Search results for 'Ethics of Science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Guido Van Steendam, András Dinnyés, Jacques Mallet, Rolando Meloni, Carlos Romeo Casabona, Jorge Guerra González, Josef Kuře, Eörs Szathmáry, Jan Vorstenbosch, Péter Molnár, David Edbrooke, Judit Sándor, Ferenc Oberfrank, Ron Cole-Turner, István Hargittai, Beate Littig, Miltos Ladikas, Emilio Mordini, Hans E. Roosendaal, Maurizio Salvi, Balázs Gulyás & Diana Malpede (2006). Summary: The Budapest Meeting 2005 Intensified Networking on Ethics of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):415-420.score: 576.0
    This paper reports on the meeting of the Sounding Board of the EU Reprogenetics Project that was held in Budapest, Hungary, 6–9 November 2005. The Reprogenetics Project runs from 2004 until 2007 and has a brief to study the ethical aspects of human reproductive cloning and germline gene therapy. Discussions during The Budapest Meeting are reported in depth in this paper as well as the initiatives to involve the participating groups and others in ongoing collaborations with the goal of forming (...)
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  2. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 492.0
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given that research in (...)
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  3. Laura Westra (1997). Post-Normal Science, the Precautionary Principle and the Ethics of Integrity. Foundations of Science 2 (2):237-262.score: 462.0
    Present laws and regulations even in democratic countries are not sufficient to prevent the grave environmental threats we face. Further, even environmental ethics, when they remain anthropocentric cannot propose a better approach. I argue that, taking in considerations the precautionary principle, and adopting the perspective of post-normal science, the ethics of integrity suggest a better way to reduce ecological threats and promote the human good globally.
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  4. Berna Arda (2012). Publication Ethics From the Perspective of PhD Students of Health Sciences: A Limited Experience. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):213-222.score: 456.0
    Publication ethics, an important subtopic of science ethics, deals with determination of the misconducts of science in performing research or in the dissemination of ideas, data and products. Science, the main features of which are secure, reliable and ethically obtained data, plays a major role in shaping the society. As long as science maintains its quality by being based on reliable and ethically obtained data, it will be possible to maintain its role in shaping (...)
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  5. M. A. B. Degenhardt (1986). The 'Ethics of Belief and Education in Science and Morals. Journal of Moral Education 15 (2):109-118.score: 441.0
    Educational worries about indoctrination are linked to matters of rationality and of the ethics of belief. These are both threatened by too 'open' approaches to moral education and by too 'closed' approaches to science education. The moral importance of what is involved points to the need to inform the teaching of all disciplines by reflection on their rational foundations.
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  6. Kathleen Eggleson (forthcoming). Transatlantic Divergences in Citizen Science Ethics—Comparative Analysis of the DIYbio Code of Ethics Drafts of 2011. Nanoethics:1-6.score: 441.0
    Codes of ethics were drafted by participants in the European and North American Congresses of DIYbio, a single global organization of informal biotechnology practitioners, in 2011. In general, the existence of a code of ethics amongst a community is itself significant. Codes of professional ethics are common in scientific and engineering fields, as well as in DIY communities. It is also significant, and highly unusual, that DIYbio has maintained two separate codes of ethics years after their (...)
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  7. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch I: Theory of Science and Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):207-219.score: 420.0
    Richard Koch first made his appearance in the 1920s with works published on the foundations of medicine. These publications describe the character of medicine as an action and the status of medicine within the theory of science. One of his conclusions is that medicine is not a science in the original sense of the word, but a practical discipline. It serves a practical purpose: to heal the sick. All medical knowledge is oriented towards this purpose, which also defines (...)
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  8. Martin Tolich (2008). Guidelines for Community-Based Ethics Review of Children's Science Fair Projects. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):303-310.score: 405.0
    Low-level community based ethics committees staffed by teachers, parents and community representatives can readily review children’s science fair projects subject to the revision of two core assumptions currently governing children’s Science Fairs. The first part of the paper recasts the New Zealand Royal Society guidelines from its primary emphasis on risk to a new assumption, without benefit there can be no risk. Equally, this revision gives more prominence to the participant information sheet, allowing it to act as (...)
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  9. Tsjalling Swierstra & Arie Rip (2007). Nano-Ethics as NEST-Ethics: Patterns of Moral Argumentation About New and Emerging Science and Technology. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (1):3-20.score: 402.0
    There might not be a specific nano-ethics, but there definitely is an ethics of new & emerging science and technology (NEST), with characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation. Ethical discussion in and around nanoscience and technology reflects such NEST-ethics. We offer an inventory of the arguments, and show patterns in their evolution, in arenas full of proponents and opponents. We also show that there are some nano-specific issues: in how size matters, and when agency is (...)
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  10. William J. McKinney (1996). Prediction and Rolston's Environmental Ethics: Lessons From the Philosophy of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):429-440.score: 402.0
    Rolston (1988) argues that in order to act ethically in the environment, moral agents must assume that their actions are potentially harmful, and then strive to prove otherwise before implementing that action. In order to determine whether or not an action in the environment is harmful requires the tools of applied epistemology in order to act in accord with Rolston’s ethical prescription. This link between ethics and epistemology demands a closer look at the relationship between confirmation theory, particularly notions (...)
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  11. Abraham Edel (1961). Science and the Structure of Ethics. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.score: 402.0
    Science and the Structure of Ethics Abraham Edel I. The Nature and Complexity of the Problem. Issues in the "Relation of Science and Ethics" Traditional ...
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  12. Hyemin Han (forthcoming). Virtue Ethics, Positive Psychology, and a New Model of Science and Engineering Ethics Education. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-20.score: 402.0
    This essay develops a new conceptual framework of science and engineering ethics education based on virtue ethics and positive psychology. Virtue ethicists and positive psychologists have argued that current rule-based moral philosophy, psychology, and education cannot effectively promote students’ moral motivation for actual moral behavior and may even lead to negative outcomes, such as moral schizophrenia. They have suggested that their own theoretical framework of virtue ethics and positive psychology can contribute to the effective promotion of (...)
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  13. Dieter Birnbacher (1999). Ethics and Social Science: Which Kind of Co-Operation? [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):319-336.score: 399.0
    The relation between ethics and social science is often conceived as complementary, both disciplines cooperating in the solution of concrete moral problems. Against this, the paper argues that not only applied ethics but even certain parts of general ethics have to incorporate sociological and psychological data and theories from the start. Applied ethics depends on social science in order to asses the impact of its own principles on the concrete realities which these principles are (...)
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  14. Bernice Bovenkerk & Franck L. B. Meijboom (2013). Fish Welfare in Aquaculture: Explicating the Chain of Interactions Between Science and Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):41-61.score: 399.0
    Aquaculture is the fastest growing animal-production sector in the world. This leads to the question how we should guarantee fish welfare. Implementing welfare standards presupposes that we know how to weigh, define, and measure welfare. While at first glance these seem empirical questions, they cannot be answered without ethical reflection. Normative assumptions are made when weighing, defining, and measuring welfare. Moreover, the focus on welfare presupposes that welfare is a morally important concept. This in turn presupposes that we can define (...)
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  15. Alexander M. Petersen, Ioannis Pavlidis & Ioanna Semendeferi (forthcoming). A Quantitative Perspective on Ethics in Large Team Science. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-23.score: 399.0
    The gradual crowding out of singleton and small team science by large team endeavors is challenging key features of research culture. It is therefore important for the future of scientific practice to reflect upon the individual scientist’s ethical responsibilities within teams. To facilitate this reflection we show labor force trends in the US revealing a skewed growth in academic ranks and increased levels of competition for promotion within the system; we analyze teaming trends across disciplines and national borders demonstrating (...)
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  16. Klaus Hoeyer (2006). Ethics Wars”: Reflections on the Antagonism Between Bioethicists and Social Science Observers of Biomedicine. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):203 - 227.score: 396.0
    Social scientists often lament the fact that philosophically trained ethicists pay limited attention to the insights they generate. This paper presents an overview of tendencies in sociological and anthropological studies of morality, ethics and bioethics, and suggests that a lack in philosophical interest might be related to a tendency among social scientists to employ either a deficit model (social science perspectives accommodate the sense of context that philosophical ethics lacks), a replacement model (social scientists have finally found (...)
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  17. David B. Resnik (1998). The Ethics of Science: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 396.0
    During the past decade scientists, public policy analysts, politicians, and laypeople, have become increasingly aware of the importance of ethical conduct in scientific research. In this timely book, David B. Resnik introduces the reader to the ethical dilemmas and questions that arise in scientific research. Some of the issues addressed in the book include ethical decision-making, the goals and methods of science, and misconduct in science. The Ethics of Science also discusses significant case studies such as (...)
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  18. Guy Axtell (forthcoming). Possibility and Permission? Intellectual Character, Inquiry, and the Ethics of Belief. In Pihlstrom S. & Rydenfelt H. (eds.), William James on Religion. (Palgrave McMillan “Philosophers in Depth” Series.score: 387.0
    This chapter examines the modifications William James made to his account of the ethics of belief from his early ‘subjective method’ to his later heightened concerns with personal doxastic responsibility and with an empirically-driven comparative research program he termed a ‘science of religions’. There are clearly tensions in James’ writings on the ethics of belief both across his career and even within Varieties itself, tensions which some critics think spoil his defense of what he calls religious ‘faith (...)
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  19. Silke Schicktanz, Mark Schweda & Brian Wynne (2012). Erratum To: The Ethics of 'Public Understanding of Ethics'—Why and How Bioethics Expertise Should Include Public and Patients' Voices. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):251-251.score: 387.0
    Ethics” is used as a label for a new kind of expertise in the field of science and technology. At the same time, it is not clear what ethical expertise consists in and what its political status in modern democracies can be. Starting from the “participatory turn” in recent social research and policy, we will argue that bioethical reasoning has to include public views of and attitudes towards biomedicine. We will sketch the outlines of a bioethical conception of (...)
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  20. Joachim Stolz (1996). Bericht: 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science (August 19–25, 1995; Florence, Italy). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 27 (1):167-170.score: 384.0
    The International Union of History and Philosophy of Science organizing the 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science is at its cross-road: the alternative is mass-performance or creative exchange of ideas. The program is criticized because the thematic center in History and Philosophy of Science has been shifted too far into the realm of micro-fields of Logic and the time reduction for presentation and discussion of papers to 20 minutes should be reconsidered. Several outstanding (...)
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  21. Michael C. Loui (2005). Educational Technologies and the Teaching of Ethics in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):435-446.score: 384.0
    To support the teaching of ethics in science and engineering, educational technologies offer a variety of functions: communication between students and instructors, production of documents, distribution of documents, archiving of class sessions, and access to remote resources. Instructors may choose to use these functions of the technologies at different levels of intensity, to support a variety of pedagogies, consistent with accepted good practices. Good pedagogical practices are illustrated in this paper with four examples of uses of educational technologies (...)
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  22. Quey-Jen Yeh & Xiaojun Xu (2010). The Effect of Confucian Work Ethics on Learning About Science and Technology Knowledge and Morality. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):111 - 128.score: 378.0
    While Chinese societies often appear centralized and traditional, presumably impeding technology and innovation, these values may simply reflect the negative-leaning poles of Confucianism. This study proposes a Confucian work ethic dimension that stresses justified tradition. In combination with Western innovative cultures, this Chinese style might facilitate learning about knowledge and morality in an interaction seemingly unique to the Chinese science and technology sector. Specifically, contrary to the Western style that tolerates conflict to achieve harmony, Confucian work ethics -an (...)
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  23. Nancy Tuana (2010). Leading with Ethics, Aiming for Policy: New Opportunities for Philosophy of Science. Synthese 177 (3):471 - 492.score: 375.0
    The goal of this paper is to articulate and advocate for an enhanced role for philosophers of science in the domain of science policy as well as within the science curriculum. I argue that philosophy of science as a field can learn from the successes as well as the mistakes of bioethics and begin to develop a new model that includes robust contributions to the science classroom, research collaborations with scientists, and a role for public (...)
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  24. Anton Moser (2000). The Wisdom of Nature in Integrating Science, Ethics and the Arts. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):365-382.score: 372.0
    This paper deals with an approach to the integration of science (with technology and economics), ethics (with religion and mysticism), the arts (aesthetics) and Nature, in order to establish a world-view based on holistic, evolutionary ethics that could help with problem solving. The author suggests that this integration is possible with the aid of “Nature’s wisdom” which is mirrored in the macroscopic pattern of the ecosphere. The corresponding eco-principles represent the basis for unifying soft and hard sciences (...)
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  25. Ivan T. Frolov (1989). The Ethics of Science: Its Problems and the Sphere of Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (3):235-242.score: 369.0
    Moral principles are indispensable for the assessment of the sciences. Medicine is one of the sciences in need of the guidance of ethics. Ethical principles are put forward and interpreted by society. Vital principles for bioethics include a high standard for professional medical workers, confidentiality between the physician and the patient, and informed consent. Marxist teaching calls for the unity of science and ethics, based on humanist ideas. Keywords: ethics of science, ethical neutrality, professional (...), Marxism-Leninism, humanist ideals, USSR, bioethics CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
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  26. Kathinka Evers (2000). Ethics and the Responsibility of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (1):131-142.score: 369.0
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  27. Elena Aronova (2009). In Search of the Soul in Science: Medical Ethics' Appropriation of Philosophy of Science in the 1970s. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 31 (1):5 - 33.score: 366.0
    This paper examines the deployment of science studies within the field of medical ethics. For a short time, the discourse of medical ethics became a fertile ground for a dialogue between philosophically minded bioethicists and the philosophers of science who responded to Thomas Kuhn's challenge. In their discussion of the validity of Kuhn's work, these bioethicists suggested a distinct interpretation of Kuhn, emphasizing the elements in his account that had been independently developed by Michael Polanyi, and (...)
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  28. E. Wager, S. Fiack, C. Graf, A. Robinson & I. Rowlands (2009). Science Journal Editors' Views on Publication Ethics: Results of an International Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):348-353.score: 366.0
    Background: Breaches of publication ethics such as plagiarism, data fabrication and redundant publication are recognised as forms of research misconduct that can undermine the scientific literature. We surveyed journal editors to determine their views about a range of publication ethics issues. Methods: Questionnaire sent to 524 editors-in-chief of Wiley-Blackwell science journals asking about the severity and frequency of 16 ethical issues at their journals, their confidence in handling such issues, and their awareness and use of guidelines. Results: (...)
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  29. Dennis John Mazur (2007). Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans: A Guide for Irb Members. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 366.0
    Biomedical research on humans is an important part of medical progress. But, when lives are at risk, safety and ethical practices need to be the top priority. The need for the committees that regulate and oversee such research -- institutional review boards, or IRBs -- is growing. IRB members face difficult decisions every day. Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans is a guide for new and veteran members of IRBs that will help them better understand (...)
     
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  30. James Anderson (1997). What Cognitive Science Tells Us About Ethics and the Teaching of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (3):279-291.score: 360.0
    A relatively new and exciting area of collaboration has begun between philosophy of mind and ethics. This paper attempts to explore aspects of this collaboration and how they bear upon traditional ethics. It is the author's contention that much of Western moral philosophy has been guided by largely unrecognized assumptions regarding reason, knowledge and conceptualization, and that when examined against empirical research in cognitive science, these assumptions turn out to be false -- or at the very least, (...)
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  31. P. Purgathofer (2006). " Is Informatics a Design Discipline?"; Poiesis & Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science, 4 (2006), 4; S.?#. [REVIEW] Poiesis and Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science 4:4.score: 360.0
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  32. Darryl R. J. Macer (ed.) (2008). Asia - Pacific Perspectives on Ethics of Science and Technology. UNESCO Bangkok.score: 357.0
    This collection of papers were originally presented during conferences on ethics in science and technology that UNESCO’s Regional Unit for Social and Human Sciences (RUSHSAP) has been convening since 2005. Since intercultural communication and information-sharing are essential components of these deliberations, the books also provide theme-related discourse from the conferences.
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  33. Arlene Judith Klotzko (2004). A Clone of Your Own?: The Science and Ethics of Cloning. Oxford University Press.score: 354.0
    Someday soon (if it hasn't happened in secret already), a human will be cloned, and mankind will embark on a scientific and moral journey whose destination cannot be foretold. In Copycats: The Science and Ethics of Cloning, Arlene Judith Klotzko describes the new world of possibilities that can be glimpsed over the horizon. In a lucid and engaging narrative, she explains that the technology to create clones of living beings already exists, inaugurated in 1996 by Dolly the sheep, (...)
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  34. Colin Allen (2006). Ethics and the Science of Animal Minds. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):375-394.score: 351.0
    Ethicists have commonly appealed to science to bolster their arguments for elevating the moral status of nonhuman animals. I describe a framework within which I take many ethicists to be making such appeals. I focus on an apparent gap in this framework between those properties of animals that are part of the scientific consensus, and those to which ethicists typically appeal in their arguments. I will describe two different ways of diminishing the appearance of the gap, and argue that (...)
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  35. Stellan Welin & Lene Buhl-Mortensen (1998). The Ethics of Doing Policy Relevant Science: The Precautionary Principle and the Significance of Non-Significant Results. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (4):401-412.score: 351.0
    The precautionary principle is a widely accepted policy norm for decision making under uncertainty in environmental management, However, some of the traditional ways of ensuring trustworthy results used in environmental science and of communicating them work contrary to the general goal of providing the political system and the public with as good an input as possible in the decision making process. For example, it is widely accepted that scientists should only communicate results fulfilling the traditional scientific standard for hypothesis (...)
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  36. Domenic Marbaniang (2009). Philosophy of Science: An Introduction. Google Books.score: 348.0
    INTRODUCTION Philosophy of science is a study of the general nature of scientific practice, explanations, theories, and the relation of scientific knowledge ...
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  37. Ruth Chadwick, Professional Ethics and the 'Good' of Science.score: 348.0
    Proposals for an ethical code for scientists raise questions about the usefulness of the framework of professional ethics for debating relevant issues surrounding ethics and science. Is science a profession and if so should its professional ethic be self-derived or subject to external input? What needs to be addressed is the nature of the 'good' that science promotes. Explanations of science as a public good in terms of knowledge and diversity are possibilities, but (...)'s answer to the basic philosophical question of hope in the human condition should not be overlooked. (shrink)
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  38. Richard E. Flathman (1996). The Imagined and Wished for Imperium of Reason and Science: Russell's Empiricism and its Relation to His and Our Ethics and Politics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (2):162-180.score: 348.0
    During most of his long philosophical career, Bertrand Russell was a strong moral subjectivist or emotivist who argued that ethics, because it cannot hope to arrive at truth, is not properly a part of either science or philosophy. In several works, however, most notably Philosophy and Politics and Human Society in Ethics and Politics, he attempted to bring his empiricism and his philosophy of science to bear on moral and other axiological questions. In these writings, he (...)
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  39. Hervé Barreau (2008). Ethics in Face of Science and in Face of Research. In Evandro Agazzi & Fabio Minazzi (eds.), Science and Ethics: The Axiological Contexts of Science. P.I.E. Peter Lang. 14--169.score: 348.0
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  40. James Giordano (2010). Editorial-The Mechanistic Paradox: On the Need for the Reciprocity of Science, Technology, Ethics and Policy. Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics, and Policy 1 (1):G1 - G3.score: 348.0
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  41. John R. Welch (1994). Science and Ethics: Toward a Theory of Ethical Value. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 25 (2):279 - 292.score: 343.0
    This article sketches descriptive and normative components of a theory of ethical value. The normative component, which receives the lion’s share of attention, is developed by adapting Laudan’s levels of scientific discourse. The resulting levels of ethical discourse can be critically addressed through the use of inductive inference, falsification, and causal inference. These techniques are likewise appropriate to the corresponding levels of scientific discourse.
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  42. David S. Bright, Bradley A. Winn & Jason Kanov (2013). Reconsidering Virtue: Differences of Perspective in Virtue Ethics and the Positive Social Sciences. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (4):1-16.score: 342.0
    This paper describes differences in two perspectives on the idea of virtue as a theoretical foundation for positive organizational ethics (POE). The virtue ethics perspective is grounded in the philosophical tradition, has classical roots, and focuses attention on virtue as a property of character. The positive social science perspective is a recent movement (e.g., positive psychology and positive organizational scholarship) that has implications for POE. The positive social science movement operationalizes virtue through an empirical lens that (...)
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  43. Aldrin E. Sweeney (2006). Social and Ethical Dimensions of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):435-464.score: 342.0
    Continuing advances in human ability to manipulate matter at the atomic and molecular levels (i.e. nanoscale science and engineering) offer many previously unimagined possibilities for scientific discovery and technological development. Paralleling these advances in the various science and engineering subdisciplines is the increasing realization that a number of associated social, ethical, environmental, economic and legal dimensions also need to be explored. An important component of such exploration entails the identification and analysis of the ways in which current and (...)
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  44. Hugh Lacey (2010). Values and the Conduct of Science: Principles. Principia 3 (1):57-86.score: 336.0
    In this paper I will propose six principles governing the proper role of moral and social values in the conduct of scientific uivestigation. I offer them for your consideration, and hope that together we can sharpen their formulatton, explore their implications and test their acceptability. In making my proposals I draw considerably from my recent books, Valores e Atividade Científica (VAC, Lacey 1988) and Is Science Value Free? Values and Scientific Understanding (SVF, Lacey 1999a) The detailed argument, and elaboration (...)
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  45. Henk A. M. J. ten Have (2010). Unesco's Activities in Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):7-15.score: 333.0
    UNESCO is an intergovernmental organization with 193 Member States. It is concerned with a broad range of issues regarding education, science and culture. It is the only UN organisation with a mandate in science. Since 1993 it is addressing ethics of science and technology, with special emphasis on bioethics. One major objective of the ethics programme is the development of international normative standards. This is particularly important since many Member States only have a limited infrastructure (...)
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  46. Kenneth W. Goodman & Anita Cava (2008). Bioethics, Business Ethics, and Science: Bioinformatics and the Future of Healthcare. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):361-372.score: 333.0
    The intersection of ethics, computing, and genetics plots a space not yet adequately mapped, despite its importance, indeed, its rapidly growing importance. Its subdomains are well-enough known: or the study of ethical issues in genetics and genomics, is part of core curricula everywhere. Ethics and computing is an established subfield. Computing and geneticshas in little more than a decade progressed from subsubspecialty to the sine qua non of contemporary biomedical research, and it bids fair to transform clinical practice. (...)
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  47. Matthew W. Keefer, Sara E. Wilson, Harry Dankowicz & Michael C. Loui (2013). The Importance of Formative Assessment in Science and Engineering Ethics Education: Some Evidence and Practical Advice. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-12.score: 333.0
    Recent research in ethics education shows a potentially problematic variation in content, curricular materials, and instruction. While ethics instruction is now widespread, studies have identified significant variation in both the goals and methods of ethics education, leaving researchers to conclude that many approaches may be inappropriately paired with goals that are unachievable. This paper speaks to these concerns by demonstrating the importance of aligning classroom-based assessments to clear ethical learning objectives in order to help students and instructors (...)
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  48. Sean Jennings (2012). Response to Schrag: What Are Ethics Committees for Anyway? A Defence of Social Science Research Ethics Review. Research Ethics 8 (2):87-96.score: 333.0
    Zachary Schrag would like to put the burden of proof for continuation of research ethics review in the Social Sciences on those who advocate for research ethics committees (RECs), and asks that we take the concerns that he raises seriously. I separate his concerns into a principled issue and a number of pragmatic issues. The principled issue concerns the justification for having research ethics committees; the pragmatic issues concern questions such as the effectiveness of review and the (...)
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  49. Frederik Vinding Kruse (1975). The Foundation of Human Thought: The Problem of Science and Ethics. Greenwood Press.score: 333.0
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  50. Tim J. Watts (1987). Ethics of Information Science. Vance Bibliographies.score: 333.0
     
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