Search results for 'Ethics, Comparative' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sumner B. Twiss & Bruce Grelle (eds.) (2000). Explorations in Global Ethics: Comparative Religious Ethics and Interreligious Dialogue. Westview Press.score: 87.0
    This volume for the first time brings the scholarly discipline of comparative religious ethics into constructive collaboration with the community of interreligious dialogue. Its design is premised on two important insights. First, interreligious dialogue offers to comparative religious ethics a new, more persuasive rationale, agenda of issues, and practical orientation. Second, comparative religious ethics offers to interreligious dialogue an arsenal of critical tools and methods which will enhance the sophistication of its practical work. In this way, both (...)
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  2. Aaron Stalnaker (2005). Comparative Religious Ethics and the Problem of “Human Nature”. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):187-224.score: 75.0
    Comparative religious ethics is a complicated scholarly endeavor, striving to harmonize intellectual goals that are frequently conceived as quite different, or even intrinsically opposed. Against commonly voiced suspicions of comparative work, this essay argues that descriptive, comparative, and normative interests may support rather than conflict with each other, depending on the comparison in question, and how it is pursued. On the basis of a brief comparison of the early Christian Augustine of Hippo and the early Confucians Mencius (...)
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  3. Sumner B. Twiss (2005). Comparative Ethics, a Common Morality, and Human Rights. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):649-657.score: 75.0
    This essay is a brief attempt to summarize and evaluate the contributions that "Democracy and Tradition" makes to the field of comparative ethics. It is argued that the potential impact of these contributions would be strengthened by engagement with the common morality already imbedded in international human rights norms.
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  4. Roderick Hindery (2008). Comparative Ethics, Ideologies, and Critical Thought. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):215-231.score: 75.0
    After the publication of my book and various articles about comparative religious ethics, obstacles in the field's further development seemed to mount as swiftly as practical issues seemed to trumpet the need for global ethics more loudly. Driven by impatience, I wondered if I were fiddling in unending discussion while the planet burned. As others persevered and evolved productively in addressing developmental issues in the field directly, I began to work through the lens of a less direct, but complementary, (...)
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  5. Kevin Schilbrack (2002). Teaching Comparative Religious Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (2):295 - 312.score: 75.0
    Though others have surveyed the different methods in comparative religious ethics, relatively little attention has been given to different approaches to pedagogy (exceptions include Lovin and Reynolds; Juergensmeyer; Twiss). The field of comparative religious ethics has now reached a level of maturity so that there are a variety of ways such courses can be taught. In this review I consider the approaches to comparative religious ethics found in four recent texts by Jacob Neusner, Darrell Fasching and Dell (...)
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  6. Elizabeth M. Bucar, Grace Y. Kao & Irene Oh (2010). Sexing Comparative Ethics: Bringing Forth Feminist and Gendered Perspectives. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):654-659.score: 75.0
    This collaborative companion piece, written as a postscript to the three preceding essays, highlights four themes in comparative religious ethics that emerge through our focus on sex and gender: language, embodiment, justice, and critique.
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  7. Timothy P. Jackson (1999). Naturalism, Formalism, and Supernaturalism: Moral Epistemology and Comparative Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):477 - 506.score: 75.0
    If the much discussed fragmentation of the West means that we can seldom hold constructive moral conversations with our near neighbors, why imagine that comparative ethics is feasible as a critical enterprise with a coherent method? How, more specifically, do we understand the relative merits of naturalism, formalism, and supernaturalism as ethical orientations? The author addresses these questions first by examining the meaning of the quoted terms, then by criticizing the inordinate optimism of most naturalisms and formalisms. The article (...)
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  8. John Kelsay (2010). Response to Papers for “Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics” Focus. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):485-493.score: 75.0
    The Center for the Study of World Religions (CSWR) project represented here through papers by Thomas Lewis, Aaron Stalnaker, Hans Lucht, and Lee Yearley (with responses) was motivated by the judgment that the trend toward a focus on virtue ethics, with attendant concern for techniques of forming selves, creates an opportunity for a dialogue with ethnographers. I argue that the CSWR essays neglect social and institutional considerations, as well as overdrawing the distinction between “formalist” and virtue approaches to the study (...)
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  9. John Kelsay (2012). The Present State of the Comparative Study of Religious Ethics: An Update. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):583-602.score: 75.0
    A survey of developments over the last forty years suggests that little progress has been made in the development of comparative religious ethics as a discipline. While authors working in this field have produced a number of interesting works, the field lacks structure, including an agreement on the basic purpose, terms, and approaches by which contributions may be evaluated as better or worse. I provide an account of this history, suggesting that a way forward will involve marrying ethicists' interest (...)
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  10. Elizabeth M. Bucar & Aaron Stalnaker (2014). On Comparative Religious Ethics as a Field of Study. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):358-384.score: 75.0
    This essay is a critical engagement with recent assessments of comparative religious ethics by John Kelsay and Jung Lee. Contra Kelsay's proposal to return to a neo-Weberian sociology of religious norm elaboration and justification, the authors argue that comparative religious ethics is and should be practiced as a field of study in active conversation with other fields that consider human flourishing, employing a variety of methods that have their roots in multiple disciplines. Cross-pollination from a variety of disciplines (...)
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  11. John Braisted Carman, Mark Juergensmeyer & William Darrow (eds.) (1991). A Bibliographic Guide to the Comparative Study of Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 69.0
    This bibliography is the culmination of four years' work by a team of noted scholars; its annotated entries are organized by religious tradition and cover each tradition's central concepts, offering a judicious selection of primary and secondary works as well as recommendations of cross-cultural topics to be explored. Specialists in the history and literature of religions and comparative religion will find this bibliography a valuable research tool.
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  12. Jonathan Wyn Schofer (2005). Self, Subject, and Chosen Subjection Rabbinic Ethics and Comparative Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):255-291.score: 69.0
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  13. Munyaradzi Felix Murove (ed.) (2009). African Ethics: An Anthology of Comparative and Applied Ethics. University of Kwazulu-Natal Press.score: 69.0
    African ethics in the world -- The primacy of ubuntu in African ethics -- African ethics and Christianity -- African bioethics -- African business ethics -- African ethics and the environment -- African ethics and political transformation.
     
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  14. Robert B. Zeuschner (2000). Classical Ethics, East and West: Ethics From a Comparative Perspective. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 67.0
    This text combines discussions of major classical Western philosophical ethical systems (primarily Greek and Judeo-Christian) and, in equal depth, discussions of three non-Western ethical traditions (Indian Buddhist, Chinese Confucian, and Chinese Taoist) in a multi-cultural historical framework.
     
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  15. Irene Oh (2008). Approaching Islam: Comparative Ethics Through Human Rights. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):405-423.score: 66.0
    A dialogical approach to understanding Islamic ethics rejects objectivist methods in favor of a conversational model in which participants accept each other as rational moral agents. Hans-Georg Gadamer asserts the importance of agreement upon a subject matter through conversation as a means to gaining insight into other persons and cultures, and Jürgen Habermas stresses the importance of fairness in dialogue. Using human rights as a subject matter for engaging in dialogue with Islamic scholars, Muslim perspectives on issues such as democracy, (...)
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  16. Roderick Hindery (1978). Comparative Ethics in Hindu and Buddhist Traditions. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 66.0
    The book contains elaborate notes, two appendices, critical textual matter, a diagram of topical parallels, a bibliography, and an index.
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  17. Ok-Sun An (1997). Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics. Peter Lang.score: 66.0
  18. John Kelsay (2005). Democratic Virtue, Comparative Ethics, and Contemporary Islam. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):697-707.score: 63.0
    This essay illustrates the kind of moral analysis Jeffrey Stout advocates in "Democracy and Tradition" by way of examining a conversation among Muslims that took place between June and December 2002. Their debate centers on al-Qaìda's legitimacy as God's chosen defender of Islam, which is called into question due to the tension between al-Qaìda's military tactics and the concepts of honorable combat held within the Islamic tradition. This giving and taking of reasons in both defense and detraction of al-Qaìda's tactics (...)
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  19. William A. Barbieri Jr (2002). The Heterological Quest: Michel de Certeau's Travel Narratives and the "Other" of Comparative Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (1):23-48.score: 63.0
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  20. Rafik I. Beekun, Yvonne Stedham & Jeanne H. Yamamura (2003). Business Ethics in Brazil and the U.S.: A Comparative Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 42 (3):267 - 279.score: 57.0
    In this comparative survey of 126 Brazilian and U.S. business professionals, we explore the effect of national culture on ethical decision-making within the context of business. Using Reidenbach and Robin''s (1988) multi-criteria ethics instrument, we examined how these two countries'' differences on Hofstede''s individualism/collectivism dimension are related to the manner in which business practitioners make ethical decisions. Our results indicate that Brazilians and Americans evaluate the ethical content of actions or decisions differently when applying utilitarian criteria. By contrast, business (...)
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  21. Mark T. Unno (1999). Questions in the Making: A Review Essay on Zen Buddhist Ethics in the Context of Buddhist and Comparative Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):507 - 536.score: 57.0
    In reviewing four works from the 1990s-monographs by Christopher Ives and Phillip Olson on Zen Buddhist ethics, Damien Keown's treatment of Indian Buddhist ethics, and an edited collection on Buddhism and human rights-this article examines recent scholarship on Zen Buddhist ethics in light of issues in Buddhist and comparative ethics. It highlights selected themes in the notional and real encounter of Zen Buddhism with Western thought and culture as presented in the reviewed works and identifies issues and problems for (...)
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  22. Gedeon Josua Rossouw (2011). A Global Comparative Analysis of the Global Survey of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (S1):93-101.score: 57.0
    This article concludes this special issue of the Journal of Business Ethics that focussed on the Global Survey of Business Ethics as field of Training, Teaching and Research. The article provides a comparative global analysis of the findings in the eight world regions that participated in this global survey viz. Central Asia, East Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America, Oceania, South and South-East Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. The eight regions are compared with regard to their findings on the terminology (...)
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  23. Aaron Stalnaker (2008). Judging Others: History, Ethics, and the Purposes of Comparison. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):425-444.score: 54.0
    The most interesting and perilous issue at present in comparative religious ethics is comparative ethical judgment—when and how to judge others, if at all. There are understandable historical and conceptual reasons for the current tendency to prefer descriptive over normative work in comparative religious ethics. However, judging those we study is inescapable—it can be suppressed or marginalized but not eliminated. Therefore, the real question is how to judge others (and ourselves) well, not whether to judge. Instead of (...)
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  24. Randi L. Sims & A. Ercan Gegez (2004). Attitudes Towards Business Ethics: A Five Nation Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (3):253-265.score: 51.0
    Increasingly the business environment is tending toward a global economy. The current study compares the results of the Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Questionnaire (ATBEQ) reported in the literature for samples from the United States of America, Israel, Western Australia, and South Africa to a new sample (n = 125) from Turkey. The results indicate that while there are some shared views towards business ethics across countries, significant differences do exist between Turkey and each of the other countries in the study. (...)
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  25. David Hollenbach (2010). Book Discussion Section: Comparative Ethics, Islam, and Human Rights: Internal Pluralism and the Possible Development of Tradition. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):580-587.score: 51.0
    Dialogue with three major Muslim authors shows that Islam can take a positive stance toward human rights while also presenting differing interpretations of the meaning and scope of rights. Because of their subordination of norms reached through reason to those drawn from faith, as well as negative experiences of the impact of Western colonization of parts of the Muslim world, Abul A‘la Maududi and Sayyid Qutb place significant restrictions on rights of conscience. 'Abdolkarim Soroush's positive support for the role of (...)
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  26. Mark S. Blodgett, Colette Dumas & Alberto Zanzi (2011). Emerging Trends in Global Ethics: A Comparative Study of U.S. And International Family Business Values. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):29-38.score: 51.0
    Although family business comprises the majority of global business, it is significantly under-researched. Yet it is considered to have unique ethical values compared to non-family corporations. This is attributable to its family orientation. Therefore, it is worthwhile to identify and define dominant family business ethics values. The authors compare a sample of the U.S. family business, U.S. corporate entities, and international family business mission statements for frequency of ethics values. The data reveals three primary findings: (1) generally, the U.S. family (...)
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  27. Thomas A. Lewis (2010). Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics: Or Ethnography and the Comparative Religious Ethics Local. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):395-403.score: 51.0
    Recent ethnographic studies of lived ethics, such as those of Leela Prasad and Saba Mahmood, present valuable opportunities for comparative religious ethics. This essay argues that developments in philosophical and religious ethics over the last three decades have supported a strong interest in thick descriptions of what it means to be human. This anthropological turn has thereby laid important groundwork for the encounter between these scholars and new ethnographic studies. Nonetheless, an encounter it is. Each side brings novel questions (...)
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  28. Y. Ilker Topcu (2010). Have Ethical Perceptions Changed? A Comparative Study on the Ethical Perceptions of Turkish Faculty Members. Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):137-151.score: 51.0
    This study presents a comparative investigation of ethical perceptions of the faculty members, working in selected departments of Turkish universities. A descriptive research design is used in order to reveal the perceptions regarding the ethical dilemmas related to instruction, research, and outside employment activities in both 2003 and 2008. The set of activities that are considered unethical by faculty members, as well as the occurrence of potential ethical dilemmas are identified on a comparative basis. According to the findings (...)
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  29. Reyes Calderón-Cuadrado, José Luis Álvarez-Arce, Isabel Rodríguez-Tejedo & Stella Salvatierra (2009). “Ethics Hotlines” in Transnational Companies: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):199 - 210.score: 51.0
    This empirical study explores the characteristics and degree of implementation of so-called ethics hotlines in transnational companies (TNCs), which allow employees to present allegations of wrongdoing and ethical dilemmas, as well as to report concerns. Ethics hotlines have not received much attention in literature; therefore, this paper aims to fill that gap. Through the analysis of conduct/ethics codes and the compliance programs of the top 150 transnational companies ranked by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) ( 2007 (...)
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  30. G. Scott Davis (2008). Two Neglected Classics of Comparative Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):375-403.score: 51.0
    Mary Douglas's Purity and Danger and Herbert Fingarette's Confucius: The Secular as Sacred have had a continuous impact on cultural anthropology and the study of ancient Chinese thought, respectively, but neither has typically been read as a contribution to comparative religious ethics. This paper argues that both books developed from profound dissatisfaction with the empiricist presuppositions that dominated their fields into the 1970s and that both should be associated with the revival of American pragmatism that is currently driving a (...)
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  31. Jeffrey Stout (1983). Holism and Comparative Ethics: A Response to Little. Journal of Religious Ethics 11 (2):301 - 316.score: 51.0
    This paper responds to David Little's recent discussion of the author's "holistic" criticisms of "Comparative Religious Ethics" (Little and Twiss, 1978). In two crucial areas, Little seems to have moved beyond his original position: first, in granting that the relation among the levels of the structure of practical justification is interactive; and second, in making explicit his conception of the point of pursuing comparative studies. Both developments are welcome, but they raise doubts about whether much (...)
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  32. James Turner Johnson (1997). Moral Traditions and Religious Ethics: A Comparative Enquiry. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (3):77 - 101.score: 51.0
    This essay explores the convergence of theoretical or foundational, historical, and comparative concerns in religious ethics through the examination of two religiously informed traditions on statecraft, that shaped by Augustine's idea of the civitas dei and that shaped by classical Islamic juristic thought on the dar alislam. Three issues are examined for each tradition: the concept of normative political order, the nature of justified use of force, and the implications of their rival claims to universality. The essay shows how (...)
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  33. Francisca Cho (1998). Leaping Into the Boundless: A Daoist Reading of Comparative Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):139 - 165.score: 51.0
    This essay seeks to step beyond the argument between ethical formalism and ethical naturalism concerning the nature of moral reason and to step outside the universalism versus relativism debate in cross-cultural studies. Its thesis is that both formalism (the work of Ronald Green) and naturalism (the work of Frank Reynolds and Robin Lovin) advance versions of moral reason that are functionaries of intellectual discussions that make sense of behavior and that such discussion should not be confused with the ostensible object (...)
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  34. John Kelsay (1996). Review: Plurality, Pluralism, and Comparative Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (2):403 - 428.score: 51.0
    Recent discussions of religious, cultural, and/or moral diversity raise questions relevant to the descriptive and normative aims of students of religious ethics. In conversation with several illustrative works, the author takes up (1) issues of terminology, (2) explanations or classifications of types and origins of plurality and pluralism, (3) the relations between pluralism as a normative theory and the aims of a liberal state, and (4) the import of an emphasis on plurality or pluralism for the comparative study of (...)
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  35. E. Lamas, M. Ferrer, A. Molina, R. Salinas, A. Hevia, A. Bota, D. Feinholz, M. Fuchs, R. Schramm, J. -C. Tealdi & S. Zorrilla (2010). A Comparative Analysis of Biomedical Research Ethics Regulation Systems in Europe and Latin America with Regard to the Protection of Human Subjects. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):750-753.score: 51.0
    The European project European and Latin American Systems of Ethics Regulation of Biomedical Research Project (EULABOR) has carried out the first comparative analysis of ethics regulation systems for biomedical research in seven countries in Europe and Latin America, evaluating their roles in the protection of human subjects. We developed a conceptual and methodological framework defining ‘ethics regulation system for biomedical research’ as a set of actors, institutions, codes and laws involved in overseeing the ethics of biomedical research on humans. (...)
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  36. Jamal A. Al-Khatib, Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas & Scott J. Vitell (2004). Organizational Ethics in Developing Countries: A Comparative Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):309 - 322.score: 51.0
    Relationships with one's employees, co-workers, or superiors create ethical dilemmas. Employees' judgments and ethical perceptions have been extensively studied in Western cultures, but not in developing countries. The purpose of this investigation is to examine employees' self-reported work-related ethics and compare them to their perceptions of co-workers' and top managements' along various morally challenging situations in three developing countries' organizations. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Oman, known as the Gulf countries, were selected as the research setting - and provided the sampling (...)
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  37. Suk Shin Kim (forthcoming). The Mini-Cup Jelly Court Cases: A Comparative Analysis From a Food Ethics Perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-14.score: 51.0
    This study compares and analyzes separate court rulings in three countries on “mini-cup jelly” (a firm jelly containing konjac and packaged in bite-sized plastic cups) from a food ethics perspective. While the Korean and US courts decided that the mini-cup jelly was defective, and that the manufacturers or importers were liable for damages in these cases, the Japanese court took an opposing stance in favor of the manufacturer. However, from an absolute and fundamental viewpoint, the jelly was unacceptable, ethically as (...)
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  38. John Kelsay (1993). Islam and War: A Study in Comparative Ethics. Westminster/John Knox Press.score: 50.0
    This book explores these questions and addresses the lack of comparative perspectives on the ethics of war, particularly with respect to Islam.
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  39. Torkel Brekke (ed.) (2006). The Ethics of War in Asian Civilizations: A Comparative Perspective. Routledge.score: 50.0
    This study of the comparative ethics of war seeks to open a discussion about whether there are universal standards in the ideologies of warfare between the major religious traditions of the world. The project looks at the ideology of war in the major Asian religious traditions. Does our exploration of the ethics of war in Asian civilizations have any bearing on the pressing questions of armed conflict today? It has become clear that Islamic ethics and law contain sophisticated concepts (...)
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  40. Jaroslav Pelikan (1985). Comparative Work Ethics: Judeo-Christian, Islamic, and Eastern. Library of Congress.score: 50.0
  41. Bjorn Fasterling (2009). The Managerial Law Firm and the Globalization of Legal Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):21 - 34.score: 48.0
    The processes of economic integration induced by globalization have brought about a certain type of legal practice that challenges the core values of legal ethics. Law firms seeking to represent the interests of internationally active corporate clients must embrace and systematically apply concepts of strategic management and planning and install corporate business structures to sustain competition for lucrative clients. These measures bear a high conflict potential with the core values of legal ethics. However, we observe in parallel a global consolidation (...)
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  42. Gary Lee Downey, Juan C. Lucena & Carl Mitcham (2007). Engineering Ethics and Identity: Emerging Initiatives in Comparative Perspective. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):463-487.score: 48.0
    This article describes and accounts for variable interests in engineering ethics in France, Germany, and Japan by locating recent initiatives in relation to the evolving identities of engineers. A key issue in ethics education for engineers concerns the relationship between the identity of the engineer and the responsibilities of engineering work. This relationship has varied significantly over time and from place to place around the world. One methodological strategy for sorting out similarities and differences in engineers’ identities is to ask (...)
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  43. Wen-Jiuh Chiang, Chihchia Chen, ChiaChien Teng & Jiangjun Gu (2008). A Comparative Study on the Information Ethics of Junior High School Students Cognition and Behavior Between Taiwan and China: Kaohsiung and Nanjing Regions Used as Examples. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):121-138.score: 48.0
    A great deal of progress has been made on information ethics. Which portion is not sufficient? That might be the comparison from countries to countries. The purpose of this study was closely examined using the cross-cultural method for comparison. To determine the ethics cognitions and behaviors of the students, a comprehensive survey was distributed. The questionnaire for the study used Mason’s four essential factors in information ethics that included Privacy, Accuracy, Property and Accessibility (PAPA). The samples were comprised of Kaohsiung (...)
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  44. Robert W. McGee, Simon S. M. Ho & Annie Y. S. Li (2008). A Comparative Study on Perceived Ethics of Tax Evasion: Hong Kong Vs the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):147 - 158.score: 48.0
    This article begins with a review of the literature on the ethics of tax evasion and identifies the three main views that have emerged over the centuries, namely always ethical, sometimes ethical, and never or almost never ethical. It then reports on the results of a survey of HK and U.S. university business students who were asked to express their opinions on the 15 statements covering the three main views. The data are then analyzed to determine which of the three (...)
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  45. Justin Tan & Irene Hau-Siu Chow (2009). Isolating Cultural and National Influence on Value and Ethics: A Test of Competing Hypotheses. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):197 - 210.score: 48.0
    We live in an increasingly globalizing world, in which countries are closely linked by international trade and investment ties. Cross-cultural comparative studies of national values and ethics have attracted growing research interest in recent years, because shared practices, values and ethical standards depend on shared beliefs. However, the findings of such studies have been unable to reach a consensus on the impact of culture on ethics-related attitudes and behavior. Empirically, many "cross–cultural" differences reported by previous studies might actually stem (...)
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  46. Elizabeth M. Bucar (2010). Bodies at the Margins: The Case of Transsexuality in Catholic and Shia Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):601-615.score: 48.0
    This essay explores the ways in which emerging religious understandings of sexual reassignment surgery (SRS) have potential for new work in comparative ethics. I focus on the startling diversity of teachings on transsexuality among the Vatican and leading Shia clerics in Iran. While the Vatican rejects SRS as a cure for transsexuality, Iranian clerics not only support decisions to transition to a new sex, they see it as necessary in some cases given the gendered nature of the moral life. (...)
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  47. Geoffrey Ashton (2014). Role Ethics or Ethics of Role-Play? A Comparative Critical Analysis of the Ethics of Confucianism and the Bhagavad Gītā. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (1):1-21.score: 48.0
    Both Confucianism and the Bhagavad Gītā emphasize the moral authority of social roles. But how deep does the likeness between these ethical philosophies run? In this essay I focus upon two significant points of comparison between the role-based ethics of Confucianism and the Gītā: (1) the interrelation between formalized social roles and family feeling, and (2) the religious dimension of moral action. How is it that Confucians ground their social roles in family feeling, while the Gītā emphasizes rupture between role (...)
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  48. Richard B. Miller (2005). On Making a Cultural Turn in Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):409-443.score: 48.0
    This essay critically explores resources and reasons for the study of culture in religious ethics, paying special attention to rhetorics and genres that provide an ethics of ordinary life. I begin by exploring a work in cultural anthropology that poses important questions for comparative and cultural inquiry in an age alert to "otherness," asymmetries of power, the end of value-neutrality in the humanities, and the formation of identity. I deepen my argument by making a foundational case for the importance (...)
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  49. Chad Hansen (2004). The Normative Impact of Comparative Ethics: Human Rights. In Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge. 72--99.score: 48.0
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