Search results for 'Ethical intuitionism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Klemens Kappel (2002). Challenges to Audi's Ethical Intuitionism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (4):391-413.score: 186.0
    Robert Audi's ethical intuitionism (Audi, 1997, 1998) deals effectively with standard epistemological problems facing the intuitionist. This is primarily because the notion of self-evidence employed by Audi commits to very little. Importantly, according to Audi we might understand a self-evident moral proposition and yet not believe it, and we might accept a self-evident proposition because it is self-evident, and yet fail to see that it is self-evident. I argue that these and similar features give rise to certain challenges (...)
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  2. Gebhard Geiger (1992). Why There Are No Objective Values: A Critique of Ethical Intuitionism From an Evolutionary Point of View. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):315-330.score: 180.0
    Using concepts of evolutionary game theory, this paper presents a critique of ethical intuitionism, or non-naturalism, in its cognitivist and objectivist interpretation. While epistemological considerations suggest that human rational learning through experience provides no basis for objective moral knowledge, it is argued below that modern evolutionary theory explains why this is so, i.e., why biological organisms do not evolve so as to experience objective preferences and obligations. The difference between the modes of the cognition of objective and of (...)
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  3. Michael Huemer (2005). Ethical Intuitionism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 180.0
    This book defends a form of ethical intuitionism, according to which (i) there are objective moral truths; (ii) we know some of these truths through a kind of immediate, intellectual awareness, or "intuition"; and (iii) our knowledge of moral truths gives us reasons for action independent of our desires. The author rebuts all the major objections to this theory and shows that the alternative theories about the nature of ethics all face grave difficulties.
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  4. Danny Frederick, Ethical Intuitionism: A Structural Critique.score: 180.0
    I present a structural critique of ethical intuitionism. Ethical intuitionists regard moral knowledge as deriving from moral intuition, moral observation, moral emotion and inference. However, moral intuitions, observations and emotions are cultural artefacts which often differ starkly between cultures. Intuitionists attribute uncongenial moral intuitions, observations or emotions to bias or to intellectual or moral failings; but that leads to sectarian mutual recrimination. Intuitionists try to avoid this by restricting epistemically genuine intuitions, observations or emotions to those which (...)
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  5. Clayton Littlejohn (2011). Ethical Intuitionism and Moral Skepticism. In Jill Graper Hernandez (ed.), The New Intuitionism.score: 162.0
    In this paper, I defend a non-skeptical intuitionist approach to moral epistemology from recent criticisms. Starting with Sinnott-Armstrong's skeptical attacks, I argue that a familiar sort of skeptical argument rests on a problematic conception of the evidential grounds of our moral judgments. The success of his argument turns on whether we conceive of the evidential grounds of our moral judgments as consisting entirely of non-normative considerations. While we cannot avoid skepticism if we accept this conception of our evidential grounds, that's (...)
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  6. Gebhard Geiger (1995). Why Are There No Objective Values? A Critique of Ethical Intuitionism From an Epistemological Point of View. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 26 (1):35 - 62.score: 148.0
    Using the mathematical frameworks of economic preference ranking, subjective probability, and rational learning through empirical evidence, the epistemological implications of teleological ethical intuitionism are pointed out to the extent to which the latter is based on cognitivist and objectivist concepts of value. The notions of objective value and objective norm are critically analysed with reference to epistemological criteria of intersubjectively shared valuative experience. It is concluded that one cannot meaningfully postulate general material theories of morality that could be (...)
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  7. Imtiaz Moosa (2007). Naturalistic Explanations of Apodictic Moral Claims: Brentano's Ethical Intuitionism and Nietzsche's Naturalism. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):159 - 182.score: 144.0
    In this article (1) I extract from Brentano’s works (three) formal arguments against “genealogical explanations” of ethical claims. Such explanation can also be designated as “naturalism” (not his appellation); (2) I counter these arguments, by showing how genealogical explanations of even apodictic moral claims are logically possible (albeit only if certain unlikely, stringent conditions are met); (3) I show how Nietzsche’s ethics meets these stringent conditions, but evolutionary ethics does not. My more general thesis is that naturalism and (...) in ethics need not be mutually incompatible. (shrink)
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  8. Pekka Väyrynen (2008). Some Good and Bad News for Ethical Intuitionism. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):489–511.score: 120.0
    The core doctrine of ethical intuitionism is that some of our ethical knowledge is non-inferential. Against this, Sturgeon has recently objected that if ethical intuitionists accept a certain plausible rationale for the autonomy of ethics, then their foundationalism commits them to an implausible epistemology outside ethics. I show that irrespective of whether ethical intuitionists take non-inferential ethical knowledge to be a priori or a posteriori, their commitment to the autonomy of ethics and foundationalism does (...)
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  9. Michael Huemer (2009). Précis of Ethical Intuitionism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):192-196.score: 120.0
    I summarize the main conclusions of my 2005 book, Ethical Intuitionism, for the book symposium in this issue.
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  10. Robert Cowan (2013). Clarifying Ethical Intuitionism. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 120.0
    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Ethical Intuitionism, whose core claim is that normal ethical agents can and do have non-inferentially justified first-order ethical beliefs. Although this is the standard formulation, there are two senses in which it is importantly incomplete. Firstly, ethical intuitionism claims that there are non-inferentially justified ethical beliefs, but there is a worrying lack of consensus in the ethical literature as to what non-inferentially (...)
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  11. Oliver A. Johnson (1957). Ethical Intuitionism--A Restatement. Philosophical Quarterly 7 (28):193-203.score: 120.0
    The paper is a combination of criticism and defense of ethical intuitionism, Meaning by this the view that we have insights about such matters that we can know to be true. Although the thesis is accepted that intuition is an authentic source of ethical knowledge, Many of the claims of intuitionists are subjected to critical scrutiny.
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  12. Michael Huemer (2007). Reply to Fred Seddon, "Recent Writings on Ethics" (Spring 2007): On Behalf of Ethical Intuitionism. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 9 (1):181 - 184.score: 120.0
    This is a response by the author of Ethical Intuitionism to criticisms raised by Fred Seddon (Jars, Spring 2007). Among other things, Huemer observes that his attack on ethical reductionism does not depend upon excluding relational properties from consideration at the start; that he does not claim that all philosophers are intuitionists; and that Objectivism is susceptible to the general arguments he discusses against the possibility of deriving an "ought" from an "is".
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  13. Nicholas L. Sturgeon (2002). Ethical Intuitionism and Ethical Naturalism. In Phillip Stratton-Lake (ed.), Ethical Intuitionism: Re-evaluations. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
  14. Stephen Darwall (2002). Ethical Intuitionism and the Motivation Problem,”. In Phillip Stratton-Lake (ed.), Ethical Intuitionism: Re-Evaluations. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
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  15. Phillip Stratton-Lake (ed.) (2002). Ethical Intuitionism: Re-Evaluations. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Ethical Intuitionism was the dominant moral theory in Britain for much of the eighteenth and nineteenth and the first third of the twentieth century. However, during the middle decades of the twentieth century ethical intuitionism came to be regarded as utterly untenable. It was thought to be either empty, or metaphysically and epistemologically extravagant, or both. This hostility led to a neglect of the central intuitionist texts, and encouraged the growth of a caricature of intuitionism (...)
     
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  16. Leo Abraham (1933). The Logic of Ethical Intuitionism. International Journal of Ethics 44 (1):37-55.score: 98.0
    Philosophers have in the past had difficulty in determining how to define ethical terms. here they are defined as open-context terms with a loosely limited range of substitution instances, in conformity with actual language usage. ethical terms are in themselves meaningless. it is a misuse to say, "x is wrong in itself." ethical terms then reduce to empirical terms concerning wants, likes, knowledge of cause and effect and consequences, knowledge of how ethical terms themselves work. (...) commands reduce to if-then statements. blame may possibly never make sense. (shrink)
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  17. Christoph Lumer (2010). Moral Desirability and Rational Decision. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (5):561-584.score: 96.0
    Being a formal and general as well as the most widely accepted approach to practical rationality, rational decision theory should be crucial for justifying rational morals. In particular, acting morally should also (nearly always) be rational in decision theoretic terms. After defending this thesis, in the critical part of the paper two strategies to develop morals following this insight are criticized: game theoretical ethics of cooperation and ethical intuitionism. The central structural objections to ethics of cooperation are that (...)
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  18. W. D. Hudson (1967). Ethical Intuitionism. New York, St. Martin's P..score: 94.0
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  19. Ayyagari Lakshmana Rao (1973). An Essay on Ethical Intuitionism. Andhra University Press and Publications.score: 94.0
     
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  20. Matthew S. Bedke (2008). Ethical Intuitions: What They Are, What They Are Not, and How They Justify. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):253-270.score: 92.0
    There are ways that ethical intuitions might be, and the various possibilities have epistemic ramifications. This paper criticizes some extant accounts of what ethical intuitions are and how they justify, and it offers an alternative account. Roughly, an ethical intuition that p is a kind of seeming state constituted by a consideration whether p, attended by positive phenomenological qualities that count as evidence for p, and so a reason to believe that p. They are distinguished from other (...)
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  21. Ellen-Marie Forsberg (2007). Value Pluralism and Coherentist Justification of Ethical Advice. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):81-97.score: 92.0
    Liberal societies are characterized by respect for a fundamental value pluralism; i.e., respect for individuals’ rights to live by their own conception of the good. Still, the state must make decisions that privilege some values at the cost of others. When public ethics committees give substantial ethical advice on policy related issues, it is therefore important that this advice is well justified. The use of explicit tools for ethical assessment can contribute to justifying advice. In this article, I (...)
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  22. M. B. E. Smith (1979). Ethical Intuitionism and Naturalism: A Reconciliation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):609 - 629.score: 92.0
    I argue that, If one adopts a minimal naturalism (of a kind rejected by moore, Hare, "et al".), One would adopt a methodology which yields conclusions identical to that yielded by intuitionistic methodology (of a kind employed by ross, Prichard, "et al".). I dilate upon the advantages which thus accrue to each theory, And I defend my minimal naturalism against a variety of objections.
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  23. Thomas Carson (2004). Philip Stratton‐Lake, Ed., Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations:Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations. Ethics 115 (1):175-177.score: 92.0
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  24. Ellen-Marie Forsberg (2007). Pluralism, the Ethical Matrix, and Coming to Conclusions. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (5):455-468.score: 92.0
    The ethical matrix approach was developed by Prof Ben Mepham and his colleagues at the University of Nottingham in the early 1990s. Since then the approach has received increasing attention and has been used by several researchers in different projects related to assessing ethical impacts of different food production technologies and other policy options of societal concern. The ethical matrix is sometimes understood simply as a checklist of ethical concerns, but might also be seen as a (...)
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  25. Govert den Hartogh, Andrew Altman, Christopher Heath Wellman, Andrew Jason Cohen, Sarah Conly & Thomas Christiano (2004). 10. Philip Stratton‐Lake, Ed., Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations Philip Stratton‐Lake, Ed., Ethical Intuitionism: Re‐Evaluations (Pp. 175-177). [REVIEW] Ethics 115 (1).score: 92.0
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  26. James Sias (forthcoming). Ethical Intuitionism and the Emotions: Toward an Empirically Adequate Moral Sense Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.score: 92.0
    IntroductionEthical intuitionists have never known quite what to make of the emotions. Generally speaking, these philosophers fall into two camps: rational intuitionists and moral sense theorists. And by my lights, neither camp has been able to tell a convincing story about the exact role and significance of emotion in moral judgment. Rational intuitionists are for the most part too dismissive of the emotions, either regarding emotions as little more than distractions to moral judgment,Samuel Clarke, for instance, after naming our “faculties (...)
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  27. P. F. Strawson (1949). Ethical Intuitionism. Philosophy 24 (88):23 - 33.score: 90.0
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  28. N. Lemos (2008). Review: Michael Huemer: Ethical Intuitionism. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (466):483-486.score: 90.0
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  29. David McNaughton (2006). Review of Michael Huemer, Ethical Intuitionism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).score: 90.0
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  30. Christine Swanton (1987). The Rationality of Ethical Intuitionism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 65 (2):172 – 181.score: 90.0
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  31. Michael W. Austin (2003). On the Alleged Irrationality of Ethical Intuitionism. Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (1):205-213.score: 90.0
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  32. Bernard H. Baumrin (1968). Aristotle's Ethical Intuitionism. New Scholasticism 42 (1):1-17.score: 90.0
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  33. R. N. Karani (1962). Vindication of Ethical Intuitionism. Mind 71 (284):535-538.score: 90.0
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  34. J. R. Lucas (1971). Ethical Intuitionism II. Philosophy 46 (175):1 - 11.score: 90.0
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  35. Lawrence J. Jost (1976). Is Aristotle an Ethical Intuitionist? Apeiron 10 (1):15 - 19.score: 90.0
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  36. Michael W. Austin (2004). It is Ethical Intuitionism, and Not Another Thing. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):155-157.score: 90.0
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  37. William G. O'Neill (2004). Ethical Intuitionism. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):434-436.score: 90.0
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  38. R. F. Atkinson, W. D. Hudson, G. J. Warnock, Mary Warnock & Pamela M. Huby (1968). New Studies in Ethics.Contemporary Moral Philosophy.Ethical Intuitionism.Existentialist Ethics.Greek Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (71):180.score: 90.0
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  39. C. L. H. (1967). Ethical Intuitionism. Review of Metaphysics 21 (2):371-372.score: 90.0
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  40. A. Phillips (1968). Ethical Intuitionism. Philosophical Books 9 (1):16-19.score: 90.0
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  41. David Kaspar (2012). Intuitionism. Continuum International Pub. Group.score: 84.0
    Thinking about morality -- Story of contemporary intuitionism -- Moral knowledge -- New challenges to intuitionism -- Grounds of morality -- Right and the good reconsidered -- Intuitionism's rivals -- Being moral: how and why.
     
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  42. Allan Gibbard (2008). Reconciling Our Aims: In Search of Bases for Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    In these three Tanner lectures, distinguished ethical theorist Allan Gibbard explores the nature of normative thought and the bases of ethics. In the first lecture he explores the role of intuitions in moral thinking and offers a way of thinking about the intuitive method of moral inquiry that both places this activity within the natural world and makes sense of it as an indispensable part of our lives as planners. In the second and third lectures he takes up the (...)
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  43. Elizabeth Tropman (2010). Intuitionism and the Secondary-Quality Analogy in Ethics. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):31-45.score: 72.0
    Sensibility theorists such as John McDowell have argued that once we appreciate certain similarities between moral values and secondary qualities, a new meta-ethical position might emerge, one that avoids the alleged difficulties with moral intuitionism and non-cognitivism. The aim of this paper is to examine the meta-ethical prospects of this secondary-quality analogy. Of particular concern will be the extent to which McDowell’s comparison of values to secondary qualities supports a viewpoint unique from that of the moral intuitionist. (...)
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  44. Philip Stratton-Lake (1999). Why Externalism is Not a Problem for Ethical Intuitionists. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (1):77–90.score: 72.0
    Ethical intuitionists are often criticised on the ground that their view makes it possible for an agent to believe that she ought to ? whilst lacking any motive to ?-that is, on the ground that it involves, or implies a form of externalism. I begin by distinguishing this form of externalism (what I call 'belief externalism') from two other forms of ethical externalism-moral externalism, and reasons externalism. I then consider various reasons why one might think that ethical (...)
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  45. Hillel D. Braude (2012). Intuition in Medicine: A Philosophical Defense of Clinical Reasoning. The University of Chicago Press.score: 72.0
    Intuition in medical and moral reasoning -- Moral intuitionism -- The place of Aristotelian phronesis in clinical reasoning -- Aristotle's practical syllogism: accounting for the individual through a theory of action and cognition -- Individual and statistical physiognomy: the art and science of making the invisible visible -- Clinical intuition versus statistical reasoning -- Contingency and correlation: the significance of modeling clinical reasoning on statistics -- Abduction: the intuitive support of clinical induction -- Conclusion: medical ethics beyond ontology.
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  46. Henry Calderwood (1896). The Relation of Intuitionism to the Ethical Doctrine of Self-Realization. Philosophical Review 5 (4):337-351.score: 72.0
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  47. W. M. Kyle (1927). British Ethical Theories: The Intuitionist Reaction Against Hobbes. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):113 – 123.score: 72.0
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  48. James T. King (1969). Aristotle's Ethical Non-Intuitionism. New Scholasticism 43 (1):131-142.score: 72.0
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  49. Adenekan Dedeke (2013). A Cognitive–Intuitionist Model of Moral Judgment. Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.score: 68.0
    The study of moral decision-making presents to us two approaches for understanding such choices. The cognitive and the neurocognitive approaches postulate that reason and reasoning determines moral judgments. On the other hand, the intuitionist approaches postulate that automated intuitions mostly dominate moral judgments. There is a growing concern that neither of these approaches by itself captures all the key aspects of moral judgments. This paper draws on models from neurocognitive research and social-intuitionist research areas to propose an integrative cognitive–intuitive model (...)
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  50. Jill Hernandez (ed.) (forthcoming). The New Intuitionism. Continuum.score: 66.0
    Since the 2004 publication of his book The Good in the Right, Robert Audi has been at the forefront of the current resurgence of interest in intuitionism – the idea that human beings have an intuitive sense of right and wrong – in ethics. The New Intuitionism brings together some of the world’s most important contemporary writers from such diverse fields as metaethics, epistemology and moral psychology to explore the latest implications of, and challenges to, Audi’s work. The (...)
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