Search results for 'Ethics, Clinical' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Mia Svantesson, Jan Karlsson, Pierre Boitte, Jan Schildman, Linda Dauwerse, Guy Widdershoven, Reidar Pedersen, Martijn Huisman & Bert Molewijk (2014). Outcomes of Moral Case Deliberation - the Development of an Evaluation Instrument for Clinical Ethics Support (the Euro-MCD). BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):30.score: 210.0
    Clinical ethics support, in particular Moral Case Deliberation, aims to support health care providers to manage ethically difficult situations. However, there is a lack of evaluation instruments regarding outcomes of clinical ethics support in general and regarding Moral Case Deliberation (MCD) in particular. There also is a lack of clarity and consensuses regarding which MCD outcomes are beneficial. In addition, MCD outcomes might be context-sensitive. Against this background, there is a need for a standardised but flexible outcome evaluation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andrea Dörries, Pierre Boitte, Ana Borovecki, Jean-Philippe Cobbaut, Stella Reiter-Theil & Anne-Marie Slowther (2011). Institutional Challenges for Clinical Ethics Committees. HEC Forum 23 (3):193-205.score: 204.0
    Clinical ethics committees (CECs) have been developing in many countries since the 1980s, more recently in the transitional countries in Eastern Europe. With their increasing profile they are now faced with a range of questions and challenges regarding their position within the health care organizations in which they are situated: Should CECs be independent bodies with a critical role towards institutional management, or should they be an integral part of the hospital organization? In this paper, we discuss the organizational (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. N. O. Mokwunye, E. G. DeRenzo, V. A. Brown & J. J. Lynch (2011). Training in Clinical Ethics: Launching the Clinical Ethics Immersion Course at the Center for Ethics at the Washington Hospital Center. Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (2):139-146.score: 204.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. A. M. Slowther, L. McClimans & C. Price (2012). Development of Clinical Ethics Services in the UK: A National Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (4):210-214.score: 198.0
    Background In 2001 a report on the provision of clinical ethics support in UK healthcare institutions identified 20 clinical ethics committees. Since then there has been no systematic evaluation or documentation of their work at a national level. Recent national surveys of clinical ethics services in other countries have identified wide variation in practice and scope of activities. Objective To describe the current provision of ethics support in the UK and its development since 2001. Method A postal/electronic (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Sally Bean (2011). Navigating the Murky Intersection Between Clinical and Organizational Ethics: A Hybrid Case Taxonomy. Bioethics 25 (6):320-325.score: 192.0
    Ethical challenges that arise within healthcare delivery institutions are currently categorized as either clinical or organizational, based on the type of issue. Despite this common binary issue-based methodology, empirical study and increasing academic dialogue indicate that a clear line cannot easily be drawn between organizational and clinical ethics. Disagreement around end-of-life treatments, for example, often spawn value differences amongst parties at both organizational and clinical levels and requires a resolution to address both the case at hand and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. George J. Agich (2009). The Issue of Expertise in Clinical Ethics. Diametros 22:3-20.score: 192.0
    The proliferation of ethics committees and ethics consultation services has engendered a discussion of the issue of the expertise of those who provide clinical ethics consultation services. In this paper, I discuss two aspects of this issue: the cognitive dimension or content knowledge that the clinical ethics consultant should possess and the practical dimension or set of dispositions, skills, and traits that are necessary for effective ethics consultation. I argue that the failure to differentiate and fully explicate these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Diego Garcia (2001). Moral Deliberation: The Role of Methodologies in Clinical Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):223-232.score: 192.0
    The experience of the last thirty years has shown that whether the different methodologies used in clinical ethics work well or not depends on certain external factors, such as the mentality with which they are used. This article aims to analyze two of these mentalities: the “dilemmatic” and the “problematic.” The former uses preferably the decision-making theory, whilst the latter emphasizes above all the role of deliberation. The author considers that Clinical Ethics must be deliberationist, and that only (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Bert Molewijk, Dick Kleinlugtenbelt, Scott Pugh & Guy Widdershoven (2011). Emotions and Clinical Ethics Support. A Moral Inquiry Into Emotions in Moral Case Deliberation. HEC Forum 23 (4):257-268.score: 192.0
    Emotions play an important part in moral life. Within clinical ethics support (CES), one should take into account the crucial role of emotions in moral cases in clinical practice. In this paper, we present an Aristotelian approach to emotions. We argue that CES can help participants deal with emotions by fostering a joint process of investigation of the role of emotions in a case. This investigation goes beyond empathy with and moral judgment of the emotions of the case (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton (2011). Responsibility After the Apparent End: 'Following-Up' in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Bioethics 25 (7):413-424.score: 192.0
    Clinical ethics literature typically presents ethics consultations as having clear beginnings and clear ends. Experience in actual clinical ethics practice, however, reflects a different characterization, particularly when the moral experiences of ethics consultants are included in the discussion. In response, this article emphasizes listening and learning about moral experience as core activities associated with clinical ethics consultation. This focus reveals that responsibility in actual clinical ethics practice is generated within the moral scope of an ethics consultant's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Reidar Pedersen, Victoria Akre & Reidun Førde (2009). Barriers and Challenges in Clinical Ethics Consultations: The Experiences of Nine Clinical Ethics Committees. Bioethics 23 (8):460-469.score: 192.0
    Clinical ethics committees have recently been established in nearly all Norwegian hospital trusts. One important task for these committees is clinical ethics consultations. This qualitative study explores significant barriers confronting the ethics committees in providing such consultation services. The interviews with the committees indicate that there is a substantial need for clinical ethics support services and, in general, the committee members expressed a great deal of enthusiasm for the committee work. They also reported, however, that tendencies to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Osborne P. Wiggins & John Z. Sadler (2005). A Window Into Richard M. Zaner's Clinical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (1):1-6.score: 192.0
    This essay introduces a thematic issue focused on the contributions to clinical ethics and the philosophy of medicine by Richard M. Zaner. We consider the apparent divorce of Zaners philosophical roots from his recent narrative immersions into the blooming, buzzing confusions of clinical-moral lifeworlds. Our considerations of the Zanerian context and origins of the clinical encounter introduce the fundamental questions faced by Zaner and his commentators in this issue, questions about the role of ethics consultants, moral authority, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Simon Woods & Pauline Mccormack (2013). Disputing the Ethics of Research: The Challenge From Bioethics and Patient Activism to the Interpretation of the Declaration of Helsinki in Clinical Trials. Bioethics 27 (5):243-250.score: 192.0
    In this paper we argue that the consensus around normative standards for the ethics of research in clinical trials, strongly influenced by the Declaration of Helsinki, is perceived from various quarters as too conservative and potentially restrictive of research that is seen as urgent and necessary. We examine this problem from the perspective of various challengers who argue for alternative approaches to what ought or ought not to be permitted. Key themes within this analysis will examine these claims and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton (2010). Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):171-171.score: 192.0
    Erratum to: Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? Content Type Journal Article Pages 171-171 DOI 10.1007/s10730-010-9132-7 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Saint Louis University Tenet Chair of Health Care Ethics, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics Salus Center, Room 527, 3545 Lafayette Ave St. Louis MO 63104-1314 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Ave., 4th Floor, Suite 400 Nashville TN 37203 USA Mark J. Bliton, Vanderbilt (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Leah McClimans, Anne-Marie Slowther & Michael Parker (2012). Can UK Clinical Ethics Committees Improve Quality of Care? HEC Forum 24 (2):139-147.score: 192.0
    Failings in patient care and quality in NHS Trusts have become a recurring theme over the past few years. In this paper, we examine the Care Quality Commission’s Guidance about Compliance : Essential Standards of Quality and Safety and ask how NHS Trusts might be better supported in fulfilling the regulations specified therein. We argue that clinical ethics committees (CECs) have a role to play in this regard. We make this argument by attending to the many ethical elements that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Eric Racine (2008). Enriching Our Views on Clinical Ethics: Results of a Qualitative Study of the Moral Psychology of Healthcare Ethics Committee Members. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (1):57-67.score: 192.0
    The contribution of healthcare ethics committee (HEC) members to HECs is fundamental. However, little is known about how HEC members view clinical ethics. We report results from a qualitative study of the moral psychology of HEC members. We found that contrary to the existing Kohlberg-based studies, HEC members hold a pragmatic non-expert view of clinical ethics based mainly on respect for persons and a commitment to the patient’s good. In general, HEC members hold deflationary views regarding moral theory. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rouven Porz, Elleke Landeweer & Guy Widdershoven (2011). Theory and Practice of Clinical Ethics Support Services: Narrative and Hermeneutical Perspectives. Bioethics 25 (7):354-360.score: 192.0
    In this paper we introduce narrative and hermeneutical perspectives to clinical ethics support services (CESS). We propose a threefold consideration of ‘theory’ and show how it is interwoven with ‘practice’ as we go along. First, we look at theory in its foundational role: in our case ‘narrative ethics’ and ‘philosophical hermeneutics’ provide a theoretical base for clinical ethics by focusing on human identities entangled in stories and on moral understanding as a dialogical process. Second, we consider the role (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stella Reiter-Theil (2003). Balancing the Perspectives. The Patient's Role in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):247-254.score: 192.0
    The debate and implementation of Clinical Ethics Consultation (CEC) is still in its beginnings in Europe and the issue of the patient's perspective has been neglected so far, especially at the theoretical and methodological level. At the practical level, recommendations about the involvement of the patient or his/her relatives are missing, reflecting the general lack of quality and practice standards in CEC. Balance of perspectives is a challenge in any interpersonal consultation, which has led to great efforts to develop (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Rachelle Barina (2014). Ethics Outside of Inpatient Care: The Need for Alliances Between Clinical and Organizational Ethics. HEC Forum 26 (4):309-323.score: 192.0
    The norms and practices of clinical ethics took form relative to the environment and relationships of hospital care. These practices do not easily translate into the outpatient context because the environment and relational dynamics differ. Yet, as outpatient care becomes the center of health care delivery, the experiences of ethical tension for outpatient clinicians warrant greater responses. Although a substantial body of literature on the nature of the doctor–physician relationship has been developed and could provide theoretical groundwork for an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Linda Dauwerse, Froukje Weidema, Tineke Abma, Bert Molewijk & Guy Widdershoven (2014). Implicit and Explicit Clinical Ethics Support in The Netherlands: A Mixed Methods Overview Study. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 26 (2):95-109.score: 192.0
    Internationally, the prevalence of clinical ethics support (CES) in health care has increased over the years. Previous research on CES focused primarily on ethics committees and ethics consultation, mostly within the context of hospital care. The purpose of this article is to investigate the prevalence of different kinds of CES in various Dutch health care domains, including hospital care, mental health care, elderly care and care for people with an intellectual disability. A mixed methods design was used including two (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Marta Spranzi (2013). Clinical Ethics and Values: How Do Norms Evolve From Practice? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):93-103.score: 192.0
    Bioethics laws in France have just undergone a revision process. The bioethics debate is often cast in terms of ethical principles and norms resisting emerging social and technological practices. This leads to the expression of confrontational attitudes based on widely differing interpretations of the same principles and values, and ultimately results in a deadlock. In this paper I would like to argue that focusing on values, as opposed to norms and principles, provides an interesting perspective on the evolution of norms. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Deborah Swiderski, Katharine Ettinger, Mayris Webber & Nancy Dubler (2010). The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):65-72.score: 192.0
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the QI tool , to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process was marked by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Reidun Førde & Thor Willy Ruud Hansen (2014). Do Organizational and Clinical Ethics in a Hospital Setting Need Different Venues? HEC Forum 26 (2):147-158.score: 192.0
    The structure of ethics work in a hospital is complex. Professional ethics, research ethics and clinical ethics committees (CECs) are important parts of this structure, in addition to laws and national and institutional codes of ethics. In Norway all hospital trusts have a CEC, most of these discuss cases by means of a method which seeks to include relevant guidelines and laws into the discussion. In recent years many committees have received more cases which have concerned questions of principle. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jos V. M. Welie (1998). Clinical Ethics: Theory or Practice? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (3):295-312.score: 192.0
    This article starts with a brief historical account of the ongoing debate about the status of clinical ethics: theory of practice. The author goes on to argue that clinical ethics is best understood as a practice. However, its practicality should not be measured by the extent to which clinical-ethical consultants manage to mediate or negotiate resolutions to ethical conflicts. Rather, clinical ethics is practical because it is characterized by a profound concern for the well-being of individual (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Reidun Førde, Reidar Pedersen & Victoria Akre (2008). Clinicians' Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Consultations in Norway: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):17-25.score: 192.0
    Clinical ethics committees have existed in Norway since 1996. By now all hospital trusts have one. An evaluation of these committees’ work was started in 2004. This paper presents results from an interview study of eight clinicians who evaluated six committees’ deliberations on 10 clinical cases. The study indicates that the clinicians found the clinical ethics consultations useful and worth while doing. However, a systematic approach to case consultations is vital. Procedures and mandate of the committees should (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Stella Reiter-Theil, Marcel Mertz, Jan Schürmann, Nicola Stingelin Giles & Barbara Meyer-Zehnder (2011). Evidence – Competence – Discourse: The Theoretical Framework of the Multi-Centre Clinical Ethics Support Project Metap. Bioethics 25 (7):403-412.score: 192.0
    In this paper we assume that ‘theory’ is important for Clinical Ethics Support Services (CESS). We will argue that the underlying implicit theory should be reflected. Moreover, we suggest that the theoretical components on which any clinical ethics support (CES) relies should be explicitly articulated in order to enhance the quality of CES.A theoretical framework appropriate for CES will be necessarily complex and should include ethical (both descriptive and normative), metaethical and organizational components. The various forms of CES (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Stella Reiter-Theil & George J. Agich (2008). Research on Clinical Ethics and Consultation. Introduction to the Theme. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):3-5.score: 192.0
    Clinical ethics consultation has developed from local pioneer projects into a field of growing interest among both clinicians and ethicists. What is needed are more systematic studies on the ethical challenges faced in clinical practice and problem solving through ethics consultation from interdisciplinary perspectives. The Thematic Issue covers a range of topics and includes five recent studies from various European countries and the USA, focusing on issues such as the ethical difficulties of end of life decisions, experiences with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Autumn M. Fiester (2014). Weaponizing Principles: Clinical Ethics Consultations & the Plight of the Morally Vulnerable. Bioethics 29 (1):n/a-n/a.score: 192.0
    Internationally, there is an on-going dialogue about how to professionalize ethics consultation services . Despite these efforts, one aspect of ECS-competence that has received scant attention is the liability of failing to adequately capture all of the relevant moral considerations in an ethics conflict. This failure carries a high price for the least powerful stakeholders in the dispute. When an ECS does not possess a sophisticated dexterity at translating what stakeholders say in a conflict into ethical concepts or principles, it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. George Howard (2010). Statistical Power, the Belmont Report, and the Ethics of Clinical Trials. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):675-691.score: 186.0
    Achieving a good clinical trial design increases the likelihood that a trial will take place as planned, including that data will be obtained from a sufficient number of participants, and the total number of participants will be the minimal required to gain the knowledge sought. A good trial design also increases the likelihood that the knowledge sought by the experiment will be forthcoming. Achieving such a design is more than good sense—it is ethically required in experiments when participants are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Sara Vollmer & George Howard (2010). Statistical Power, the Belmont Report, and the Ethics of Clinical Trials. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):675-691.score: 186.0
    Achieving a good clinical trial design increases the likelihood that a trial will take place as planned, including that data will be obtained from a sufficient number of participants, and the total number of participants will be the minimal required to gain the knowledge sought. A good trial design also increases the likelihood that the knowledge sought by the experiment will be forthcoming. Achieving such a design is more than good sense—it is ethically required in experiments when participants are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael H. Kottow (2007). Should Research Ethics Triumph Over Clinical Ethics? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):695-698.score: 186.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Marian Verkerk & Hilde Lindemann (2012). Toward a Naturalized Clinical Ethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (4):289-306.score: 186.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Roger Stanev (2012). Review of The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics, by D. Wendler, C. Grady, R. Crouch, R. Lie, F. Miller, and E. Emanuel. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):221-226.score: 180.0
    When is clinical research ethical? The difficulty in answering this question lies in the dual nature of research on human subjects, which yields two somewhat conflicting sets of obligations. On the one hand, there is the traditional view of science that includes the idea of an obligation to learn about the world. On the other hand, there is the obligation of care on the part of researchers towards individual participants in the research ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Christopher Leintz (2014). A Critical Analysis and Discussion of Clinical Research Ethics in the Russian Federation and Their Implications for Western Sponsored Trials. Bioethics 28 (5):263-268.score: 174.0
    Globalization, political upheavals, and Western economic struggles have caused a geographical reprioritization in the realm of drug development and human clinical research. Regulatory and cost hurdles as well as a saturation of research sites and subjects in Western countries have forced the pharmaceutical industry to place an unprecedented level of importance on emerging markets, injecting Western corporate initiatives into cultures historically and socially isolated from Western-centric value systems. One of the greatest recipients of this onslaught of Western business and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Kim Garchar (2012). Imperfection, Practice and Humility in Clinical Ethics. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1051-1056.score: 174.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Karen M. Meagher (2011). Considering Virtue: Public Health and Clinical Ethics. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):888-893.score: 174.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Inken Annegret Emrich, Leyla Fröhlich-Güzelsoy, Florian Bruns, Bernd Friedrich & Andreas Frewer (2014). Clinical Ethics and Patient Advocacy. HEC Forum 26 (2):111-124.score: 174.0
    In recent years, the rights of patients have assumed a more pivotal role in international discussion. Stricter laws on the protection of patients place greater priority on the perspective and the status of patients. The purpose of this study is to emphasize ethical aspects in communication, the role of patient advocates as contacts for the concerns and suggestions of patients, and how many problems of ethics disappear when communication is highlighted. We reviewed 680 documented cases of consultation in a 10-year (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Leah M. McClimans, Michael Dunn & Anne‐Marie Slowther (2011). Health Policy, Patient‐Centred Care and Clinical Ethics. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):913-919.score: 174.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jane Barrett (2006). Ethics in Clinical Research. Icr Pub..score: 170.0
    Chapter One: Introduction “The ethical basis of all [medical] research is that information gained from one patient's experience should, where feasible, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder (2002). Traversing Boundaries: Clinical Ethics, Moral Experience, and the Withdrawal of Life Supports. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (3):233-258.score: 170.0
    While many have suggested that to withdraw medical interventions is ethically equivalent to withholding them, the moral complexity of actually withdrawing life supportive interventions from a patient cannot be ignored. Utilizing interplay between expository and narrative styles, and drawing upon our experiences with patients, families, nurses, and physicians when life supports have been withdrawn, we explore the changeable character of boundaries in end-of-life situations. We consider ways in which boundaries imply differences – for example, between cognition and performance – and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. R. Forde & R. Pedersen (2012). Evaluation of Case Consultations in Clinical Ethics Committees. Clinical Ethics 7 (1):45-50.score: 168.0
    If ethics consultation services influence medical decisions it is important to evaluate how ethical dilemmas are dealt with by clinical ethics committees (CECs). Such evaluation is rare. This study presents a feasible and practical method of evaluating case discussions in CECs and the results emerging from the use of this method. A written presentation of an end-of-life dilemma was sent to all Norwegian ethics committees. The committees were asked to deal with the case as they would do if it (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) (2008). The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
    Comprehensive in scope and research, this book will be a crucial resource for researchers in the medical sciences, as well as teachers and students alike.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. V. Fournier, E. Rari, R. Forde, G. Neitzke, R. Pegoraro & A. J. Newson (2009). Clinical Ethics Consultation in Europe: A Comparative and Ethical Review of the Role of Patients. Clinical Ethics 4 (3):131-138.score: 168.0
    Clinical ethics has developed significantly in Europe over the past 15 years and remains an evolving process. While sharing our experiences in different European settings, we were surprised to discover marked differences in our practice, especially regarding the position and role of patients. In this paper, we describe these differences, such as patient access to and participation or representation in ethics consults. We propose reasons to explain these differences, hypothesizing that they relate to the historic and sociocultural context of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. R. Forde & T. W. R. Hansen (2009). Involving Patients and Relatives in a Norwegian Clinical Ethics Committee: What Have We Learned? Clinical Ethics 4 (3):125-130.score: 168.0
    To date, few Norwegian clinical ethics committees (CECs) have included patients or next of kin in case discussions. In 2008, Rikshospitalet's (The National Hospital's) CEC began to routinely invite patients and relatives into case discussions. In this paper, we describe seven cases discussed by this committee in 2008. Six involved life and death decision-making in collaboration with the next of kin, while one related case did not include relatives. In our opinion, representing the patient's perspective was advantageous to the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Laura Williamson (2007). Empirical Assessments of Clinical Ethics Services: Implications for Clinical Ethics Committees. Clinical Ethics 2 (4):187-192.score: 168.0
    The need to evaluate the performance of clinical ethics services is widely acknowledged although work in this area is more developed in the United States. In the USA many studies that assess clinical ethics services have utilized empirical methods and assessment criteria. The value of these approaches is thought to rest on their ability to measure the value of services in a demonstrable fashion. However, empirical measures tend to lack ethical content, making their contribution to developments in ethical (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Malcolm Parker (2009). Experiments in Clinical Ethics: Review Essay. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (4):323-333.score: 168.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. R. Pedersen, S. A. Hurst, J. Schildmann, S. Schuster & B. Molewijk (2010). The Development of a Descriptive Evaluation Tool for Clinical Ethics Case Consultations. Clinical Ethics 5 (3):136-141.score: 168.0
    There is growing interest in clinical ethics. However, we still have sparse knowledge about what is actually going on in the everyday practice of clinical ethics consultations. This paper introduces a descriptive evaluation tool to present, discuss and compare how clinical ethics case consultations are actually carried out. The tool does not aim to define ‘best practice’. Rather, it facilitates concrete comparisons and evaluative discussions of the role, function, procedures and ideals inherent in clinical ethics case (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. M. Dunn (2011). Discourses of Disability and Clinical Ethics Support. Clinical Ethics 6 (1):32-38.score: 168.0
    It is now broadly accepted that disability is a concept infused with both descriptive and evaluative meaning, such that invoking the concept of disability necessarily involves making judgements of moral value as well as describing certain facts about individuals. This paper aims to map the complex terrain that shapes our current understandings of disability by outlining five distinct ‘discourses of disability’. It is shown how the similarities and differences between the discourses hinge on different ways of making sense of the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. G. Neitzke (2009). Patient Involvement in Clinical Ethics Services: From Access to Participation and Membership. Clinical Ethics 4 (3):146-151.score: 168.0
    Ethics consultation is a novel paradigm in European health-care institutions. In this paper, patient involvement in all clinical ethics activities is scrutinized. It is argued that patients should have access to case consultation services via clearly defined access paths. However, the right of both health-care professionals and patients indicates that patients should not always be notified of a consultation. Ethics education, another well-established function of an ethics committee, should equally be available for patients, lay people and hospital staff. Beyond (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Anneke Lucassen & Michael Parker (2006). The UK Genethics Club: Clinical Ethics Support for Genetic Services. Clinical Ethics 1 (4):219-223.score: 168.0
    The UK Genethics Club was established in November 2001 in order to provide a national forum of ethics support for the profession of clinical genetics in the UK. The forum brings together health professionals, medical ethicists and lawyers and support is provided through detailed discussion of cases and sharing of good practice. Clinical genetics professionals had previously voiced concerns about making extremely difficult ethical decisions, with profound implications, in something of a vacuum. Professionals saw a lack of guidance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. G. Hunt, C. Gannon & A. Gallagher (2012). Elements of an Engaged Clinical Ethics: A Qualitative Analysis of Hospice Clinical Ethics Committee Discussions. Clinical Ethics 7 (4):175-182.score: 168.0
    Social, legal and health-care changes have created an increasing need for ethical review within end-of-life care. Multiprofessional clinical ethics committees (CECs) are increasingly supporting decision-making in hospitals and hospices. This paper reports findings from an analysis of formal summaries from CEC meetings, of one UK hospice, spanning four years. Using qualitative content analysis, five themes were identified: timeliness of decision-making, holistic care, contextual openness, values diversity and consensual understanding. The elements of an engaged clinical ethics in a hospice (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000