Search results for 'Ethics, Medical' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  62
    P. Riis (1993). Medical Ethics in the European Community. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):7-12.
    Increasing European co-operation must take place in many areas, including medical ethics. Against the background of common cultural norms and pluralistic variation within political traditions, religion and lifestyles, Europe will have to converge towards unity within the field of medical ethics. This article examines how such convergence might develop with respect to four major areas: European research ethics committees, democratic health systems, the human genome project and rules for stopping futile treatments.
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  2.  16
    A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is essential. (...)
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  3.  15
    M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics is a (...)
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  4.  60
    M. Parker (1995). Autonomy, Problem-Based Learning, and the Teaching of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):305-310.
    Autonomy has been the central principle underpinning changes which have affected the practice of medicine in recent years. Medical education is undergoing changes as well, many of which are underpinned, at least implicitly, by increasing concern for autonomy. Some universities have embarked on graduate courses which utilize problem-based learning (PBL) techniques to teach all areas, including medical ethics. I argue that PBL is a desirable method for teaching and learning in medical ethics. It is desirable because the (...)
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  5. Allison Merrick, Rochelle Green, Thomas V. Cunningham, Leah R. Eisenberg & D. Micah Hester (2016). Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):141-149.
    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students’ ethical reasoning. This paper discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical students that we have devised, (...)
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  6.  3
    Kathryn M. Weston, Judy R. Mullan, Wendy Hu, Colin Thomson, Warren C. Rich, Patricia Knight-Billington, Brahmaputra Marjadi & Peter L. McLennan (2016). Academic Guidance in Medical Student Research: How Well Do Supervisors and Students Understand the Ethics of Human Research? Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (2):87-102.
    Research is increasingly recognised as a key component of medical curricula, offering a range of benefits including development of skills in evidence-based medicine. The literature indicates that experienced academic supervision or mentoring is important in any research activity and positively influences research output. The aim of this project was to investigate the human research ethics experiences and knowledge of three groups: medical students, and university academic staff and clinicians eligible to supervise medical student research projects; at two (...)
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  7.  13
    Donna Dickenson, Richard Huxtable & Michael Parker (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook. Cambridge University Press.
    This new edition of The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook builds on the success of the first edition by working from the 'bottom up', with a widely praised case ...
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  8.  40
    Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service medicine (...)
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  9.  24
    Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.) (2008). Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press.
    Muslim Medical Ethics draws on the work of historians, health-care professionals, theologians, and social scientists to produce an interdisciplinary view of ...
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  10.  18
    Ezekiel J. Emanuel (1991). The Ends of Human Life: Medical Ethics in a Liberal Polity. Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION The Questions of Medical Ethics Call him Andrew. His face is gaunt and unshaven but peaceful. His eyelids are gently closed. ...
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  11. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship between medical (...)
     
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  12.  10
    T. Hope (1999). Empirical Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):219-220.
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  13. Robert M. Veatch (2005). Disrupted Dialogue: Medical Ethics and the Collapse of Physician-Humanist Communication (1770-1980). Oxford University Press.
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both fields were (...)
     
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  14. Alastair V. Campbell (ed.) (1997). Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book is intended as a practical introduction to the ethical problems which doctors and other health professionals can expect to encounter in their practice. It is divided into three parts: ethical foundations, clinical ethics, and medicine and society. The authors incorporate new chapters on topics such as theories of medical ethics, cultural aspects of medicine, genetic dilemmas, aging, dementia and mortality, research ethics, justice and health care (including an examination of resource allocation), and medicine, ethics and medical (...)
     
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  15.  19
    Thomas Stephen Szasz (1977/1988). The Theology of Medicine: The Political-Philosophical Foundations of Medical Ethics. Syracuse University Press.
    The essays assembled in this volume reflect my long-standing interest in moral philosophy and my conviction that the idea of a medical ethics as something ...
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  16.  4
    S. A. Goldman & J. Arbuthnot (1979). Teaching Medical Ethics: The Cognitive-Developmental Approach. Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (4):170-181.
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  17. Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.) (2005). Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This collection brings together original essays demonstrating the cutting edge of philosophical research in medical ethics. With contributions from a range of established and up-and-coming authors, it examines topics at the forefront of medical technology, such as ethical issues raised by developments in how we research stem cells and genetic engineering, as well as new questions raised by methodological changes in how we approach medical ethics.
     
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  18.  71
    Judith Andre (1999). The Alleged Incompatibility of Business and Medical Ethics. HEC Forum 11 (4):288-292.
    Business Ethics and medical ethics are in principle compatible: In particular, the tools of business ethics can be useful to those doing healthcare ethics. Health care could be conducted as a business and maintain its moral core.
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  19.  34
    Susan D. McCammon & Howard Brody (2012). How Virtue Ethics Informs Medical Professionalism. HEC Forum 24 (4):257-272.
    We argue that a turn toward virtue ethics as a way of understanding medical professionalism represents both a valuable corrective and a missed opportunity. We look at three ways in which a closer appeal to virtue ethics could help address current problems or issues in professionalism education—first, balancing professionalism training with demands for professional virtues as a prerequisite; second, preventing demands for the demonstrable achievement of competencies from working against ideal professionalism education as lifelong learning; and third, avoiding temptations (...)
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  20.  45
    Trevor Smith (1999). Ethics in Medical Research: A Handbook of Good Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a comprehensive and practical guide to the ethical issues raised by different kinds of medical research, and is the first such book to be written with the needs of the researcher in mind. Clearly structured and written in a plain and accessible style, the book covers every significant ethical issue likely to be faced by researchers and research ethics committees. The author outlines and clarifies official guidelines, gives practical advice on how to adhere to these, and suggests (...)
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  21. Edmond A. Murphy (1997). Underpinnings of Medical Ethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Thus far in the development of the discipline of medical ethics, the overriding concern has been with solutions to specific problems. But discussion is hampered by lack of understanding of the scope and methodology of medical ethics, and its scientific and philosophical basis. In Underpinnings of Medical Ethics Edmond A. Murphy, James J. Butzow, and Edward L. Suarez-Murias offer much-needed clarification of the purview, ontological basis, and methodology of a medical ethics that is to be comprehensive (...)
     
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  22.  9
    Giovanni Maio (1999). Is Etiquette Relevant to Medical Ethics? Ethics and Aesthetics in the Works of John Gregory (1724–1773). Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):181-187.
    The writings of the Scottish physician and philosopher John Gregory play an important role in the modern codification of medical ethics. It is therefore appropriate to use his work as a historical example in approaching the question how elements of aesthetics were incorporated in 18th century medical ethics. The concept of a Gentleman is pivotal to the entire medical ethics of John Gregory as it provides him with the ethical source of the duty to patients. Gregory makes (...)
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  23.  10
    N. Zurak, D. Derezic & G. Pavlekovic (1999). Students' Opinions on the Medical Ethics Course in the Medical School Curriculum. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):61-62.
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  24.  21
    Steven H. Miles (2013). The New Military Medical Ethics: Legacies of the Gulf Wars and the War on Terror. Bioethics 27 (3):117-123.
    United States military medical ethics evolved during its involvement in two recent wars, Gulf War I (1990–1991) and the War on Terror (2001–). Norms of conduct for military clinicians with regard to the treatment of prisoners of war and the administration of non-therapeutic bioactive agents to soldiers were set aside because of the sense of being in a ‘new kind of war’. Concurrently, the use of radioactive metal in weaponry and the ability to measure the health consequences of trade (...)
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  25.  54
    Ian Kennedy (1988). Treat Me Right: Essays in Medical Law and Ethics. Clarendon Press.
    Controversial and amusing, this collection of Kennedy's writings illuminates the rights, duties, and liabilities of doctors as well as other aspects of medical law and ethics.
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  26.  3
    C. Blomquist (1975). The Teaching of Medical Ethics in Sweden. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):96-103.
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  27.  6
    R. M. Veatch & D. Fenner (1975). The Teaching of Medical Ethics in the United States of America. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):99-103.
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  28.  15
    Michael H. Kottow (1999). Theoretical Aids in Teaching Medical Ethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):225-229.
    Medical ethics could be better understood if some basic theoretical aspects of practices in health care are analysed. By discussing the underlying ethical principles that govern medical practice, the student should also become familiar with the notion that medical ethics is much more than the external application of socially accepted moral standards. Professions in general and medicine in particular have internal values that command their moral virtuosity at the same time as their technical excellence. Three examples where (...)
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  29.  5
    D. Ojanuga (1993). The Medical Ethics of the 'Father of Gynaecology', Dr J Marion Sims. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):28-31.
    Vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) was a common ailment among American women in the 19th century. Prior to that time, no successful surgery had been developed for the cure of this condition until Dr J Marion Sims perfected a successful surgical technique in 1849. Dr Sims used female slaves as research subjects over a four-year period of experimentation (1845-1849). This paper discusses the controversy surrounding his use of powerless women and whether his actions were acceptable during that historical period.
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  30.  9
    Akira Akabayashi, Brian Taylor Slingsby, Noriko Nagao, Ichiro Kai & Hajime Sato (2008). A Five Year Follow-Up National Study of Ethics Committees in Medical Organizations in Japan. HEC Forum 20 (1):49-60.
    Compared to institutional and area-based ethics committees, little is known about the structure and activities performed by ethics committees at national medical organizations and societies. This five year follow-up study aimed to determine (1) the creation and function of ethics committees at medical organizations in Japan, and (2) their general strategies to deal with ethical problems. The study sample included the member societies of the Japanese Association of Medical Sciences (n=92 in 1998, n=96 in 2003). Instruments consisted (...)
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  31.  1
    R. V. Short (1975). Focus: Current Issues in Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):56-58.
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  32.  3
    Terrence F. Ackerman (1989). A Casebook of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Should a brain-dead woman be artificially maintained for the sake of her fetus? Does a physician have the right to administer a life-saving transfusion despite the patient's religious beliefs? Can a family request a hysterectomy for their retarded daughter? Physicians are facing moral dilemmas with increasing frequency. But how should these delicate questions be resolved and by whom? A Casebook of Medical Ethics offers a real-life view of the central issue involved in clinical medical ethics. Since the analysis (...)
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  33. David Lloyd (2005). Cases in Medical Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.
    This interactive independent teaching and learning tutorial can be used by individuals or small groups and takes a problem-based-learning approach to the complex legal and ethical issues raised by six scenarios. Based on real cases clearly demonstrating the problems arising from recent medical advancements, the cases cover reproductive technology, consent, genetic screening, participation in research trials, paternity and confidentiality. Additional features of the CD-ROM are a comprehensive glossary, cross-references to The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook and definitions from the (...)
     
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  34. Andrew Papanikitas (2013). Medical Ethics and Sociology. Elsevier/Mosby.
    Foundations of medical ethics and law -- Professionalism and medical ethics -- The doctor, the patient, and society -- Ethics and law at the beginning and end of life -- Healthcare commissioning and resource allocation -- Introduction to sociology and disease -- Experience of health and illness -- Organization of health care provision in the UK -- Inequalities in health and health care provision -- Epidemiology and public health -- Clinical governance.
     
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  35. J. K. Mason (2003/2002). Law and Medical Ethics. Lexisnexis Uk.
    This new edition of Law and Medical Ethics continues to chart the ever-widening field that the topics cover. The interplay between the health caring professions and the public during the period intervening since the last edition has, perhaps, been mainly dominated by wide-ranging changes in the administration of the National Health Service and of the professions themselves but these have been paralleled by important developments in medical jurisprudence.
     
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  36.  15
    Allison Merrick, Rochelle Green, Thomas V. Cunningham, Leah R. Eisenberg & D. Micah Hester (2016). Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):141-149.
    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students’ ethical reasoning. This paper discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical students that we have devised, (...)
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  37.  11
    Marek Czarkowski & Krzysztof Różanowski (2009). Polish Research Ethics Committees in the European Union System of Assessing Medical Experiments. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):201-212.
    The Polish equivalents of Research Ethics Committees are Bioethics Committees (BCs). A questionnaire study has been undertaken to determine their situation. The BC is usually comprised of 13 members. Nine of these are doctors and four are non-doctors. In 2006 BCs assessed an average of 27.3 ± 31.7 (range: 0–131) projects of clinical trials and 71.1 ± 139.8 (range: 0–638) projects of other types of medical research. During one BC meeting an average of 10.3 ± 14.7 (range: 0–71) projects (...)
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  38.  2
    Troyen A. Brennan (1993). [Book Review] Just Doctoring, Medical Ethics in the Liberal State. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (4):832-834.
    _Just Doctoring_ draws the doctor-patient relationship out of the consulting room and into the middle of the legal and political arenas where it more and more frequently appears. Traditionally, medical ethics has focused on the isolated relationship of physician to patient in a setting that has left the physician virtually untouched by market constraints or government regulation. Arguing that changes in health care institutions and legal attention to patient rights have made conventional approaches obsolete, Troyen Brennan points the way (...)
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  39.  20
    Robert M. Veatch (1977). Case Studies in Medical Ethics. Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
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  40.  19
    Stephen E. Lammers & Allen Verhey (eds.) (1998). On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics. William B. Eerdmans Pub..
    Collecting a wide range of contemporary and classical theological essays dealing with medical ethics, this volume is the finest resource available for engaging ...
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  41.  31
    Clement A. Adebamowo (2010). Medical Ethics Education: A Survey of Opinion of Medical Students in a Nigerian University. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):85-93.
    In Nigeria, medical education remains focused on the traditional clinical and basic medical science components, leaving students to develop moral attitudes passively through observation and intuition. In order to ascertain the adequacy of this method of moral formations, we studied the opinions of medical students in a Nigerian university towards medical ethics training. Self administered semi-structured questionnaires were completed by final year medical students of the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. There were 82 (...)
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  42.  31
    Marcel J. H. Kenter (2009). Regulating Human Participants Protection in Medical Research and the Accreditation of Medical Research Ethics Committees in the Netherlands. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):33-43.
    The review system on research with human participants in the Netherlands is characterised as a decentralised controlled and integrated peer review system. It consists of an independent governmental body, the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (or Central Committee), which regulates the review of research proposals by accredited Medical Research Ethics Committees (MRECs). The legal basis was founded in 1999 with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act. The review system is a decentralised arrangement since most research (...)
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  43.  9
    Goran Mijaljica (2014). Medical Ethics, Bioethics and Research Ethics Education Perspectives in South East Europe in Graduate Medical Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):237-247.
    Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, (...)
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  44.  20
    Yitzhak Brand (2010). Essays: Religious Medical Ethics: A Study of the Rulings of Rabbi Waldenberg. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):495-520.
    This article seeks to examine how religious ideas that are not the focus of a particular halakhic question become the crux of the ruling, thereby molding it and dictating its bias. We will attempt to demonstrate this through a study of Jewish medical ethics, based on some of the rulings of one of the greatest halakhic decisors of the previous generation: Rabbi Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg (1915–2006). Rabbi Waldenberg molds his rulings on the basis of a religious principle asserting that (...)
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  45.  6
    Emanuela Turillazzi & Margherita Neri (2014). Medical Error Disclosure: From the Therapeutic Alliance to Risk Management: The Vision of the New Italian Code of Medical Ethics. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):57.
    The Italian code of medical deontology recently approved stipulates that physicians have the duty to inform the patient of each unwanted event and its causes, and to identify, report and evaluate adverse events and errors. Thus the obligation to supply information continues to widen, in some way extending beyond the doctor-patient relationship to become an essential tool for improving the quality of professional services.
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  46.  5
    Professor John R. Williams (2005). The Ethics Activities of the World Medical Association. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the Ethics Unit (...)
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  47.  4
    Alan Jotkowitz (2014). The Seminal Contribution of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein to the Development of Modern Jewish Medical Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):285-309.
    The purpose of this essay is to show how, on a wide variety of issues, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein broke new ground with the established Orthodox rabbinic consensus and blazed a new trail in Jewish medical ethics. Rabbi Feinstein took power away from the rabbis and let patients decide their treatment, he opened the door for a Jewish approach to palliative care, he supported the use of new technologies to aid in reproduction, he endorsed altruistic living organ donation and recognized (...)
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  48.  2
    D. Black & F. Subotsky (1982). Focus: Current Issues in Medical Ethics: Medical Ethics and Child Psychiatry. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (1):5-8.
    The authors, both child psychiatrists, discuss some of the ethical problems that arise in their practice, in relation to advice given in the British Medical Association's Handbook of Medical Ethics. They find that the main problems occur when multidisciplinary cooperation is needed. Their concern about confidentiality is shared in the papers by Kenny, Pheby and their commentators, which follow this one.
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  49.  1
    Mohsen Rezaei Aderyani & Mehrzad Kiani (2015). A Comparative Study of the Foundations of Medical Ethics in Secular and Islamic Thought. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (40):27-46.
    The principles of medical ethics, common as they are in the world at the present time, have been formed in the context of Western secular communities; consequently, secular principles and values are inevitably manifested in all corners of medical ethics. Medical ethics is at its infancy in Iran. In order to incorporate medical ethics into the country's health system, either the same thoughts, principles, rules, and codes of Western communities should be translated and taught across the (...)
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  50.  33
    Albert R. Jonsen (2000). A Short History of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine and the (...) profession. However, few know what the traditional ethics are and how they came into being. This book provides a brief tour of the complex story of medical ethics evolved over centuries in both Western and Eastern culture. It sets this story in the social and cultural contexts in which the work of healing was practiced and suggests that, behind the many different perceptions about the ethical duties of physicians, certain themes appear constantly, and may be relevant to modern debates. The book begins with the Hippocratic medicine of ancient Greece, moves through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Enlightenment in Europe, and the long history of Indian and Chinese medicine, ending as the problems raised modern medical science and technology challenge the settled ethics of the long tradition. (shrink)
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