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  1. Espen Hammer (2011). Hegel on the Modern Arts by Rutter, Benjamin. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):334-336.
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  2. Espen Hammer (2011). Philosophy and Temporality From Kant to Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. The historicity of time; 2. Modern temporality; 3. Two responses to the time of modernity; 4. Hegel's temporalization of the absolute; 5. Schopenhauer and transcendence; 6. Time and myth in early Nietzsche; 7. Recurrence and authenticity: the later Nietzsche; 8. Heidegger on boredom and modernity; 9. A modernist critique of postmodern temporality; Conclusion.
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  3. Espen Hammer (2010). Review of Markus Gabriel, Slavoj Žižek, Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).
  4. Espen Hammer (2008). Heidegger's Theory of Boredom. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29 (1):199-225.
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  5. Espen Hammer (ed.) (2007). German Idealism: Contemporary Perspectives. Routledge.
    This outstanding collection of specially commissioned chapters examines German idealism from several angles and assesses the renewed interest in the subject ...
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  6. Espen Hammer (2007). The Tragedy of Finitude: Dilthey's Hermeneutics of Life. Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):862-863.
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  7. Espen Hammer (2006). Adorno and the Political. Routledge.
    Theodor Adorno was one of the foremost radical thinkers of the Twentieth century. Critic of the Enlightenment, liberalism and modernity, he was the architect behind the famous Frankfurt School of Critical Theory and his work ranged over philosophy, social and cultural theory, art and music. In this lucid book, Espen Hammer critically considers and defends Adorno's most important contribution: his political thought and it contemporary relevance. Espen Hammer examines the background to Adorno's thought in the work of Kierkegaard, Marx, Weber (...)
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  8. Espen Hammer (2006). Cavell and Political Romanticism. In Andrew John Norris (ed.), The Claim to Community: Essays on Stanley Cavell and Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
     
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  9. Espen Hammer (2005). Minimal Theologies: Critiques of Secular Reason in Adorno and Levinas. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 134.
     
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  10. Espen Hammer (2004). Being Bored: Heidegger on Patience and Melancholy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):277 – 295.
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  11. Espen Hammer (2003). The Legacy of German Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):521 – 535.
  12. Espen Hammer (2002). Review of Jay Bernstein, Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).
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  13. Espen Hammer (2002). Stanley Cavell: Skepticism, Subjectivity, and the Ordinary. Polity.
  14. Espen Hammer (2000). Adorno and Extreme Evil. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (4):75-93.
    By comparing Adorno's conception of evil with those of Kant and Levinas, it is argued that the commitment to a notion of materialist transcendence, which Adorno introduces as a philosophical response to Auschwitz, is compatible with an equally strong commitment to philosophical modernity and autonomy. Whereas Kant's moral theology, on the one hand, proceeds in a too immanent fashion, and Levinas's heterology, on the other, in seeking to explode ontology, denies the conditions of thought's rational responsiveness, Adorno succeeds in combining (...)
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  15. Espen Hammer (2000). Heidegger's Temporal Idealism. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 102.
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  16. Espen Hammer (2000). Minding the World: Adorno's Critique of Idealism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (1):71-92.
    Jürgen Habermas' view that Adorno's thinking is characterized by a commitment to a philosophy of consciousness, and that therefore the only alternative to identitarian reason is to appeal to an intuitive competence operating beyond the range of conceptual thought, it is arged (1) that Adorno conceptualizes the modern epistemic subject (the subject of a philosophy of consciousness) as based on a reification, and (2) that he denies the possibility of a concept-transcendent (foundationalist) constraint on judgments. In seeking to demonstrate against (...)
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  17. Espen Hammer (2000). The Man Without Content. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 104.
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  18. Espen Hammer (2000). The Touch of Art: Adorno and the Sublime. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 1 (2).
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  19. Espen Hammer (1997). Romanticism Revisited. Inquiry 40 (2):225 – 242.
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  20. Espen Hammer (1995). Reclaiming the Ordinary: Towards a Critique of Discourse Ethics. Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    The goal of this dissertation is to provide a critique of Jurgen Habermas's communication-theoretic proposal for a discourse ethics. In doing so, I confront the theory of communicative rationality with the pronounced intention of letting discourse ethics take, as Habermas puts it, its orientation for an intersubjective interpretation of the categorical imperative from Hegel's theory of recognition. My objections to this attempt to provide a critical theory with normative grounds generally relate to what I see as a too excessive formalism, (...)
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