Search results for 'Ethics of Science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  28
    Guido Van Steendam, András Dinnyés, Jacques Mallet, Rolando Meloni, Carlos Romeo Casabona, Jorge Guerra González, Josef Kuře, Eörs Szathmáry, Jan Vorstenbosch, Péter Molnár, David Edbrooke, Judit Sándor, Ferenc Oberfrank, Ron Cole-Turner, István Hargittai & Beate Littig (2006). Summary: The Budapest Meeting 2005 Intensified Networking on Ethics of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):415-420.
    This paper reports on the meeting of the Sounding Board of the EU Reprogenetics Project that was held in Budapest, Hungary, 6–9 November 2005. The Reprogenetics Project runs from 2004 until 2007 and has a brief to study the ethical aspects of human reproductive cloning and germline gene therapy. Discussions during The Budapest Meeting are reported in depth in this paper as well as the initiatives to involve the participating groups and others in ongoing collaborations with the goal of forming (...)
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  2.  23
    Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.
    Research Ethics Committees or Institutional Review Boards are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given that research in social sciences (...)
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  3.  20
    Laura Westra (1997). Post-Normal Science, the Precautionary Principle and the Ethics of Integrity. Foundations of Science 2 (2):237-262.
    Present laws and regulations even in democratic countries are not sufficient to prevent the grave environmental threats we face. Further, even environmental ethics, when they remain anthropocentric cannot propose a better approach. I argue that, taking in considerations the precautionary principle, and adopting the perspective of post-normal science, the ethics of integrity suggest a better way to reduce ecological threats and promote the human good globally.
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  4. Tsjalling Swierstra & Arie Rip (2007). Nano-Ethics as NEST-Ethics: Patterns of Moral Argumentation About New and Emerging Science and Technology. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (1):3-20.
    There might not be a specific nano-ethics, but there definitely is an ethics of new & emerging science and technology (NEST), with characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation. Ethical discussion in and around nanoscience and technology reflects such NEST-ethics. We offer an inventory of the arguments, and show patterns in their evolution, in arenas full of proponents and opponents. We also show that there are some nano-specific issues: in how size matters, and when agency is (...)
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  5.  30
    M. A. B. Degenhardt (1986). The 'Ethics of Belief and Education in Science and Morals. Journal of Moral Education 15 (2):109-118.
    Educational worries about indoctrination are linked to matters of rationality and of the ethics of belief. These are both threatened by too 'open' approaches to moral education and by too 'closed' approaches to science education. The moral importance of what is involved points to the need to inform the teaching of all disciplines by reflection on their rational foundations.
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  6.  14
    René van Woudenberg & Joelle Rothuizen-van der Steen (2016). Science and the Ethics of Belief. An Examination of Philipse’s ‘Rule R’. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 47 (2):349-362.
    It has recently been argued that the following Rule should be part of any characterization of science: Claims concerning specific disputed facts should be endorsed only if they are sufficiently supported by the application of validated methods of research or discovery, and moreover that acceptance of this Rule should lead one to reject religious belief. This paper argues, first, that the Rule, as stated, should not be accepted as it suffers from a number of problems. And second, that even (...)
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  7.  4
    Kathleen Eggleson (2014). Transatlantic Divergences in Citizen Science Ethics—Comparative Analysis of the DIYbio Code of Ethics Drafts of 2011. NanoEthics 8 (2):187-192.
    Codes of ethics were drafted by participants in the European and North American Congresses of DIYbio, a single global organization of informal biotechnology practitioners, in 2011. In general, the existence of a code of ethics amongst a community is itself significant. Codes of professional ethics are common in scientific and engineering fields, as well as in DIY communities. It is also significant, and highly unusual, that DIYbio has maintained two separate codes of ethics years after their (...)
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  8.  16
    Hyemin Han (2015). Virtue Ethics, Positive Psychology, and a New Model of Science and Engineering Ethics Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):441-460.
    This essay develops a new conceptual framework of science and engineering ethics education based on virtue ethics and positive psychology. Virtue ethicists and positive psychologists have argued that current rule-based moral philosophy, psychology, and education cannot effectively promote students’ moral motivation for actual moral behavior and may even lead to negative outcomes, such as moral schizophrenia. They have suggested that their own theoretical framework of virtue ethics and positive psychology can contribute to the effective promotion of (...)
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  9.  63
    David B. Resnik (1998). The Ethics of Science: An Introduction. Routledge.
    During the past decade scientists, public policy analysts, politicians, and laypeople, have become increasingly aware of the importance of ethical conduct in scientific research. In this timely book, David B. Resnik introduces the reader to the ethical dilemmas and questions that arise in scientific research. Some of the issues addressed in the book include ethical decision-making, the goals and methods of science, and misconduct in science. The Ethics of Science also discusses significant case studies such as (...)
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  10.  34
    Dieter Birnbacher (1999). Ethics and Social Science: Which Kind of Co-Operation? [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):319-336.
    The relation between ethics and social science is often conceived as complementary, both disciplines cooperating in the solution of concrete moral problems. Against this, the paper argues that not only applied ethics but even certain parts of general ethics have to incorporate sociological and psychological data and theories from the start. Applied ethics depends on social science in order to asses the impact of its own principles on the concrete realities which these principles are (...)
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  11. William J. McKinney (1996). Prediction and Rolston's Environmental Ethics: Lessons From the Philosophy of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):429-440.
    Rolston (1988) argues that in order to act ethically in the environment, moral agents must assume that their actions are potentially harmful, and then strive to prove otherwise before implementing that action. In order to determine whether or not an action in the environment is harmful requires the tools of applied epistemology in order to act in accord with Rolston’s ethical prescription. This link between ethics and epistemology demands a closer look at the relationship between confirmation theory, particularly notions (...)
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  12.  3
    Guido Van Steendam, András Dinnyés, Jacques Mallet, Rolando Meloni, Carlos Romeo Casabona, Jorge Guerra González, Josef Kuře, Eörs Szathmáry, Jan Vorstenbosch, Péter Molnár, David Edbrooke, Judit Sándor, Ferenc Oberfrank, Ron Cole-Turner, István Hargittai & Beate Littig (2006). The Budapest Meeting 2005 Intensified Networking on Ethics of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):731-793.
    This paper reports on the meeting of the Sounding Board of the EU Reprogenetics Project that was held in Budapest, Hungary, 6–9 November 2005. The Reprogenetics Project runs from 2004 until 2007 and has a brief to study the ethical aspects of human reproductive cloning and germline gene therapy. Discussions during The Budapest Meeting are reported in depth in this paper as well as the initiatives to involve the participating groups and others in ongoing collaborations with the goal of forming (...)
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  13.  21
    Bernice Bovenkerk & Franck L. B. Meijboom (2013). Fish Welfare in Aquaculture: Explicating the Chain of Interactions Between Science and Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):41-61.
    Aquaculture is the fastest growing animal-production sector in the world. This leads to the question how we should guarantee fish welfare. Implementing welfare standards presupposes that we know how to weigh, define, and measure welfare. While at first glance these seem empirical questions, they cannot be answered without ethical reflection. Normative assumptions are made when weighing, defining, and measuring welfare. Moreover, the focus on welfare presupposes that welfare is a morally important concept. This in turn presupposes that we can define (...)
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  14.  20
    Michael C. Loui (2005). Educational Technologies and the Teaching of Ethics in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):435-446.
    To support the teaching of ethics in science and engineering, educational technologies offer a variety of functions: communication between students and instructors, production of documents, distribution of documents, archiving of class sessions, and access to remote resources. Instructors may choose to use these functions of the technologies at different levels of intensity, to support a variety of pedagogies, consistent with accepted good practices. Good pedagogical practices are illustrated in this paper with four examples of uses of educational technologies (...)
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  15.  11
    Martin Tolich (2008). Guidelines for Community-Based Ethics Review of Children's Science Fair Projects. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):303-310.
    Low-level community based ethics committees staffed by teachers, parents and community representatives can readily review children’s science fair projects subject to the revision of two core assumptions currently governing children’s Science Fairs. The first part of the paper recasts the New Zealand Royal Society guidelines from its primary emphasis on risk to a new assumption, without benefit there can be no risk. Equally, this revision gives more prominence to the participant information sheet, allowing it to act as (...)
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  16. Klaus Hoeyer (2006). Ethics Wars”: Reflections on the Antagonism Between Bioethicists and Social Science Observers of Biomedicine. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):203 - 227.
    Social scientists often lament the fact that philosophically trained ethicists pay limited attention to the insights they generate. This paper presents an overview of tendencies in sociological and anthropological studies of morality, ethics and bioethics, and suggests that a lack in philosophical interest might be related to a tendency among social scientists to employ either a deficit model (social science perspectives accommodate the sense of context that philosophical ethics lacks), a replacement model (social scientists have finally found (...)
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  17.  9
    Abraham Edel (1961). Science and the Structure of Ethics. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.
    Science and the Structure of Ethics Abraham Edel I. The Nature and Complexity of the Problem. Issues in the "Relation of Science and Ethics" Traditional ...
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  18.  68
    Christine James (2015). Data Science and Mass Media: Seeking a Hermeneutic Ethics of Information. Proceedings of the Society for Phenomenology and Media, Vol. 15, 2014, Pages 49-58 15 (2014):49-58.
    In recent years, the growing academic field called “Data Science” has made many promises. On closer inspection, relatively few of these promises have come to fruition. A critique of Data Science from the phenomenological tradition can take many forms. This paper addresses the promise of “participation” in Data Science, taking inspiration from Paul Majkut’s 2000 work in Glimpse, “Empathy’s Impostor: Interactivity and Intersubjectivity,” and some insights from Heidegger’s "The Question Concerning Technology." The description of Data Science (...)
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  19.  21
    Nancy Tuana (2010). Leading with Ethics, Aiming for Policy: New Opportunities for Philosophy of Science. Synthese 177 (3):471 - 492.
    The goal of this paper is to articulate and advocate for an enhanced role for philosophers of science in the domain of science policy as well as within the science curriculum. I argue that philosophy of science as a field can learn from the successes as well as the mistakes of bioethics and begin to develop a new model that includes robust contributions to the science classroom, research collaborations with scientists, and a role for public (...)
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  20.  63
    Ivan T. Frolov (1989). The Ethics of Science: Its Problems and the Sphere of Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (3):235-242.
    Moral principles are indispensable for the assessment of the sciences. Medicine is one of the sciences in need of the guidance of ethics. Ethical principles are put forward and interpreted by society. Vital principles for bioethics include a high standard for professional medical workers, confidentiality between the physician and the patient, and informed consent. Marxist teaching calls for the unity of science and ethics, based on humanist ideas. Keywords: ethics of science, ethical neutrality, professional (...), Marxism-Leninism, humanist ideals, USSR, bioethics CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
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  21.  4
    F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch I: Theory of Science and Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):207-219.
    Richard Koch first made his appearance in the 1920s with works published on the foundations of medicine. These publications describe the character of medicine as an action and the status of medicine within the theory of science. One of his conclusions is that medicine is not a science in the original sense of the word, but a practical discipline. It serves a practical purpose: to heal the sick. All medical knowledge is oriented towards this purpose, which also defines (...)
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  22.  30
    E. Wager, S. Fiack, C. Graf, A. Robinson & I. Rowlands (2009). Science Journal Editors' Views on Publication Ethics: Results of an International Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):348-353.
    Background: Breaches of publication ethics such as plagiarism, data fabrication and redundant publication are recognised as forms of research misconduct that can undermine the scientific literature. We surveyed journal editors to determine their views about a range of publication ethics issues. Methods: Questionnaire sent to 524 editors-in-chief of Wiley-Blackwell science journals asking about the severity and frequency of 16 ethical issues at their journals, their confidence in handling such issues, and their awareness and use of guidelines. Results: (...)
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  23. James Anderson (1997). What Cognitive Science Tells Us About Ethics and the Teaching of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (3):279-291.
    A relatively new and exciting area of collaboration has begun between philosophy of mind and ethics. This paper attempts to explore aspects of this collaboration and how they bear upon traditional ethics. It is the author's contention that much of Western moral philosophy has been guided by largely unrecognized assumptions regarding reason, knowledge and conceptualization, and that when examined against empirical research in cognitive science, these assumptions turn out to be false -- or at the very least, (...)
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  24.  48
    Eva M. Buccioni (1998). Michael J. Reiss and Roger Straughan, Improving Nature? The Science and Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (1):49-55.
  25.  21
    Hugh Lehman (1998). John Leslie, the End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (1):63-65.
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  26.  16
    Kathinka Evers (2000). Ethics and the Responsibility of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (1):131-142.
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  27.  29
    Quey-Jen Yeh & Xiaojun Xu (2010). The Effect of Confucian Work Ethics on Learning About Science and Technology Knowledge and Morality. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):111 - 128.
    While Chinese societies often appear centralized and traditional, presumably impeding technology and innovation, these values may simply reflect the negative-leaning poles of Confucianism. This study proposes a Confucian work ethic dimension that stresses justified tradition. In combination with Western innovative cultures, this Chinese style might facilitate learning about knowledge and morality in an interaction seemingly unique to the Chinese science and technology sector. Specifically, contrary to the Western style that tolerates conflict to achieve harmony, Confucian work ethics -an (...)
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  28.  1
    P. Purgathofer (2006). " Is Informatics a Design Discipline?"; Poiesis & Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science, 4 (2006), 4; S.?#. [REVIEW] Poiesis and Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science 4:4.
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  29. Dennis John Mazur (2007). Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans: A Guide for Irb Members. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Biomedical research on humans is an important part of medical progress. But, when lives are at risk, safety and ethical practices need to be the top priority. The need for the committees that regulate and oversee such research -- institutional review boards, or IRBs -- is growing. IRB members face difficult decisions every day. Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans is a guide for new and veteran members of IRBs that will help them better understand (...)
     
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  30. Darryl R. J. Macer (ed.) (2008). Asia - Pacific Perspectives on Ethics of Science and Technology. UNESCO Bangkok.
    This collection of papers were originally presented during conferences on ethics in science and technology that UNESCO’s Regional Unit for Social and Human Sciences (RUSHSAP) has been convening since 2005. Since intercultural communication and information-sharing are essential components of these deliberations, the books also provide theme-related discourse from the conferences.
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  31.  58
    Mark Johnson (1993). Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics. University of Chicago Press.
    Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason. According to the Western moral tradition, we make ethical decisions by applying universal laws to concrete situations. But Johnson shows how research in cognitive science undermines this view and reveals that imagination has an essential role in ethical deliberation. Expanding his innovative studies of human reason in Metaphors (...)
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  32.  22
    Elena Aronova (2009). In Search of the Soul in Science: Medical Ethics' Appropriation of Philosophy of Science in the 1970s. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 31 (1):5 - 33.
    This paper examines the deployment of science studies within the field of medical ethics. For a short time, the discourse of medical ethics became a fertile ground for a dialogue between philosophically minded bioethicists and the philosophers of science who responded to Thomas Kuhn's challenge. In their discussion of the validity of Kuhn's work, these bioethicists suggested a distinct interpretation of Kuhn, emphasizing the elements in his account that had been independently developed by Michael Polanyi, and (...)
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  33. Anton Moser (2000). The Wisdom of Nature in Integrating Science, Ethics and the Arts. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):365-382.
    This paper deals with an approach to the integration of science (with technology and economics), ethics (with religion and mysticism), the arts (aesthetics) and Nature, in order to establish a world-view based on holistic, evolutionary ethics that could help with problem solving. The author suggests that this integration is possible with the aid of “Nature’s wisdom” which is mirrored in the macroscopic pattern of the ecosphere. The corresponding eco-principles represent the basis for unifying soft and hard sciences (...)
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  34.  4
    Edwin E. Gantt (2001). The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory, and Ethics of Sexual Orientation. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):98.
    Reviews the book, The mismeasure of desire: The science, theory, and ethics of sexual orientation by Edward Stein . It would hardly be overstating the matter to say that perhaps the single most hotly debated issue in both psychology and contemporary American culture is the nature and origins of human sexual desires. In opposition to the currently more widely accepted thesis that sexual orientation is determined at birth, philosopher and educator Edward Stein argues in this new book that (...)
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  35.  15
    No Authorship Indicated (2001). Review of The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory, and Ethics of Sexual Orientation. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):98-98.
    Reviews the book, The mismeasure of desire: The science, theory, and ethics of sexual orientation by Edward Stein . It would hardly be overstating the matter to say that perhaps the single most hotly debated issue in both psychology and contemporary American culture is the nature and origins of human sexual desires. In opposition to the currently more widely accepted thesis that sexual orientation is determined at birth, philosopher and educator Edward Stein argues in this new book that (...)
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  36.  3
    No Authorship Indicated (1999). Review of Animal Models of Human Psychology: Critique of Science, Ethics, and Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):227-228.
    Reviews the book, Animal models of human psychology: Critique of science, ethics, and policy by Kenneth J. Shapiro . The principle focus of most of this text is on the present-day use of animals in psychological research. In particular, Shapiro examines contemporary animal models of eating disorders, showing how psychology came to rely so heavily on animal models in the first place and how prevalent scientific attitudes about the use of animals in the laboratory have taken shape over (...)
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  37.  29
    Stellan Welin & Lene Buhl-Mortensen (1998). The Ethics of Doing Policy Relevant Science: The Precautionary Principle and the Significance of Non-Significant Results. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (4):401-412.
    The precautionary principle is a widely accepted policy norm for decision making under uncertainty in environmental management, However, some of the traditional ways of ensuring trustworthy results used in environmental science and of communicating them work contrary to the general goal of providing the political system and the public with as good an input as possible in the decision making process. For example, it is widely accepted that scientists should only communicate results fulfilling the traditional scientific standard for hypothesis (...)
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  38.  8
    Daniel J. Hicks & Thomas A. Stapleford, The Virtues of Scientific Practice: MacIntyre, Virtue Ethics, and the Historiography of Science.
    “Practice” has become a ubiquitous term in the history of science, and yet historians have not always reflected on its philosophical import and especially on its potential connections with ethics. In this essay, we draw on the work of the virtue ethicist Alasdair MacIntyre to develop a theory of “communal practices” and explore how such an approach can inform the history of science, including allegations about the corruption of science by wealth or power; consideration of scientific (...)
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  39.  76
    Ruth Chadwick, Professional Ethics and the 'Good' of Science.
    Proposals for an ethical code for scientists raise questions about the usefulness of the framework of professional ethics for debating relevant issues surrounding ethics and science. Is science a profession and if so should its professional ethic be self-derived or subject to external input? What needs to be addressed is the nature of the 'good' that science promotes. Explanations of science as a public good in terms of knowledge and diversity are possibilities, but (...)'s answer to the basic philosophical question of hope in the human condition should not be overlooked. (shrink)
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  40.  38
    Arlene Judith Klotzko (2004). A Clone of Your Own?: The Science and Ethics of Cloning. Oxford University Press.
    Someday soon (if it hasn't happened in secret already), a human will be cloned, and mankind will embark on a scientific and moral journey whose destination cannot be foretold. In Copycats: The Science and Ethics of Cloning, Arlene Judith Klotzko describes the new world of possibilities that can be glimpsed over the horizon. In a lucid and engaging narrative, she explains that the technology to create clones of living beings already exists, inaugurated in 1996 by Dolly the sheep, (...)
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  41.  1
    A. J. Dawson & S. M. Yentis (2007). Contesting the Science/Ethics Distinction in the Review of Clinical Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):165-167.
    Recent policy in relation to clinical research proposals in the UK has distinguished between two types of review: scientific and ethical. This distinction has been formally enshrined in the recent changes to research ethics committee structure and operating procedures, introduced as the UK response to the EU Directive on clinical trials. Recent reviews and recommendations have confirmed the place of the distinction and the separate review processes. However, serious reservations can be mounted about the science/ethics distinction and (...)
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  42.  10
    James Giordano (2010). Editorial-The Mechanistic Paradox: On the Need for the Reciprocity of Science, Technology, Ethics and Policy. Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics, and Policy 1 (1):G1 - G3.
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  43.  2
    Hervé Barreau (2008). Ethics in Face of Science and in Face of Research. In Evandro Agazzi & Fabio Minazzi (eds.), Science and Ethics: The Axiological Contexts of Science. P.I.E. Peter Lang 14--169.
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  44. Andrew F. Reeve (2000). Incommensurability in Ethics and in the Philosophy of Science. Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    'Incommensurability' has, in the last forty years, gained wide currency in the literature of philosophy. Kuhn and Feyerabend used the term in the early 1960's to describe an issue in the philosophy of science. They suggested that, when scientific theories are introduced that are significantly different from their predecessors, it may happen that the meanings of key terms differ significantly, and to the extent that scientists may be unable to fully comprehend the new theory until they experience a form (...)
     
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  45. Cass R. Sunstein (2016). The Ethics of Influence: Government in the Age of Behavioral Science. Cambridge University Press.
    In recent years, 'Nudge Units' or 'Behavioral Insights Teams' have been created in the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and other nations. All over the world, public officials are using the behavioral sciences to protect the environment, promote employment and economic growth, reduce poverty, and increase national security. In this book, Cass R. Sunstein, the eminent legal scholar and best-selling co-author of Nudge, breaks new ground with a deep yet highly readable investigation into the ethical issues surrounding nudges, choice (...)
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  46. Colin Allen (2006). Ethics and the Science of Animal Minds. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):375-394.
    Ethicists have commonly appealed to science to bolster their arguments for elevating the moral status of nonhuman animals. I describe a framework within which I take many ethicists to be making such appeals. I focus on an apparent gap in this framework between those properties of animals that are part of the scientific consensus, and those to which ethicists typically appeal in their arguments. I will describe two different ways of diminishing the appearance of the gap, and argue that (...)
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  47.  2
    Archie J. Bahm (ed.) (1994). Ethics: The Science of Oughtness. Rodopi.
    This book makes a forceful case for the scientific aspirations of ethics and for the necessity of ethics to our humanity. It is written as a challenge to those who are reluctant to recognize that science can deal decisively with questions in ethical theory. It throws new light on group responsibilities, apparent oughtness, and the responsibility we have for expanding our awareness of responsibilities.
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  48.  43
    H. Kuhse (2005). A Clone of Your Own. The Science and Ethics of Cloning. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):e1-e1.
    A Clone of your Own provides a short, lucid, and very readable introduction to the science of human cloning and some of the central ethical issues surrounding it.The attractive 162 page pocket sized book is interspersed with original and often quirky drawings by David Mann. These drawings, as well as a good number of well chosen and sometimes equally quirky contemporary and archival photographs, provide context and texture and even a sense of wonder to the scientific and ethical discussion. (...)
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  49.  17
    Kenneth W. Goodman & Anita Cava (2008). Bioethics, Business Ethics, and Science: Bioinformatics and the Future of Healthcare. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (4):361-372.
    The intersection of ethics, computing, and genetics plots a space not yet adequately mapped, despite its importance, indeed, its rapidly growing importance. Its subdomains are well-enough known: or the study of ethical issues in genetics and genomics, is part of core curricula everywhere. Ethics and computing is an established subfield. Computing and geneticshas in little more than a decade progressed from subsubspecialty to the sine qua non of contemporary biomedical research, and it bids fair to transform clinical practice. (...)
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  50.  12
    Şerife Tekin (2014). Psychiatric Taxonomy: At the Crossroads of Science and Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):513-514.
    The scientific investigation of mental disorders is an invigorating area of inquiry for philosophers of mind and science who are interested in exploring the nature of typical and atypical cognition as well as the overarching scientific project of ‘carving nature at its joints’. It is also important for philosophers of medicine and bioethicists who are concerned with concepts of disease and with the development of effective and ethical treatments of mental disorders and the just distribution of mental health services. (...)
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