Search results for 'Eschatology, Jewish' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gil Anidjar (2002). "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters. Stanford University Press.score: 42.0
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from (...)
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  2. Leila Leah Bronner (2011). Journey to Heaven: Exploring Jewish Views of the Afterlife. Lambda Publishers.score: 42.0
    The Hebrew Bible: glimpses of immortality -- Early post-biblical literature: gateways to heaven and hell -- The mishnah: who will merit the world to come? -- The Talmud: what happens in the next world? -- Medieval Jewish philosophy: faith and reason -- Mysticism: reincarnation in Kabbalah -- Modernity: what do we believe? -- The Messiah: the eternal thread of hope.
     
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  3. Carlos Blanco (2013). El Pensamiento de la Apocalíptica Judía: Ensayo Filosófico-Teológico. Editorial Trotta.score: 30.0
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  4. Terence Holden (2011). Levinas, Messianism and Parody. Continuum.score: 12.0
    There is no greater testament to Emmanuel Levinas' reputation as an enigmatic thinker than in his meditations on eschatology and its relevance for contemporary thought. Levinas has come to be seen as a principal representative in Continental philosophy - alongside the likes of Heidegger, Benjamin, Adorno and Zizek - of a certain philosophical messianism, differing from its religious counterpart in being formulated apparently without appeal to any dogmatic content. To date, however, Levinas' messianism has not received the same detailed attention (...)
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  5. Daniel Rynhold (2004). Arthur Hyman, Eschatological Themes in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. (The Aquinas Lecture, 2002.) Milwaukee, Wis.: Marquette University Press, 2002. Pp. 135. $15. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (1):212-213.score: 12.0
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  6. Menachem Marc Kellner (2010). Torah in the Observatory: Gersonides, Maimonides, Song of Songs. Academic Studies Press.score: 9.0
    Providence and the rabbinic tradition -- Mosaic prophecy: Maimonides and Gersonides -- Eschatology and miracles -- Creation, miracles, revelation -- Song of Songs and Gersonides' world -- Maimonides and Gersonides on astronomy and metaphysics -- Gersonides on the Song of Songs and the nature of science -- Politics and perfection: Gersonides vs. Maimonides -- The role of the active intellect in human cognition -- Imitatio dei and the dissemination of scientific knowledge -- Moses ibn Tibbon and Gersonides on Song of (...)
     
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  7. Elena Namli, Jayne Svenungsson & Alana M. Vincent (eds.) (2014). Jewish Thought, Utopia, and Revolution. Editions Rodopi.score: 7.0
    In response to the grim realities of the present world Jewish thought has not tended to retreat into eschatological fantasy, but rather to project utopian visions precisely on to the present moment, envisioning redemptions that are concrete, immanent, and necessarily political in nature. In difficult times and through shifting historical contexts, the messianic hope in the Jewish tradition has functioned as a political vision: the dream of a peaceful kingdom, of a country to return to, or of a (...)
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  8. Elliot R. Wolfson (2006). Venturing Beyond: Law and Morality in Kabbalistic Mysticism. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    Are mysticism and morality compatible or at odds with one another? If mystical experience embraces a form of non-dual consciousness, then in such a state of mind, the regulative dichotomy so basic to ethical discretion would seemingly be transcended and the very foundation for ethical decisions undermined. Venturing Beyond - Law and Morality in Kabbalistic Mysticism is an investigation of the relationship of the mystical and moral as it is expressed in the particular tradition of Jewish mysticism known as (...)
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