Search results for 'Eschatology, Jewish' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    Gil Anidjar (2002). "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters. Stanford University Press.
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from (...)
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  2. Leila Leah Bronner (2011). Journey to Heaven: Exploring Jewish Views of the Afterlife. Lambda Publishers.
    The Hebrew Bible: glimpses of immortality -- Early post-biblical literature: gateways to heaven and hell -- The mishnah: who will merit the world to come? -- The Talmud: what happens in the next world? -- Medieval Jewish philosophy: faith and reason -- Mysticism: reincarnation in Kabbalah -- Modernity: what do we believe? -- The Messiah: the eternal thread of hope.
     
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  3. Carlos Blanco (2013). El Pensamiento de la Apocalíptica Judía: Ensayo Filosófico-Teológico. Editorial Trotta.
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  4. Jacob Taubes (2009). Occidental Eschatology. Stanford University Press.
    One of the great Jewish intellectuals of the twentieth century, Taubes published only this one book during his life, and here the English translation finally becomes available.
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  5.  2
    Alex S. Ozar (2015). Michael Wyschogrod's Messianic Zionism. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (4):606-628.
    This essay presents an integrated account of Michael Wyschogrod's Zionism as a function of his broader theological anthropology, eschatology, and carnal interpretation of Israel's election. Against Leora Batnitzky, I show that Wyschogrod's Zionism, while definitively messianic, is decidedly not fanatical or fundamentalist. Against Meir Soloveichik, I show that Wyschogrod has maintained this non-fanatical messianism consistently throughout his career, and so his pacific political prescriptions are organically at one with his vigorous calls for Jewish sovereignty over the land.
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  6.  14
    Aubrey L. Glazer (2011). Touching God: Vertigo, Exactitude, and Degrees of Devekut in the Contemporary Nondual Jewish Mysticism of R. Yitzhaq Maier Morgenstern. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 19 (2):147-192.
    Whether extrovertive, introvertive, or some further hybrid, the process of the soul touching the fullness of its divine origins is itself undergoing transformation in the twenty-first-century cultural matrices of Israel. A remarkable exemplar of devotional Hebrew cultures can be found within the hybrid networks of haredi worlds in Israel today. R. Yitzhaq Maier Morgenstern, author of Yam ha-okhmah, Netiv ayyim, and De'i okhmah le-nafshekha, is arguably the most innovative mystical voice in Israel. Why are his works resonating so strongly both (...)
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  7.  11
    Michael Zank (2012). The Heteronomy of Modern Jewish Philosophy. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):99-134.
    Abstract Proceeding from Jewish philosophy's origins in the convergence and divergence of Greek and Jewish thought and the resulting possibilities of construing Judaism and philosophy as heterogeneous or homogeneous, and ranging across the three major “ages“ or linguistic matrices of Jewish philosophizing (Hellenistic, Judeo-Arabic, and Germanic), the essay describes Jewish philosophy as an unresolvable entanglement in a dialectic of heteronomy and autonomy.
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  8.  8
    Job Y. Jindo (2011). Recontextualizing Kaufmann: His Empirical Conception of the Bible and Its Significance in Jewish Intellectual History. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 19 (2):95-129.
    This essay revisits the significance of Kaufmann's Toledot ha-emunah ha-yisre'elit in Jewish intellectual history, as its reception has hitherto been somewhat reductive. His work is generally viewed as an anti-Christian polemic with a Zionist agenda that sought to glorify the formative period of his people. A closer look at his intellectual background, as well as his theoretical framework, leads us to a different understanding of his work in general and of its alleged nationalistic features in particular. The essay shows, (...)
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  9.  31
    Elliot N. Dorff (1998). Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics. Jewish Publication Society.
    In Matters of Life and Death Elliot Dorff thoroughly addresses this unavoidable confluence of medical technology and Jewish law and ethics.
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  10.  14
    Benjamin Freedman (1999). Duty and Healing: Foundations of a Jewish Bioethic. Routledge.
    Duty and Healing positions ethical issues commonly encountered in clinical situations within Jewish law. The concept of duty is significant in exploring bioethical issues, and this book presents an authentic and non-parochial Jewish approach to bioethics, while it includes critiques of both current secular and Jewish literatures. Among the issues the book explores are the role of family in medical decision-making, the question of informed consent as a personal religious duty, and the responsibilities of caretakers. The exploration (...)
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  11. Norbert M. Samuelson (2001). Rethinking Ethics in the Light of Jewish Thought and the Life Sciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):209 - 233.
    Judaism in the twentieth century began to return to its scriptural, communal roots after a centuries-long detour through Greek-influenced natural philosophy, a detour during which science and ethics were assumed to be partners and Jewish ethics drew heavily on natural philosophy and science. Twentieth-century philosophical ethics and science, particularly biological science, have developed in such a way as to make any continuation of that historical partnership problematic. This is not altogether regrettable because the problematizing of this long-standing partnership has (...)
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  12.  4
    Richard J. Bernstein (1996). Hannah Arendt and the Jewish Question. The MIT Press.
    "Bernstein argues that many themes that emerged in the course of Arendt's attempts tounderstand specifically Jewish issues shaped her thinking about politics in general and the life ofthe mind.
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  13.  10
    David Patterson (2012). Genocide in Jewish Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    1. Introduction: a name, not an essence -- 2. Why Jewish thought and what makes it Jewish? -- 3. Deadly philosophical abstraction -- 4. The stranger in your midst -- 5. Nefesh: the soul as flesh and blood -- 6. The environmentalist contribution to genocide -- 7. Torture -- 8. Hunger and homelessness -- 9. Philosophy, religion, and genocide -- 10. A concluding reflection on body and soul.
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  14.  14
    Charles Harry Manekin (ed.) (2007). Medieval Jewish Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    Medieval Jewish intellectuals living in Muslim and Christian lands were strongly concerned to recover what they regarded as a ‘lost’ Jewish philosophical tradition. As part of this project they transmitted and produced many philosophical and scientific works and commentaries, as well as philosophical commentary on scripture, in Judaeo-Arabic and Hebrew, the principal literary languages of medieval Jewry. This volume presents new or revised translations of seven prominent medieval Jewish rationalists: Saadia Gaon, Solomon ibn Gabirol, (...)
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  15.  28
    Manuel Losada‐Sierra & John Mandalios (2015). A Time for the Marginal: Levinas and Metz on Biblical Time. Heythrop Journal 56 (3):411-423.
    In the modern consideration of historical time, reason is the driving force of progress through a homogenous, linear and continuum time. In fact, during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries humanity was witnessing a history of progress in which it appeared that history was progressing towards a better world. However, the tragedies of the twentieth century indicate the opposite. Western reason proved unable to stop the barbarism of war. At the heart of this panorama, according to Emmanuel Levinas and Johann Baptist (...)
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  16.  3
    Gideon Ofrat (2001). The Jewish Derrida. Syracuse University Press.
    A fresh look at the French philosopher which argues that Derrida cannot be understood without considering the Jewish dimension of his thought.
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  17. Gregg Stern (2009). Philosophy and Rabbinic Culture: Jewish Interpretation and Controversy in Medieval Languedoc. Routledge.
    Jewish learning and thought in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: implications of original philosophic work and the diffusion of philosophic learning in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: Jewish contacts with Christian intellectuals and Jewish thought regarding Christianity -- Meiri's transformation of Talmud study: philosophic spirituality in a halakhic key -- 1300: on the eve of the controversy -- 1300-1304: knowledge and authority in dispute -- 1304-1306: the controversy peaks -- The effects of the expulsion: Jewish philosophic culture in Roussillon and (...)
     
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  18.  6
    Steven M. Nadler (2001). Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind. Oxford University Press.
    Why was the great philosopher Spinoza expelled from his Portuguese-Jewish community in Amsterdam? Nadler's investigation of this simple question gives fascinating new perspectives on Spinoza's thought and the Jewish religious and philosophical tradition from which it arose.
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  19. Markus N. A. Bockmuehl (2000/2003). Jewish Law in Gentile Churches: Halakhah and the Beginning of Christian Public Ethics. Baker Academic.
    Halakhah and ethics in the Jesus tradition -- Matthew's divorce texts in the light of pre-rabbinic Jewish law -- Let the dead bury their dead : Jesus and the law revisited -- James, Israel, and Antioch -- Natural law in Second Temple Judaism -- Natural law in the New Testament? -- The Noachide commandments and New Testament ethics -- The beginning of Christian public ethics : from Luke to Aristides and Diognetus -- Jewish and Christian public ethics in (...)
     
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  20. Daniel H. Frank, Oliver Leaman & Charles Harry Manekin (eds.) (2000). The Jewish Philosophy Reader. Routledge.
    The Jewish Philosophy Reader is the first comprehensive anthology of classic writings on Jewish philosophy from the Bible to postmodernism. The Reader is clearly divided into four separate parts: Foundations and First Principles, Medieval and Renaissance Jewish Philosophy, Modern Jewish Thought, and Contemporary Jewish Philosophy. Each part is clearly introduced by the editors. The readings featured are representative writings of each era listed above and are from the following major thinkers: Abrabanel, Baeck, Bergman, Borowitz, Buber, (...)
     
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  21.  20
    Herbert A. Davidson (1987). Proofs for Eternity, Creation, and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The central debate of natural theology among medieval Muslims and Jews concerned whether or not the world was eternal. Opinions divided sharply on this issue because the outcome bore directly on God's relationship with the world: eternity implies a deity bereft of will, while a world with a beginning leads to the contrasting picture of a deity possessed of will. In this exhaustive study of medieval Islamic and Jewish arguments for eternity, creation, and the existence of God, Herbert (...)
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  22.  20
    Martin Kavka (2004). Jewish Messianism and the History of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Jewish Messianism and the History of Philosophy contests the ancient opposition between Athens and Jerusalem by retrieval of the concept of meontology - the doctrine of nonbeing - in one strand of the Jewish philosophical and theological tradition. This book offers new readings of important figures in contemporary Continental philosophy, critiquing arguments about the role of lived religion in the thought of Jacques Derrida, the role of Greek philosophy in the thought of Emmanuel Levinas, and the ethical import (...)
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  23. David Novak (1992). Jewish Social Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Leading contemporary Jewish thinker David Novak has here compiled ten of his essays on a variety of issues in Jewish ethics. Drawing constantly on classical Jewish tradition, Novak also looks at a wide range of modern critical scholarship on the ancient sources. He aims to point out certain common features of Jewish and Christian ethics and the normative implications of this overlapping of traditions; he assumes the reality of a "Judeo-Christian ethic," while refusing to minimize the (...)
     
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  24.  23
    Michael J. Harris (2003). Divine Command Ethics: Jewish and Christian Perspectives. Routledgecurzon.
    This book analyses the response of the classic texts of Jewish tradition to Plato's 'Euthyphro dilemma': does God freely determine morality, or is morality independent of God?
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  25.  11
    Eric Lee Goodfield (2010). The Jewish Question and Beyond: Universalism and Dialectic in the Confrontations of Marx, Zion and Intifada. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):98-112.
    The paper represents a consideration of the influence of G.W.F. Hegel’s dialectical method on Marx’s analysis of the debate over Jewish political rights in 19th Century Germany. As a follow on, I will consider how Marx’s analytical insights and perversions on “The Jewish Ques- tion” may provide us with guidance towards an enriched understanding of the currently confounded standoff be- tween the State of Israel and the Palestinian indepen- dence movement.
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  26.  12
    Isaac Husik (2002). A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy. Dover Publications.
    In this enlightening study, a noted scholar elucidates the distinguishing characteristics of the works of several Jewish thinkers of the Middle Ages. In addition to summaries of the main arguments and teachings of Moses Maimonides, Isaac Israeli, Judah Halevi, Abraham Ibn Daud, Hillel ben Samuel, Levi ben Gerson, Joseph Albo, and many others, the author offers insightful analyses and commentary. Of particular value to beginners, this volume is also an ever-relevant resource for many issues of scholarly debate.
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  27.  11
    Heidi M. Ravven & Lenn Evan Goodman (eds.) (2002). Jewish Themes in Spinoza's Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    CHAPTER 1 Introduction HEIDI M. RAVVEN AND LENN E. GOODMAN The attitudes of Jewish thinkers toward Spinoza have defined a fault line between traditionalist ...
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  28. Louis Jacobs (2000). A Tree of Life: Diversity, Flexibility, and Creativity in Jewish Law. Littman Library of Jewish Civilization.
    This study of the Jewish legal system (the Halakhah) demonstrates that the law embraces every corner of life.
     
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  29.  14
    Byron L. Sherwin (2000). Jewish Ethics for the Twenty-First Century: Living in the Image of God. Syracuse University Press.
    He shows, for example, how the ethics of Judaism and the ethics of Jews often are at odds, how the Judeo-Christian ethic is an obsolete myth, and how Jewish and ...
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  30. Alexander Altmann, Allan Arkush, Alfred L. Ivry, Elliot R. Wolfson & Institute of Jewish Studies (1998). Perspectives on Jewish Thought and Mysticism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text (...)
     
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  32.  16
    Oliver Leaman (1995). Evil and Suffering in Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The problems of evil and suffering have been extensively discussed in Jewish philosophy, and much of the discussion has centred on the Book of Job. In this study Oliver Leaman poses two questions: how can a powerful and caring deity allow terrible things to happen to obviously innocent people, and why have the Jewish people been so harshly treated throughout history, given their status as the chosen people? He explores these issues through an analysis of the views of (...)
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  33.  12
    Mohammed Ghaly (2014). Pre‐Modern Islamic Medical Ethics and Graeco‐Islamic‐Jewish Embryology. Bioethics 28 (2):49-58.
    This article examines the, hitherto comparatively unexplored, reception of Greek embryology by medieval Muslim jurists. The article elaborates on the views attributed to Hippocrates (d. ca. 375 BC), which received attention from both Muslim physicians, such as Avicenna (d. 1037), and their Jewish peers living in the Muslim world including Ibn Jumayʽ (d. ca. 1198) and Moses Maimonides (d. 1204). The religio-ethical implications of these Graeco-Islamic-Jewish embryological views were fathomed out by the two medieval Muslim jurists Shihāb al-Dīn (...)
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  34.  3
    Daniel Marguerat (1999). La “troisième quête” du Jésus de l'histoire. Recherches de Science Religieuse 87 (3):397-421.
    Il est toujours tentant de diviser l'histoire de la recherche en époques, surtout lorsqu'un groupe ou une tendance s'en fait le repère avec la « troi­sième quête », fût-ce au prix de pratiques exégétiques et de présupposés méthodologiques pour le moins discutables . Divers modèles et figures du Christ surgissent de cette quête multi­forme Jésus philosophe cynique itinérant, sapiential, homme de l'Esprit, prophète de la restauration d'Israêl, militant du changement social...), ce qui ne suffit pourtant pas à jeter le soupçon (...)
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  35.  9
    David Novak (1989). Jewish-Christian Dialogue: A Jewish Justification. Oxford University Press.
    Many studies written about the Jewish-Christian relationship are primarily historical overviews that focus on the Jewish background of Christianity, the separation of Christianity from Judiasm, or the medieval disputations between the two faiths. This book is one of the first studies to examine the relationship from a philosophical and theological viewpoint. Carefully drawing on Jewish classical sources, Novak argues that there is actual justification for the new relationship between Judaism and Christianity from within Jewish religious tradition. (...)
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  36.  23
    Geoffrey W. Dennis (2008). The Use of Water as a Medium for Altered States of Consciousness in Early Jewish Mysticism: A Cross-Disciplinary Analysis. Anthropology of Consciousness 19 (1):84-106.
    This article combines the disciplines of textual/linguistic analysis, anthropology, and perceptual psychology to examine selected ancient Jewish mystical texts that claim to describe the praxis for ascents into heaven and encounters with angelic spirits in order to reconstruct the psychosocial context of these literary works. Specifically, the article examines Hekhalot or "Divine Palaces" texts that deal with hydromancy, giving attention to their mythic–symbolic assumptions, their described preparatory and triggering rituals, and their accounts of the ASC (altered states of consciousness) (...)
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  37.  4
    Menachem Marc Kellner (1986). Dogma in Medieval Jewish Thought: From Maimonides to Abravanel. Oxford University Press.
    This study charts the development of creed formulation in Judaism from its inception with Moses Maimonides (1135-1204) to the beginning of the 16th century, when systematic attention to the problem disappeared from the agenda of Jewish intellectuals. Kellner describes, analyzes, and compares the dogmatic systems of Maimonides, Duran, Crescas, Albo, Bibago, Abravanel, and many others, and provides English translations of several previously unexamined or untranslated texts.
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  38.  20
    David Novak (2008). The Universality of Jewish Ethics: A Rejoinder to Secularist Critics. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):181-211.
    Jewish ethics like Judaism itself has often been charged with being "particularistic," and in modernity it has been unfavorably compared with the universality of secular ethics. This charge has become acute philosophically when the comparison is made with the ethics of Kant. However, at this level, much of the ethical rejection of Jewish particularism, especially its being beholden to a God who is above the universe to whom this God prescribes moral norms and judges according to them, is (...)
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  39.  4
    Alan Jotkowitz (2014). The Seminal Contribution of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein to the Development of Modern Jewish Medical Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):285-309.
    The purpose of this essay is to show how, on a wide variety of issues, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein broke new ground with the established Orthodox rabbinic consensus and blazed a new trail in Jewish medical ethics. Rabbi Feinstein took power away from the rabbis and let patients decide their treatment, he opened the door for a Jewish approach to palliative care, he supported the use of new technologies to aid in reproduction, he endorsed altruistic living organ donation and (...)
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  40.  4
    Sandu Frunza (2010). Jewish Philosophy and the Metaphor of Returning to Jerusalem. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (13):128-138.
    There are multiple manners of defining Jewish philosophy. The controversies woven around this topic seem to leave the issue perpetually open instead of determining a unique and final perspective. However, this outcome is indubitably an indication of the fact that Jewish philosophy proposes a privileged manner of understanding Judaism through the encounter between philosophy and religion as a founding polar- ity of a creative tradition. One of the ways of asserting this polarity has gained the symbolic dimension of (...)
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  41.  4
    Mihaela Mudure (2010). Moshe Idel, Ascension on High in Jewish Mysticism: Pillars, Lines, Ladders. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (18):237-238.
    Moshe Idel, Ascension on High in Jewish Mysticism: Pillars, Lines, Ladders Budapest:Central European University Press, 2005.
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  42.  11
    Doron Shultziner (2006). A Jewish Conception of Human Dignity: Philosophy and Its Ethical Implications for Israeli Supreme Court Decisions. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (4):663 - 683.
    This paper depicts the meanings of human dignity as they unfold and evolve in the Bible and the "Halakhah". I posit that three distinct features of a Jewish conception of human dignity can be identified in contrast to core characteristics of a liberal conception of human dignity. First, the original source of human dignity is not intrinsic to the human being but extrinsic, namely in God. Second, it is argued that the "dignity of the people" has precedence over personal (...)
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  43.  3
    Philip Wexler (2010). Mystical Jewish Sociology. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (18):206-217.
    The paper begins by engaging Mircea Eliade’s undervaluation of the importance of classical sociology of religion, namely, Durkheim and Weber, and goes on to show how much they share with him, particularly with regard to a critique of modern European civilization, and of the foundational importance of religion in society. This “other”, non-positivist, non-reductionist face of Durkheim and Weber is elaborated by showing their religious, even “primordial” approaches to the religious bases of society and culture. Eliade’s criticism of sociology is (...)
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  44.  3
    Stefan-Sebastian Maftei (2010). “Sonship” and its Relevance for Jewish and Non-Jewish Mystical Literatures. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (23):141-153.
    Moshe Idel, Ben: Sonship and Jewish Mysticism (The Kogod Library of Judaic Studies 5), London/New York: Continuum, 2007, 725 pgs.
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  45.  3
    Codruta Cuceu (2010). Nicolae Kallós, A Dialogue on Jewish Identity, Holocaust, and Communism as Personal Experiences. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):250-252.
    Nicolae Kallós, A dialogue on Jewish identity, Holocaust, and Communism as personal Experiences Registered and edited by Sandu Frunzã, The Publishing House of the Axis Foundation, Iaoi, 2003.
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  46.  3
    Mihai Murariu (2014). Historical Eschatology, Political Utopia and European Modernity. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 13 (37):73-92.
    The powerful impact which Christianity has had on the distinct culture of the Occident can hardly be overstated. Indeed, its tremendous influence in virtually every single aspect of the European existence is ultimately recognisable in many secular quarters. In order to understand the link between the project of modernity and European Christendom and its state in the present, it is necessary to trace the development of several key features. Thus, the paper consists of two major parts dealing with: 1) the (...)
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  47.  5
    Stephen Buetow (2003). The Ethics of Public Consultation in Health Care: An Orthodox Jewish Perspective. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 11 (2):151-160.
    New Zealand and United Kingdom governments have set new directives for increased consultation with the public about health care. Set against a legacy of modest success with past engagement with public consultations, this paper considers potentially adverse ethical implications of the new directives. Drawing on experiences from New Zealand and the United Kingdom, and on an Orthodox Jewish perspective, the paper seeks to answer two questions: What conditions can compromise the ethics of public consultation? How can the public respond (...)
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  48.  2
    Yonatan Glaser & Yehuda Bar Shalom (2010). On the Social and Existential Meaning of Jewish Mysticism Today: Pitfalls and Potential. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):43-57.
    The authors review the profound and diverse ways in which mysticism is embedded in and influences belief, lifestyle, identity and politics in Jewish life in Israel and North America. They outline some existential and cultural dimensions of the conditions in which this phenomena flourish, specifically relating to the condition of post-modernity. The seeming dominance of mysticism over more rational forms of religious belief and behavior is explored. The opposite ideational and historic trends within Jewish mysticism as they relate (...)
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  49.  7
    Alan Revering (2005). Eschatology in the Political Theory of Michael Walzer. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (1):91 - 117.
    This essay examines the relevance of eschatological themes to the political theory of Michael Walzer. A distinctive eschatological hope is identified, which functions as a guide to thought throughout Walzer's writings, even though he seldom expresses it (and sometimes denies it). This analysis of Walzer's work demonstrates that eschatology is relevant to the contemporary discussion of justice, and conversely, that contemporary political theory can be a guide for the construction and evaluation of theological doctrines of eschatology. Any eschatology that enters (...)
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  50.  2
    H. A. Alexander (2000). Education in the Jewish State. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):491-507.
    This essay argues that schooling in Israel is tied too closely to ideology. This results in an indoctrinary orientation that contributes to divisiveness and imperils Israeli democracy. After reviewing and critiquing the roots of this orientation, I advance an alternative that understands education as an agent of the good rather than ideology. Israeli schooling requires a vision of goodness broad enough to encompass competing conceptions of Jewish life espoused by the majority as well as non-Jewish orientations affirmed by (...)
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