Search results for 'Ethics Forecasting' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lauren N. Harkrider, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Zhanna Bagdasarov, James F. Johnson, Michael D. Mumford, Shane Connelly & Lynn D. Devenport (2014). Retracted Article: Improving Case-Based Ethics Training: How Modeling Behaviors and Forecasting Influence Effectiveness. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):299-299.score: 150.0
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  2. Lauren N. Harkrider, Chase E. Thiel, Zhanna Bagdasarov, Michael D. Mumford, James F. Johnson, Shane Connelly & Lynn D. Devenport (2012). Improving Case-Based Ethics Training with Codes of Conduct and Forecasting Content. Ethics and Behavior 22 (4):258 - 280.score: 150.0
    Although case-based training is popular for ethics education, little is known about how specific case content influences training effectiveness. Therefore, the effects of (a) codes of ethical conduct and (b) forecasting content were investigated. Results revealed richer cases, including both codes and forecasting content, led to increased knowledge acquisition, greater sensemaking strategy use, and better decision ethicality. With richer cases, a specific pattern emerged. Specifically, content describing codes alone was more effective when combined with short-term forecasts, whereas (...)
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  3. Martin Wachs (1990). Ethics and Advocacy in Forecasting for Public Policy. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 9 (1/2):141-157.score: 126.0
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  4. Rosamond Rhodes & James J. Strain (2007). Affective Forecasting and Its Implications for Medical Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (01):54-65.score: 126.0
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  5. Alexandra E. MacDougall, Lauren N. Harkrider, Zhanna Bagdasarov, James F. Johnson, Chase E. Thiel, Juandre Peacock, Michael D. Mumford, Lynn D. Devenport & Shane Connelly (2014). Examining the Effects of Incremental Case Presentation and Forecasting Outcomes on Case-Based Ethics Instruction. Ethics and Behavior 24 (2):126-150.score: 126.0
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  6. Philip Brey (2012). Anticipatory Ethics for Emerging Technologies. NanoEthics 6 (1):1-13.score: 102.0
    Abstract In this essay, a new approach for the ethical study of emerging technology ethics will be presented, called anticipatory technology ethics (ATE). The ethics of emerging technology is the study of ethical issues at the R&D and introduction stage of technology development through anticipation of possible future devices, applications, and social consequences. I will argue that a major problem for its development is the problem of uncertainty, which can only be overcome through methodologically sound forecasting (...)
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  7. Raphael Cohen-Almagor (ed.) (2000). Medical Ethics at the Dawn of the 21st Century. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 90.0
     
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  8. D. S. Horner (2005). Anticipating Ethical Challenges: Is There a Coming Era of Nanotechnology? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):127-138.score: 88.0
    In this paper I question the claims made for a ‘coming era of nanotechnology’ and the ethical challenges, it is argued, that are entailed by this particular technological revolution. I argue that such futurist claims are sustained by an untenable modernist narrative which separates the technical and the social. This is exemplified by the work of K. Eric Drexler and his claim that whilst the course of scientific knowledge may remain unpredictable we nevertheless can predict with accuracy the trajectory of (...)
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  9. Cheryl K. Stenmark, Alison L. Antes, Xiaoqian Wang, Jared J. Caughron, Chase E. Thiel & Michael D. Mumford (2010). Strategies in Forecasting Outcomes in Ethical Decision-Making: Identifying and Analyzing the Causes of the Problem. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):110 – 127.score: 78.0
    This study examined the role of key causal analysis strategies in forecasting and ethical decision-making. Undergraduate participants took on the role of the key actor in several ethical problems and were asked to identify and analyze the causes, forecast potential outcomes, and make a decision about each problem. Time pressure and analytic mindset were manipulated while participants worked through these problems. The results indicated that forecast quality was associated with decision ethicality, and the identification of the critical causes of (...)
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  10. Michael D. Mumford, Chase E. Thiel, Jared J. Caughron, Xiaoqian Wang, Alison L. Antes & Cheryl K. Stenmark (2010). Strategies in Forecasting Outcomes in Ethical Decision-Making: Identifying and Analyzing the Causes of the Problem. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):110-127.score: 78.0
    This study examined the role of key causal analysis strategies in forecasting and ethical decision-making. Undergraduate participants took on the role of the key actor in several ethical problems and were asked to identify and analyze the causes, forecast potential outcomes, and make a decision about each problem. Time pressure and analytic mindset were manipulated while participants worked through these problems. The results indicated that forecast quality was associated with decision ethicality, and the identification of the critical causes of (...)
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  11. Cheryl Stenmark (2013). Forecasting and Ethical Decision Making: What Matters? Ethics and Behavior 23 (6):445-462.score: 78.0
    This study examined how the number and types of consequences considered are related to forecasting and ethical decision making. Undergraduate participants took on the role of the key actor in several ethical problems and were asked to forecast potential outcomes and make a decision about each problem. Performance pressure was manipulated by ostensibly making rewards contingent on good problem-solving performance. The results indicated that forecast quality was associated with decision ethicality, and the identification of the critical consequences of the (...)
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  12. Meagan E. Brock, Andrew Vert, Vykinta Kligyte, Ethan P. Waples, Sydney T. Sevier & Michael D. Mumford (2008). Mental Models: An Alternative Evaluation of a Sensemaking Approach to Ethics Instruction. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):449-472.score: 72.0
    In spite of the wide variety of approaches to ethics training it is still debatable which approach has the highest potential to enhance professionals’ integrity. The current effort assesses a novel curriculum that focuses on metacognitive reasoning strategies researchers use when making sense of day-to-day professional practices that have ethical implications. The evaluated trainings effectiveness was assessed by examining five key sensemaking processes, such as framing, emotion regulation, forecasting, self-reflection, and information integration that experts and novices apply in (...)
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  13. Philip A. E. Brey (2012). Anticipating Ethical Issues in Emerging IT. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (4):305-317.score: 70.0
    In this essay, a new approach to the ethics of emerging information technology will be presented, called anticipatory technology ethics (ATE). The ethics of emerging technology is the study of ethical issues at the R&D and introduction stage of technology development through anticipation of possible future devices, applications, and social consequences. In the essay, I will first locate emerging technology in the technology development cycle, after which I will consider ethical approaches to emerging technologies, as well as (...)
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  14. Dana Cook Grossman & Heinz Valtin (eds.) (1999). Great Issues for Medicine in the Twenty-First Century: Ethical and Social Issues Arising Out of Advances in the Biomedical Sciences. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 70.0
     
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  15. Robert Audi (2008). Some Dimensions of Trust in Business Practices: From Financial and Product Representation to Licensure and Voting. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):97 - 102.score: 64.0
    This paper is an examination of the role of trust in the previous seven papers in this issue of the Journal. Trust and trustworthiness are briefly characterized; their importance in business itself and in business ethics is briefly described; and each paper is discussed in relation to how trust figures in the ethical issues it raises. The overall discussion brings out the need for further work on the nature of trust and on the elements in business, such as transparency, (...)
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  16. E. Brock Meagan, Vykinta Kligyte Andrew Vert, P. Waples Ethan, T. Sevier Sydney & D. Mumford Michael (2008). Mental Models: An Alternative Evaluation of a Sensemaking Approach to Ethics Instruction. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3).score: 60.0
    In spite of the wide variety of approaches to ethics training it is still debatable which approach has the highest potential to enhance professionals’ integrity. The current effort assesses a novel curriculum that focuses on metacognitive reasoning strategies researchers use when making sense of day-to-day professional practices that have ethical implications. The evaluated trainings effectiveness was assessed by examining five key sensemaking processes, such as framing, emotion regulation, forecasting, self-reflection, and information integration that experts and novices apply in (...)
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  17. Spencer Phillips Hey (2014). Ethics and Epistemology of Accurate Prediction in Clinical Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 10:1-4.score: 60.0
    All major research ethics policies assert that the ethical review of clinical trial protocols should include a systematic assessment of risks and benefits. But despite this policy, protocols do not typically contain explicit probability statements about the likely risks or benefits involved in the proposed research. In this essay, I articulate a range of ethical and epistemic advantages that explicit forecasting would offer to the health research enterprise. I then consider how some particular confidence levels may come into (...)
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  18. David E. Klemm (2008). Religion and the Human Future: An Essay on Theological Humanism. Blackwell Pub..score: 60.0
    The shape of theological humanism -- Ideas and challenges -- The humanist imagination -- Thinking of God -- The logic of Christian humanism -- On the integrity of life -- The task of theological humanism -- Our endangered garden -- A school of conscience -- Masks of mind -- Religion and spiritual integrity -- Living theological humanism.
     
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  19. Ruwen Ogien (2006). La Morale a-T-Elle Un Avenir? Pleins Feux.score: 60.0
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  20. Jinhan Pae & Tae Hee Choi (2011). Corporate Governance, Commitment to Business Ethics, and Firm Valuation: Evidence From the Korean Stock Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (2):323 - 348.score: 48.0
    A variety of stakeholders have long been interested in the factors that are related to firm valuation. This article investigates why companies with more comprehensive corporate governance (CG) have a value premium over companies with less comprehensive CG. We posit and find that the cost of equity capital (COC) decreases with the strength of CG, suggesting that the value premium stems from the lower COC for more comprehensive CG. We also find that the COC is lower for companies with strong (...)
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  21. L. J. Brooks (1989). Corporate Ethical Performance: Trends, Forecasts and Outlooks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (1):31 - 38.score: 44.0
    Executives, professionals, educators and labour leaders are requesting an update on corporate ethical trends. This article presents an examination of why the interest in corporate ethics is growing both in society and in corporations. An analysis follows of how corporations are responding to this interest, and of how that response might be enhanced through improved second-generation codes of ethical performance.
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  22. Chase E. Thiel, Zhanna Bagdasarov, Lauren Harkrider, James F. Johnson & Michael D. Mumford (2012). Leader Ethical Decision-Making in Organizations: Strategies for Sensemaking. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (1):49-64.score: 44.0
    Organizational leaders face environmental challenges and pressures that put them under ethical risk. Navigating this ethical risk is demanding given the dynamics of contemporary organizations. Traditional models of ethical decision-making (EDM) are an inadequate framework for understanding how leaders respond to ethical dilemmas under conditions of uncertainty and equivocality. Sensemaking models more accurately illustrate leader EDM and account for individual, social, and environmental constraints. Using the sensemaking approach as a foundation, previous EDM models are revised and extended to comprise a (...)
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  23. D. S. Horner (2007). Digital Futures: Promising Ethics and the Ethics of Promising. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 37 (2):64-77.score: 42.0
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  24. Jeffrey S. Miller (2009). Opportunistic Disclosures of Earnings Forecasts and Non-GAAP Earnings Measures. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):3 - 10.score: 36.0
    The Securities and Exchange Commission requires publicly held US corporations to disclose all information, whether it is positive or negative, that might be relevant to an investor's decision to buy, sell, or hold a company's securities. The decisions made by corporate managers to disclose such information can significantly affect the judgments and decisions of investors. This paper examines academic accounting research on corporate managers' voluntary disclosures of earnings forecasts and non-GAAP earnings measures. Much of the evidence from this research indicates (...)
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  25. Nada Gligorov (2009). Reconsidering the Impact of Affective Forecasting. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (02):166-.score: 36.0
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  26. Rosamond Rhodes & James J. Strain (2009). Further Thoughts About Affective Forecasting Biases in Medicine: A Response to Nada Gligorov. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (02):174-.score: 36.0
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  27. J. Strain (2009). Reconsidering the Impact of Affective Forecasting. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18:166-173.score: 36.0
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  28. Christopher Cosans (2009). Does Milton Friedman Support a Vigorous Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):391 - 399.score: 27.0
    This paper explores the level of obligation called for by Milton Friedman’s classic essay “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profits.” Several scholars have argued that Friedman asserts that businesses have no or minimal social duties beyond compliance with the law. This paper argues that this reading of Friedman does not give adequate weight to some claims that he makes and to their logical extensions. Throughout his article, Friedman emphasizes the values of freedom, respect for law, and duty. (...)
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  29. Peter Singer (2005). Ethics and Intuitions. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):331 - 352.score: 27.0
    For millennia, philosophers have speculated about the origins of ethics. Recent research in evolutionary psychology and the neurosciences has shed light on that question. But this research also has normative significance. A standard way of arguing against a normative ethical theory is to show that in some circumstances the theory leads to judgments that are contrary to our common moral intuitions. If, however, these moral intuitions are the biological residue of our evolutionary history, it is not clear why we (...)
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  30. Martha C. Nussbaum (1999). Virtue Ethics: A Misleading Category? [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 3 (3):163-201.score: 27.0
    Virtue ethics is standardly taught and discussed as a distinctive approach to the major questions of ethics, a third major position alongside Utilitarian and Kantian ethics. I argue that this taxonomy is a confusion. Both Utilitarianism and Kantianism contain treatments of virtue, so virtue ethics cannot possibly be a separate approach contrasted with those approaches. There are, to be sure, quite a few contemporary philosophical writers about virtue who are neither Utilitarians nor Kantians; many of these (...)
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  31. James H. Moor (2001). The Future of Computer Ethics: You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet! [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):89-91.score: 27.0
    The computer revolution can beusefully divided into three stages, two ofwhich have already occurred: the introductionstage and the permeation stage. We have onlyrecently entered the third and most importantstage – the power stage – in which many ofthe most serious social, political, legal, andethical questions involving informationtechnology will present themselves on a largescale. The present article discusses severalreasons to believe that future developments ininformation technology will make computerethics more vibrant and more important thanever. Computer ethics is here to stay!
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  32. Gillian Rice (1999). Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):345 - 358.score: 27.0
    As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and (2) to provide some knowledge of Islamic philosophy in order to help managers do business in Muslim cultures. The (...)
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  33. José Luis Bermúdez (2007). Thinking Without Words: An Overview for Animal Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (3):319 - 335.score: 27.0
    In Thinking without Words I develop a philosophical framework for treating some animals and human infants as genuine thinkers. This paper outlines the aspects of this account that are most relevant to those working in animal ethics. There is a range of different levels of cognitive sophistication in different animal species, in addition to limits to the types of thought available to non-linguistic creatures, and it may be important for animal ethicists to take this into account in exploring issues (...)
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  34. Mark S. Schwartz (2005). Universal Moral Values for Corporate Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):27 - 44.score: 27.0
    How can one establish if a corporate code of ethics is ethical in terms of its content? One important first step might be the establishment of core universal moral values by which corporate codes of ethics can be ethically constructed and evaluated. Following a review of normative research on corporate codes of ethics, a set of universal moral values is generated by considering three sources: (1) corporate codes of ethics; (2) global codes of ethics; and (...)
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  35. Dag G. Aasland (2004). On the Ethics Behind “Business Ethics”. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):3-8.score: 27.0
    Ethics in business and economics is often attacked for being too superficial. By elaborating the conclusions of two such critics of business ethics and welfare economics respectively, this article will draw the attention to the ethics behind these apparently well-intended, but not always convincing constructions, by help of the fundamental ethics of Emmanuel Levinas. To Levinas, responsibility is more basic than language, and thus also more basic than all social constructions. Co-operation relations in organizations, markets and (...)
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  36. Patrick Feng (2000). Rethinking Technology, Revitalizing Ethics: Overcoming Barriers to Ethical Design. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (2):207-220.score: 27.0
    This paper explores the role of ethics in design. Traditionally, ethical questions have been seen as marginal issues in the design of technology. Part of the reason for this stems from the widely held notion of technology being “out of control.” This notion is a barrier to what I call “ethical design” because it implies that ethics has no role to play in the development of technology. This view, however, is challenged by recent work in the field of (...)
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  37. Michelle R. Greenwood (2002). Ethics and HRM: A Review and Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):261 - 278.score: 27.0
    This paper reviews and develops the ethical analysis of human resource management (HRM). Initially, the ethical perspective of HRM is differentiated from the "mainstrea" and critical perspectives of HRM. To date, the ethical analysis of HRM has taken one of two forms: the application Kantian and utilitarian ethical theories to the gestalt of HRM, and the application of theories of justice and fairness to specific HRM practices. This paper is concerned with the former, the ethical analysis of HRM in its (...)
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  38. Mark S. Schwartz (2004). Effective Corporate Codes of Ethics: Perceptions of Code Users. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):323 - 343.score: 27.0
    The study examines employee, managerial, and ethics officer perceptions regarding their companies codes of ethics. The study moves beyond examining the mere existence of a code of ethics to consider the role that code content and code process (i.e. creation, implementation, and administration) might play with respect to the effectiveness of codes in influencing behavior. Fifty-seven in-depth, semi-structured interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The factors viewed by respondents (...)
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  39. Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2008). Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657 - 666.score: 27.0
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate social responsibility also fully mediated the (...)
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  40. Michael Davis (1995). An Historical Preface to Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):33-48.score: 27.0
    This article attempts to distinguish between science and technology, on the one hand, and engineering, on the other, offering a brief introduction to engineering values and engineering ethics. The method is (roughly) a philosophical examination of history. Engineering turns out to be a relatively recent enterprise, barely three hundred years old, to have distinctive commitments both technical and moral, and to have changed a good deal both technically and morally during that period. What motivates the paper is the belief (...)
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  41. William J. McKinney (1996). Prediction and Rolston's Environmental Ethics: Lessons From the Philosophy of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):429-440.score: 27.0
    Rolston (1988) argues that in order to act ethically in the environment, moral agents must assume that their actions are potentially harmful, and then strive to prove otherwise before implementing that action. In order to determine whether or not an action in the environment is harmful requires the tools of applied epistemology in order to act in accord with Rolston’s ethical prescription. This link between ethics and epistemology demands a closer look at the relationship between confirmation theory, particularly notions (...)
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  42. Mike W. Martin (2002). Personal Meaning and Ethics in Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):545-560.score: 27.0
    The study of engineering ethics tends to emphasize professional codes of ethics and, to lesser degrees, business ethics and technology studies. These are all important vantage points, but they neglect personal moral commitments, as well as personal aesthetic, religious, and other values that are not mandatory for all members of engineering. This paper illustrates how personal moral commitments motivate, guide, and give meaning to the work of engineers, contributing to both self-fulfillment and public goods. It also explores (...)
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  43. Göran Svensson & Greg Wood (2008). A Model of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):303 - 322.score: 27.0
    It appears that in the 30 years that business ethics has been a discipline in its own right a model of business ethics has not been proffered. No one appears to have tried to explain the phenomenon known as ‚business ethics’ and the ways that we as a society interact with the concept, therefore, the authors have addressed this gap in the literature by proposing a model of business ethics that the authors hope will stimulate debate. (...)
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  44. Addeane S. Caelleigh (2003). Roles for Scientific Societies in Promoting Integrity in Publication Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):221-241.score: 27.0
    Scientific societies can have a powerful influence on the professional lives of scientists. Using this influence, they have a responsibility to make long-term commitments and investments in promoting integrity in publication, just as in other areas of research ethics. Concepts that can inform the thinking and activities of scientific societies with regard to publication ethics are: the “hidden curriculum” (the message of actions rather than formal statements), a fresh look at the components of acting with integrity, deviancy as (...)
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  45. John Lincourt & Robert Johnson (2004). Ethics Training: A Genuine Dilemma for Engineering Educators. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):353-358.score: 27.0
    This is an examination of three main strategies used by engineering educators to integrate ethics into the engineering curriculum. They are: (1) the standalone course, (2) the ethics imperative mandating ethics content for all engineering courses, and (3) outsourcing ethics instruction to an external expert. The expectations from each approach are discussed and their main limitations described. These limitations include the insular status of the stand-alone course, the diffuse and uneven integration with the ethics imperative, (...)
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  46. Alexander Bertland (2009). Virtue Ethics in Business and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):25 - 32.score: 27.0
    Recently, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have developed the capabilities approach to provide a model for understanding the effectiveness of programs to help the developing nations. The approach holds that human beings are fundamentally free and have a sense of human dignity. Therefore, institutions need to help people enhance this dignity by providing them with the opportunity to develop their capabilities freely. I argue that this approach may help support business ethics based on virtue. Since teleology has become problematic, (...)
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  47. M. Schwartz (2001). The Nature of the Relationship Between Corporate Codes of Ethics and Behaviour. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):247 - 262.score: 27.0
    A study was conducted in order to examine the relationship between corporate codes of ethics and behaviour. Fifty-seven interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The study found that codes of ethics are a potential factor influencing the behaviour of corporate agents. Reasons are provided why codes are violated as well as complied with. A set of eight metaphors are developed which help to explain how codes of ethics influence (...)
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  48. Sami Alsmadi (2008). Marketing Research Ethics: Researcher's Obligations Toward Human Subjects. Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):153-160.score: 27.0
    This paper addresses the growing concern over violation of research ethics in marketing, in particular rights of human subjects in fieldwork, notably the right to informed consent; right to privacy and confidentiality; and right not to be deceived or harmed as a result of participation in a research. The paper highlights the interaction of the three main parties involved in most marketing research: the sponsoring organization (client or user), researcher, and participant in the survey, focusing on researcher’s ethical responsibilities (...)
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  49. Dan McArthur (2009). Good Ethics Can Sometimes Mean Better Science: Research Ethics and the Milgram Experiments. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):69-79.score: 27.0
    All agree that if the Milgram experiments were proposed today they would never receive approval from a research ethics board. However, the results of the Milgram experiments are widely cited across a broad range of academic literature from psychology to moral philosophy. While interpretations of the experiments vary, few commentators, especially philosophers, have expressed doubts about the basic soundness of the results. What I argue in this paper is that this general approach to the experiments might be in error. (...)
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  50. Christian Miller (2003). Social Psychology and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Ethics 7 (4):365-392.score: 27.0
    Several philosophers have recently claimed to have discovered a new and rather significant problem with virtue ethics. According to them, virtue ethics generates certain expectations about the behavior of human beings which are subject to empirical testing. But when the relevant experimental work is done in social psychology, the results fall remarkably short of meeting those expectations. So, these philosophers think, despite its recent success, virtue ethics has far less to offer to contemporary ethical theory than might (...)
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