0
    This work presents a new theory of imagination which tries to overcome the overly narrow perpectives that current theories take upon this enigmatic, multi-faceted phenomenon. Current theories are narrowly preoccupied with images and imagery. This creates problems in explaining (1) what imagination is, (2) how it works, and (3) what its strengths and limitations are. (1) Ordinary language identifies imagination with both imaging (image-making) and creativity, but most current theories identify imagination narrowly with imaging while neglecting creativity. Yet imaging is (...)
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  43. Grzegorz Bugajak (2004). Theology and Genetic Engineering: New Incarnation of the Old Conflict? In Ulf Görman, Willem B. Drees & Hubert Meisinger (eds.), Studies in Science and Theology, vol. 9(2003–2004), Lunds Universitet, Lund. 127–143.score: 24.0
    It is widely acknowledged among science˗and˗theology thinkers – or at least desired – that we have left behind the era of conflict between science and religion. An approach which avoids conflict by pointing out that science and religion employ two different methodologies and therefore occupy two separate magisteria, is, however, unsatisfactory for both – the advocates of a fruitful dialogue between these two realms of human activity as well as the most vigorous opponents of possible conciliation, and the latter still (...)
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  44. James Alexander (2012). The Four Points of the Compass. Philosophy 87 (01):79-107.score: 24.0
    Philosophy has four forms: wonder, faith, doubt and scepticism. These are not separate categories, but separate ideal possibilities. Modern academic philosophy has fallen, for several centuries, into an error: which is the error of supposing that philosophy is only what I call doubt. Philosophy may be doubt: indeed, it is part of my argument that this is undeniably one element of, or one possibility in, philosophy; but doubt is only one of four points of the compass. In this (...)
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  45. Matthew Sterenberg (2010). Tradition and Revolution in the Rhetoric of Analytic Philosophy. Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 161-172.score: 24.0
    It is an unsurprising but unfortunate fact that the history of twentieth-century British philosophy has been almost entirely written by British philosophers themselves. The account produced by philosophers such as G. J. Warnock, Gilbert Ryle, and A. J. Ayer, like all histories written by the winners of disciplinary struggles, amounts to a "Whig narrative" emphasizing the triumph of analytic philosophy over outdated, misguided idealist philosophy—a movement from error to truth. British philosophers built this Whig narrative around a justification (...)
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  46. Sunny Y. Auyang, From Experience to Design – The Science Behind Aspirin.score: 24.0
    How does aspirin reduce pain and inflammation? How does it prevent heart attacks? Why does it upset the stomach? How do scientists discover the answers? This article examines research and development in the history from willow bark to aspirin to “super aspirins” Celebrex and Vioxx. Scientists adopt various approaches: trial and error, laboratory experiment, clinical test, elucidation of underlying mechanisms, concept-directed research, and rational drug design. Each approach is limited, but they complement each other in unraveling the mystery (...)
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  47. Stevan Harnad, Creative Disagreement.score: 24.0
    Do scientists agree? It is not only unrealistic to suppose that they do, but probably just as unrealistic to think that they ought to. Agreement is for what is already established scientific history. The current and vital ongoing aspect of science consists of an active and often heated interaction of data, ideas and minds, in a process one might call "creative disagreement." The "scientific method" is largely derived from a reconstruction based on selective hindsight. What actually goes on has (...)
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  48. Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay & Gordon G. Brittan (2006). Acceptibility, Evidence, and Severity. Synthese 148 (2):259 - 293.score: 24.0
    The notion of a severe test has played an important methodological role in the history of science. But it has not until recently been analyzed in any detail. We develop a generally Bayesian analysis of the notion, compare it with Deborah Mayo’s error-statistical approach by way of sample diagnostic tests in the medical sciences, and consider various objections to both. At the core of our analysis is a distinction between evidence and confirmation or belief. These notions must be (...)
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  49. Eleonore Stump (1986). Penelhum on Skeptics and Fideists. Synthese 67 (1):147 - 154.score: 24.0
    Professor Penelhum has argued that there is a common error about the history of skepticism and that the exposure of this error would significantly improve our understanding of a current confusion in the philosophy of religion with regard to the issue of the rationality of religious beliefs. Penelhum considers certain contemporary philosophers of religion such as Plantinga skeptics because he reads Plantinga (for example) as arguing that religious beliefs are properly groundless in virtue of the fact that (...)
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