Search results for 'Eternal Recurrence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nadeem J. Z. Hussain, Eternal Recurrence and Nihilism: Adding Weight to the Unbearable Lightness of Action.
    (Version 2.4) I have argued elsewhere for ascribing an error theory about all normative and evaluative judgements to Nietzsche. Such a nihilism brings with it a puzzle: how could we—or at least the select few of us being addressed by Nietzsche—continue in the face of this nihilism? This is a philosophical puzzle and so, defeasibly, an interpretive puzzle. If there is no theory it would make sense for Nietzsche to have about how the select few could go on, then this (...)
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  2. Milic Capek (1960). The Theory of Eternal Recurrence in Modern Philosophy of Science, with Special Reference to C. S. Peirce. Journal of Philosophy 57 (9):289-296.
    The cyclical theory f time, which is better known under the name of the 'theory of eternal recurrence,' is usually associated with certain ancient thinkers--in particular, Pythagoreans and Stoics. The most famous among those who have tried to revive the theory in the modern era is unquestionably Friedrich Nietzsche. It is less well known that the theory was defended also by C.S. Peirce and, as late as 1927, by the French historian of science, Abel Rey. The contemporary discussion (...)
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  3.  15
    Gabriel Zamosc (2015). Life, Death, and Eternal Recurrence in Nietzsche's Zarathustra. The Agonist 8 (1&2).
    -/- This paper offers a preliminary interpretation of Nietzsche’s doctrine of Eternal Recurrence, according to which the doctrine constitutes a parable that, speaking of what is permanent in life, praises and justifies all that is impermanent. What is permanent, what always recurs, is the will to power or to self-overcoming that is the fundamental engine of all life. The operating mechanism of such a will consists in prompting the living to undergo transformations or transitory deaths, after which this (...)
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  4. Philip J. Kain (2007). Nietzsche, Eternal Recurrence, and the Horror of Existence. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (1):49-63.
    Nietzsche believed in the horror of existence—in a world filled with meaningless suffering. He also believed in eternal recurrence—that our lives will repeat infinitely and that in each life every detail will be exactly the same. Furthermore, it was not enough that eternal recurrence simply be accepted—Nietzsche demanded that it be loved. Thus the philosopher who introduces eternal recurrence is the very same philosopher who also believes in the horror of existence—a paradox that is (...)
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  5.  9
    John Krummel (1996). The Eternal Recurrence of the Same as the Gift of Difference: Naming the Enigma, the Enigma of Names. PoMo Magazine 2 (1):31-46.
    Published in PoMo Magazine vol. 2, nr. 1 (Spring/Summer 1996) during my years as a grad student at the New School. I examine Nietzsche's presentation of the eternal recurrence, and discuss its interpretations by Heidegger, Bataille, Derrida, Klossowski, Stambaugh, and Vattimo. I will be returning to Nietzsche in the future.
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  6.  21
    Philip J. Kain (1983). Nietzsche, Skepticism, and Eternal Recurrence. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):365 - 387.
    FOR NIETZSCHE, THERE IS NO TRUTH. WHAT THEN ARE WE TO SAY OF HIS DOCTRINES OF WILL TO POWER AND ETERNAL RECURRENCE WHICH SEEM TO BE HELD AS TRUTHS? THEY TOO ARE ILLUSIONS. BUT, IF SO, HOW CAN ONE HOLD THAT THESE ILLUSIONS ARE TO BE PREFERRED TO OTHER ILLUSIONS? BECAUSE THE HIGHEST STATE IS TO BE THE SOURCE OF ALL VALUE AND MEANING ONESELF WITHOUT RELYING ON AN INDEPENDENT STANDARD OF TRUTH.
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  7.  22
    Philip J. Kain (2004). Nietzsche, the Kantian Self, and Eternal Recurrence. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):225-238.
    Nietzsche’s concept of the self grows out of Kant—and then attempts to subvert Kant. Nietzsche agrees that a unified subject is a necessary presupposition for ordered experience to be possible. But instead of a Kantian unified self, Nietzsche develops a conception of the self of the sort that we have come to call postmodern. He posits a composite bundle of drives that become unified only through organization. This subject is unified, it is just that its unity is forged, constructed, brought (...)
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  8. Arnold Zuboff (1980). Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence. In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), Nietzsche: A Collection of Critical Essays. 343-357.
    I critically examine Nietzsche’s argument in The Will to Power that all the detailed events of the world are repeating infinite times (on account of the merely finite possible arrangements of forces that constitute the world and the inevitability with which any arrangement of force must bring about its successors). Nietzsche celebrated this recurrence because of the power of belief in it to bring about a revaluation of values focused wholly on the value of one’s endlessly repeating life. Belief (...)
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  9.  61
    Lawrence J. Hatab (2005). Nietzsche's Life Sentence: Coming to Terms with Eternal Recurrence. Routledge.
    In this book, Lawrence Hatab provides an accessible and provocative exploration of one of the best-known and still most puzzling aspects of Nietzsche's thought: eternal recurrence, the claim that life endlessly repeats itself identically in every detail. Hatab argues that eternal recurrence can and should be read literally, in just the way Nietzsche described it in the texts. The book offers a readable treatment of most of the core topics in Nietzsche's philosophy, all discussed in the (...)
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  10.  31
    John Vanderheide (2015). A Standstill in Desire: Schelling, Nietzsche, Deleuze and the Idea of Eternal Recurrence. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 19 (1):13-23.
    This essay explores the ways in which the idiosyncratic onto-theogony of Friedrich Schelling's 1815 version of The Ages of the World anticipates Gilles Deleuze’s equally idiosyncratic interpretation of Friedrich Nietzsche’s doctrine of eternal recurrence. As I argue, Schelling’s work presents a sophisticated theory of being and time, a complex account of the genesis of actuality from within a differentiated transcendental field, and a reworking of the doctrine of Ideas, all of which together project a conception of reality as (...)
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  11.  54
    Bert Olivier (2007). Nietzsche, Immortality, Singularity and Eternal Recurrence. South African Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):70-84.
    Joan Copjec has shown that modernity is privy to a notion of immortality all its own – one that differs fundamentally from any counterpart entertained in Greek antiquity or the Christian Middle Ages. She points to Blumenberg and Lefort as thinkers who have construed this concept in its modern guise in different ways, and ultimately opts for Lefort's paradoxical understanding of immortality as the ‘transcending of time, within time' before elaborating on a corresponding notion in Lacan's work. It can be (...)
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  12.  49
    Lester H. Hunt (1993). The Eternal Recurrence and Nietzsche's Ethic of Virtue. International Studies in Philosophy 25 (2):3-11.
    What I would like to try to show here, to the extent that I can do so briefly, is that Nietzsche's doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same things is - whatever else it might be in addition to this - an ethical idea. Considering it as such, I will argue, promises to shed light both on the content of Nietzsche's ethics and on the idea of recurrence.
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  13.  16
    S. A. Paphitis (2009). The Doctrine of Eternal Recurrence and its Significance with Respect to On the Genealogy of Morals. South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):189-198.
    Reading the writings of Nietzsche is somewhat like putting together a large and complex jigsaw puzzle. In this paper I aim to show how two pieces of Nietzsche’s puzzle fit together: the first piece being the Doctrine of Eternal Recurrence; and the second piece being On the Genealogy of Morals. In order to see how these two pieces lock in to one another we must understand that Nietzsche’s great love of fate – his ‘Amor Fati’ – is what (...)
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  14.  38
    Philip J. Kain (2007). Eternal Recurrence and the Categorical Imperative. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):105-116.
    The question has been raised whether Nietzsche intends eternal recurrence to be like a categorical imperative. The obvious objection to understanding eternal recurrence as like a categorical imperative isthat for a categorical imperative to make any sense, for moral obligation to make any sense, it must be possible for individuals to change themselves. And Nietzsche denies that individuals can changethemselves. Magnus thinks the determinism “implicit in the doctine of the eternal recurrence of the same (...)
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  15.  29
    Scott Jenkins (2012). Time and Personal Identity in Nietzsche's Theory of Eternal Recurrence. Philosophy Compass 7 (3):208-217.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s theory of eternal recurrence is an essential part of his mature philosophy, but the theory’s metaphysical commitments and practical implications are both obscure. In this essay I consider only the metaphysical elements of the theory, with the aim of determining whether it is possible that we live our lives infinitely many times, as the theory maintains. I argue that the possibility of eternal recurrence turns on issues in personal identity and the metaphysics of time. (...)
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  16.  24
    Rose Pfeffer (1965). Eternal Recurrence in Nietzsche's Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):276 - 300.
    Approaching the idea from three viewpoints, The author contends that eternal recurrence is a central and unifying theme in nietzsche's thought. She first considers its scientific basis, Arguing for a reinterpretation of the doctrine because nietzsche did not subscribe to the classical atomism of his time. She then considers the idea in its metaphysical perspective: it represents a repudiation of platonism and an affirmation of life. Finally, Urging the unity of the metaphysical and the ethical in nietzsche's philosophy, (...)
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  17.  12
    Peter Bornedal (2006). Eternal Recurrence in Inner-Mental-Life. Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):104-165.
    The essay introduces an interpretation of Nietzsche's Eternal-Recurrence-Thought distinct from traditional 'cosmological' as well as 'ethical' interpretations. The interpretation suggests that eternal recurrence is a conceptualization of intellectual and volitional processes. External recurrence is understood as a concept articulating peculiarities about mental processes related to knowledge and pleasure.Der Aufsatz stellt ein Interpretation von Nietzsches Gedanken der Ewigen Wiederkunft vor, die weder 'kosmologisch' noch 'ethisch' sein möchte. Diese Interpretation hält die Ewige Wiederkunft für eine Konzeptualisierung von (...)
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  18.  7
    Michael Steven Green (2013). Eternal Recurrence in a Neo-Kantian Context. Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 54 (128):459-473.
    Neste ensaio, argumento que qualquer um que adotasse um falsificacionismo do tipo que tenho atribuído a Nietzsche se sentiria atraído pela doutrina do eterno retorno. Para Nietzsche, pensar o 'vir a ser' revelado por meio dos sentidos significa falsificá-lo por meio do 'ser'. Mas o eterno retorno oferece a possibilidade de pensar o 'vir a ser' sem falsificação. Em seguida, argumento que qualquer um que mantenha o falsificacionismo de Nietzsche veria na ação humana um conflito entre o 'ser' e o (...)
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  19.  9
    Jonathan R. Cohen (1996). Born to Affirm the Eternal Recurrence. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 3 (3):1-11.
    I argue that the Bruce Springsteen song “Born to Run” needs to be interpreted in light of---and thus gives evidence of a connection between---the philosophies of Friedrich Nietzsche and Martin Buber. Along the way I give an in-depth reading of the Nietzschean doctrines of Eternal Recurrence and Overman as they emerge from Also Sprach Zarathustra, as well as a brief overview of Buber’s I and Thou.
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  20.  9
    Anthony K. Jensen (2006). Nietzsche's Life Sentence: Coming to Terms with Eternal Recurrence (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):671-672.
    Anthony K. Jensen - Nietzsche's Life Sentence: Coming to Terms with Eternal Recurrence - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.4 671-672 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Anthony K. Jensen Emory University Lawrence J. Hatab. Nietzsche's Life Sentence: Coming to Terms with Eternal Recurrence. New York-London: Routledge, 2005. Pp. xix + 191. Paper, $24.95. In his latest book, Lawrence Hatab brings together several threads from his previous (...)
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  21.  11
    Alphonso Lingis (1978). Differance in the Eternal Recurrence of the Same. Research in Phenomenology 8 (1):77-91.
    The doctrine of eternal recurrence in Nietzsche is an essentially ecstatic doctrine. It is also strangely incommunicable. Here the ecstasy that reveals singularizes. The essential revelation closes the one to whom it is given in his own singularity ; only a singularity opens to the abysses and the Dionysian truth. Heidegger could then see in it an ontological doctrine. And an authentifying-singularizing-doctrine. Not, though, the same as his own. For Heidegger could suggest that the time horizon in which (...)
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  22.  3
    John Nolt (2008). Why Nietzsche Embraced Eternal Recurrence. History of European Ideas 34 (3):310-323.
    Nietzsche's embrace of the idea of eternal recurrence has long puzzled readers, both because the idea is inherently implausible and because it seems inconsistent with other aspects of his philosophy. This paper offers a novel account of Nietzsche's motives for that embrace—namely that Nietzsche found in eternal recurrence the only possible way to reconcile three potent and apparently conflicting convictions: there are no Hinterwelten , the great love all things just as they are , and all (...)
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  23. J. Harvey Lomax (ed.) (1997). Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Eternal Recurrence of the Same. University of California Press.
    This long overdue English translation of Karl Löwith's magisterial study is a major event in Nietzsche scholarship in the Anglo-American intellectual world. Its initial publication was extraordinary in itself—a dissident interpretation, written by a Jew, appearing in National Socialist Germany in 1935. Since then, Löwith's book has continued to gain recognition as one of the key texts in the German Nietzsche reception, as well as a remarkable effort to reclaim the philosopher's work from political misappropriation. For Löwith, the centerpiece of (...)
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  24. Ned Lukacher (1999). Time-Fetishes: The Secret History of Eternal Recurrence. Duke University Press Books.
    For over two and a half millennia human beings have attempted to invent strategies to “discover” the truth of time, to determine whether time is infinite, whether eternity is the infinite duration of a continuous present, or whether it too rises and falls with the cycles of universal creation and destruction. _Time-Fetishes_ recounts the history of a tradition that runs counter to the dominant tradition in Western metaphysics, which has sought to purify eternity of its temporal character. From the pre-Socratics (...)
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  25. Lars Bergström (2013). Death and Eternal Recurrence. In Feldman Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. Oxford U P
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  26. Karl Löwith (1997). Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Eternal Recurrence of the Same. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  27.  7
    Ned Lukacher (1998). Time-Fetishes: The Secret History of Eternal Recurrence. Duke University Press.
    As he makes transitions from literature to philosophy and psychoanalysis, Lukacher displays a theoretical imagination and historical vision that bring to the ...
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  28.  49
    Tom Stern (2011). Back to the Future: Eternal Recurrence and the Death of Socrates. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 41 (1):73.
  29. Alexander Nehamas (1980). The Eternal Recurrence. Philosophical Review 89 (3):331-356.
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  30. C. Van Fraassen Bas (1962). Capek on Eternal Recurrence. Journal of Philosophy 59 (14):371-375.
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  31. Hannes Leitgeb (2010). Sleeping Beauty and Eternal Recurrence. Analysis 70 (2):203-205.
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  32.  14
    Bernd Magnus (2012). Asceticism and Eternal Recurrence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (Supplement):93-111.
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  33.  23
    Alistair Moles (1989). Nietzsche's Eternal Recurrence as Riemannian Cosmology. International Studies in Philosophy 21 (2):21-35.
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  34.  9
    M. C. Sterling (1977). Recent Discussions of Eternal Recurrence: Some Critical Comments. Nietzsche-Studien 6 (1):261.
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  35.  43
    Bernd Magnus (1999). Asceticism and Eternal Recurrence: A Bridge Too Far. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (S1):93-111.
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  36.  24
    Milič Čapek (1983). Eternal Recurrence — Once More. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 19 (2):141 - 153.
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  37.  19
    Daniel W. Conway (2008). Decadence and Eternal Recurrence. The European Legacy 2 (4):653-657.
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  38.  8
    Robin Small (1983). Eternal Recurrence. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 13 (4):585 - 605.
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  39.  36
    Matthew R. Broome (2005). Suffering and Eternal Recurrence of the Same: The Neuroscience, Psychopathology, and Philosophy of Time. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):187-194.
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  40.  17
    Michael J. White (1980). Facets of Megarian Fatalism: Aristotelian Criticisms and the Stoic Doctrine of Eternal Recurrence. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):189 - 206.
  41. Giles Driscoll (1966). Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):461.
     
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  42.  22
    Robert Gooding-Williams (1999). Comments on Bernd Magnus's “A Bridge Too Far: Asceticism and Eternal Recurrence”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (S1):113-118.
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  43.  21
    Bernard Reginster (1998). Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Eternal Recurrence of the Same. Journal of Philosophy 95 (11):591-597.
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  44.  18
    Paul S. Loeb (1998). The Moment of Tragic Death in Nietzsche's Dionysian Doctrine of Eternal Recurrence. International Studies in Philosophy 30 (3):131-143.
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  45.  7
    Peter Bornedal (2006). Different Kinds of Ecstasy: Review of Three Recent Works on ‚Eternal Recurrence'. [REVIEW] Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):343-356.
  46.  17
    George J. Stack (1989). Riemann's Geometry and Eternal Recurrence as Cosmological Hypothesis. International Studies in Philosophy 21 (2):37-40.
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  47.  8
    Robin Small (2003). Nietzsche's Philosophy of the Eternal Recurrence of the Same. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):344-345.
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  48.  5
    Bernd Magnus (1979). Eternal Recurrence“. Nietzsche-Studien 8 (1):362.
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  49.  18
    Robert Wicks (1993). The Eternal Recurrence: Nietzsche's Ideology of the Lion. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):97-118.
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  50.  13
    Brian J. Fox (2002). Lukacher, Ned. Time-Fetishes: The Secret History of Eternal Recurrence. Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):869-870.
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