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  1. Espen Dahl (2012). Towards a Phenomenology of Painting: Husserl's Horizon and Rothko's Abstraction. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 41 (3):229-245.
     
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  2.  43
    Espen Dahl (2011). On Morality of Speech: Cavell's Critique of Derrida. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):81-101.
    This article tries to bring out the implication of Cavell’s critical comments on Derrida, clustered around Cavell’s charge that deconstruction entails a flight from the ordinary. Cavell’s and Derrida’s different readings of Austin’s ordinary language philosophy provide a common ground for elaborating their respective positions. Their writings are at once the closest but also the most divergent when addressing the moral implication of speech, or more precisely, when addressing their understanding of responsibility and voice. Employing Derrida’s so-called ‘double reading’ as (...)
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  3.  32
    Espen Dahl (2010). On Acknowledgement and Cavell's Unacknowledged Theological Voice. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):931-945.
    This article argues that Cavell's key concept of acknowledgement is of great theological significance. Acknowledgement is meant as a particular interpretation of knowledge, which emphasises the personal responsiveness and responsibility to the human other and to the world. As Cavell himself indicates, acknowledgement also overlaps with faith. However, what such acknowledgement of God amounts to, is not yet satisfactorily understood in the growing literature on Cavell. This article argues that Cavell's treatment of confessions (Augustine, Wittgenstein) and acceptance of promise (Luther) (...)
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    Espen Dahl (2012). Receiving Newman. Formalism, Minimalism, and Their Philosophical Preconditions. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (42).
    Despite the divide between American formalism and theoreticians of minimalism, Barnett Newman’s art received great acclaim from both schools of thought. Attempting to unearth the philosophical preconditions of this strange constellation, this article argues that the closeness between minimalism and formalism is due to their mutual reliance upon phenomenology and ordinary language philosophy. However, their proximity also conveys their distance, since they imply different interpretations and applications of the philosophical schools in question. Such theoretical differences shed light on Newman’s paintings: (...)
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    Espen Dahl (2016). Job and the Problem of Physical Pain: A Phenomenological Reading. Modern Theology 32 (1):45-59.
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    Espen Dahl (2014). Felix Ó. Murchadha: A Phenomenology of Christian Life: Glory and Night. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (1):103-106.
    Over the last several decades, the continental phenomenological tradition has been marked by what has been termed “the theological turn.” Major figures such as Levinas, Henry, Marion, and Lacoste have moved beyond the restrictions of Husserl’s and Heidegger’s phenomenology and have opened up phenomenology to distinctly theological themes. But such a “turn” has not been uncontested. The relation between phenomenology and theology has been at the heart of the discussion, raising the question of what constitutes philosophical description, as well as (...)
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    Espen Dahl (2011). Cavell, Companionship, and Christian Theology – By Peter Dula. Modern Theology 27 (3):526-528.
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    Espen Dahl (2013). Humility and Generosity: On the Horizontality of Divine Givenness. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 55 (3).
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    Espen Dahl (2007). Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Revelation. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 48 (4):479-496.
    SummaryThis article has been concerned with the possibilities and limitations in two different approaches to general revelation prevalent in current philosophy of religion. Werner Jeanrond follows Rahner in his emphasis of experience in encountering revelation, but he wants to supplement Rahner's contribution with critical resources found in Paul Ricœur's hermeneutics. This suggestion, however, calls for a more thorough investigation of the relation between experience and interpretation, phenomenology and hermeneutics with regard to revelation. Ricœur's own accounts of revelation focus on readers' (...)
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  10. Espen Dahl (2011). Finitude and Original Sin: Cavell's Contribution to Theology. Modern Theology 27 (3):497-516.
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  11. Espen Dahl (2014). Stanley Cavell, Religion, and Continental Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    The American philosopher Stanley Cavell is a secular Jew who by his own admission is obsessed with Christ, yet his outlook on religion in general is ambiguous. Probing the secular and the sacred in Cavell’s thought, Espen Dahl explains that Cavell, while often parting ways with Christianity, cannot dismiss it either. Focusing on Cavell's work as a whole, but especially on his recent engagement with Continental philosophy, Dahl brings out important themes in Cavell’s philosophy and his conversation with theology.
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  12. Espen Dahl (2014). Stanley Cavell, Religion, and Continental Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    The American philosopher Stanley Cavell is a secular Jew who by his own admission is obsessed with Christ, yet his outlook on religion in general is ambiguous. Probing the secular and the sacred in Cavell’s thought, Espen Dahl explains that Cavell, while often parting ways with Christianity, cannot dismiss it either. Focusing on Cavell's work as a whole, but especially on his recent engagement with Continental philosophy, Dahl brings out important themes in Cavell’s philosophy and his conversation with theology.
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