Search results for 'Ethics, Research' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Working Group for the Study of Ethical Issues in International Nursing Research (2003). Ethical Considerations in International Nursing Research: A Report From the International Centre for Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics 10 (2):122-137.score: 450.0
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  2. Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau (2010). Business Ethics Research: A Global Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):39 - 53.score: 93.0
    Using 10 years of publication data (1999-2008) from 10 leading business ethics journals, we examine global patterns of business ethics research and contributing institutions and scholars. Although U.S. academic institutions continue to lead in the contributions toward business ethics research, Asian and European institutions have made significant progress. Our study shows that business ethics research output is closely linked to the missions of the institutions driven by their values or religious belief. An additional analysis of the productivity (...)
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  3. V. Brand (2009). Empirical Business Ethics Research and Paradigm Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):429 - 449.score: 93.0
    Despite the so-called ‘paradigm wars’ in many social sciences disciplines in recent decades, debate as to the appropriate philosophical basis for research in business ethics has been comparatively non-existent. Any consideration of paradigm issues in the theoretical business ethics literature is rare and only very occasional references to relevant issues have been made in the empirical journal literature. This is very much the case in the growing fields of cross-cultural business ethics and undergraduate student attitudes, and examples from these (...)
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  4. Richard A. Bernardi, Michael R. Melton, Scott D. Roberts & David F. Bean (2008). Fostering Ethics Research: An Analysis of the Accounting, Finance and Marketing Disciplines. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):157 - 170.score: 93.0
    This study compares the level of ethics research published in 25 business-ethics journals and the Top-40 journals for the accounting, finance, and marketing disciplines. This research documents an increasing level of ethics research in the accounting and marketing disciplines starting in 1992. While the level of finance doctorates reported by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has increased at a higher rate (40.4%) than accounting (18.4%) and marketing (32.2%) since 1995, this increase has not (...)
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  5. Derek Dalton & Marc Ortegren (2011). Gender Differences in Ethics Research: The Importance of Controlling for the Social Desirability Response Bias. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):73-93.score: 90.0
    Gender is one of the most frequently studied variables within the ethics literature. In prior studies that find gender differences, females consistently report more ethical responses than males. However, prior research also indicates that females are more prone to responding in a socially desirable fashion. Consequently, it is uncertain whether gender differences in ethical decision-making exist because females are more ethical or perhaps because females are more prone to the social desirability response bias. Using a sample of 30 scenarios (...)
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  6. Sonja Grover (2004). What's Human Rights Got to Do with It? On the Proposed Changes to SSHRC Ethics Research Policy. Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (3):249-262.score: 90.0
    Whats human rights got to do with it? That is, whats human rights got to do with the June 2004 report of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Ethics Special Working Committee to the Inter-Agency Advisory Panel on Research Ethics. The disturbing answer is not enough. Certain key recommendations of the working committee, it is suggested, would unacceptably weaken the researchers legal and moral accountability to research participants. Those particular recommendations rely on misguided references to academic freedom (...)
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  7. Miguel Alzola (2011). The Reconciliation Project: Separation and Integration in Business Ethics Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (1):19 - 36.score: 90.0
    This article is about the relationship between business and ethics in academic research. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the status of the separation and the integration theses. In the course of this article, I defend the claim that neither separation nor integration is entirely accurate; indeed they are both potentially confusing to our audience. A strategy of reconciliation of normative and descriptive approaches is proposed. The reconciliation project does not entail synthesizing or dividing prescriptive and empirical (...)
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  8. Joseph R. Herkert (2001). Future Directions in Engineering Ethics Research: Microethics, Macroethics and the Role of Professional Societies. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):403-414.score: 84.0
    Three frames of reference for engineering ethics are discussed—individual, professional and social—which can be further broken down into “microethics” concerned with individuals and the internal relations of the engineering profession and “macroethics” referring to the collective social responsibility of the engineering profession and to societal decisions about technology. Few attempts have been made at integrating microethical and macroethical approaches to engineering ethics. The approach suggested here is to focus on the role of professional engineering societies in linking individual and professional (...)
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  9. Gary Allen (2008). Getting Beyond Form Filling: The Role of Institutional Governance in Human Research Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):105-116.score: 82.0
    It has become almost a truism to describe the interaction between research ethics committees and researchers as being marred by distrust and conflict. The ethical conduct of researchers is increasingly a matter of institutional concern because of the degree to which non-compliance with national standards can expose the entire institution to risk. This has transformed research ethics into what some have described as a research ethics industry. In an operational sense, there is considerable focus on modifying (...) behaviour through a combination of education and sanctions. The assessment of whether a researcher is ethical is too often based on whether they submit their work for review by an ethics committee. However, is such an approach making a useful contribution to the actual ethical conduct of research and the protection of the interests of participants? Does a focus on ethical review minimise institutional risk? Instead it has been suggested that ethics committees may be distorting or frustrating useful research and are promoting a culture of either mindless rule following or frustrated resistance. An alternative governance approach is required. There is a need for a strong institutional focus on promoting and supporting the reflective practice of researchers through every stage of their work. By situating research ethics within the broader framework of institutional governance, this paper suggests it is possible to establish arrangements that actually facilitate excellent and ethical research. (shrink)
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  10. Jong Foo & Stephen Wilson (2012). An Analysis on the Research Ethics Cases Managed by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Between 1997 and 2010. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):621-631.score: 81.0
    The growing emphasis on the importance of publishing scientific findings in the academic world has led to increasing prevalence of potentially significant publications in which scientific and ethical rigour may be questioned. This has not only hindered research progress, but also eroded public trust in all scientific advances. In view of the increasing concern and the complexity of research misconduct, the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) was established in 1997 to manage cases with ethical implications. In order to (...)
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  11. K. G. Davey (2009). Reflections on My Experience in Human Research Ethics. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):27-31.score: 81.0
    This paper was delivered at the 2009 annual conference of the National Council on Ethics in Human Research. It is a reflective piece based on many years of experience with human research ethics and the role of Research Ethics Boards in human participant research.
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  12. Timothy N. Atkinson (2008). Using Creative Writing Techniques to Enhance the Case Study Method in Research Integrity and Ethics Courses. Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):33-50.score: 81.0
    The following article explores the use of creative writing techniques to teach research ethics, breathe life into case study preparation, and train students to think of their settings as complex organizational environments with multiple actors and stakeholders.
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  13. Kryste Ferguson, Sandra Masur, Lynne Olson, Julio Ramirez, Elisa Robyn & Karen Schmaling (2007). Enhancing the Culture of Research Ethics on University Campuses. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):189-198.score: 81.0
    Institutions create their own internal cultures, including the culture of ethics that pervades scientific research, academic policy, and administrative philosophy. This paper addresses some of the issues involved in institutional enhancement of its culture of research ethics, focused on individual empowerment and strategies that individuals can use to initiate institutional change.
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  14. Doug Brugge & Alison Kole (2003). A Case Study of Community-Based Participatory Research Ethics: The Healthy Public Housing Initiative. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):485-501.score: 81.0
    We conducted and analyzed qualitative interviews with 12 persons working on the Healthy Public Housing Initiative in Boston, Massachusetts in 2001. Our goal was to generate ideas and themes related to the ethics of the community-based participatory research in which they were engaged. Specifically, we wanted to see if we found themes that differed from conventional research that is based on an individualistic ethics. There were clearly distinct ethical issues raised with respect to projects and individuals who engage (...)
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  15. Michelle Cunningham (2010). Research Ethics in a Business School Context: The Establishment of a Review Committee and the Primary Issues of Concern. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (1):43-66.score: 81.0
    This paper describes the establishment of and the issues experienced by the Research Ethics Committee (REC) of a Business School within a University in Ireland. It identifies the issue of voluntarily given informed consent as a key challenge for RECs operating in a Business School context. The paper argues that whilst the typology of ethical issues in business research are similar to the wider social sciences, the fact that much research is carried out in the workplace adds (...)
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  16. Goran Mijaljica (2013). Medical Ethics, Bioethics and Research Ethics Education Perspectives in South East Europe in Graduate Medical Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):1-11.score: 81.0
    Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Macedonia and Montenegro (...)
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  17. Merryn Ekberg (2012). Reassessing the Role of the Biomedical Research Ethics Committee. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):335-352.score: 81.0
    The role of the Research Ethics Committee (REC) in the design, conduct and dissemination of scientific research is still evolving and many important questions remain unanswered. Hence, the aim of this paper is to address some of the uncertainty that exists around the role and responsibilities of RECs and to discuss some of the controversy that exists over the criteria that RECs should follow when evaluating a research proposal. The discussion is organised around five of the major (...)
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  18. Sami Alsmadi (2008). Marketing Research Ethics: Researcher's Obligations Toward Human Subjects. Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):153-160.score: 79.0
    This paper addresses the growing concern over violation of research ethics in marketing, in particular rights of human subjects in fieldwork, notably the right to informed consent; right to privacy and confidentiality; and right not to be deceived or harmed as a result of participation in a research. The paper highlights the interaction of the three main parties involved in most marketing research: the sponsoring organization (client or user), researcher, and participant in the survey, focusing on researcher’s (...)
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  19. Christian Simon & Maghboeba Mosavel (2011). Getting Personal: Ethics and Identity in Global Health Research. Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):82-92.score: 78.0
    ‘Researcher identity’ affects global health research in profound and complex ways. Anthropologists in particular have led the way in portraying the multiple, and sometimes tension-generating, identities that researchers ascribe to themselves, or have ascribed to them, in their places of research. However, the central importance of researcher identity in the ethical conduct of global health research has yet to be fully appreciated. The capacity of researchers to respond effectively to the ethical tensions surrounding their identities is hampered (...)
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  20. Simon Woods & Pauline Mccormack (2013). Disputing the Ethics of Research: The Challenge From Bioethics and Patient Activism to the Interpretation of the Declaration of Helsinki in Clinical Trials. Bioethics 27 (5):243-250.score: 78.0
    In this paper we argue that the consensus around normative standards for the ethics of research in clinical trials, strongly influenced by the Declaration of Helsinki, is perceived from various quarters as too conservative and potentially restrictive of research that is seen as urgent and necessary. We examine this problem from the perspective of various challengers who argue for alternative approaches to what ought or ought not to be permitted. Key themes within this analysis will examine these claims (...)
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  21. Teresa Moore & Kristy Richardson (2013). The Low Risk Research Ethics Application Process at CQUniversity Australia. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (3):211-230.score: 78.0
    The CQUniversity Australia Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) is a human ethics research committee registered under the auspices of the National Health and Medical Research Council. In 2009 an external review of CQUniversity Australia’s HREC policies and procedures recommended that a low risk research process be available to the institution’s researchers. Subsequently, in 2010 the Human Research Ethics Committee Low Risk Application Procedure came into operation. This paper examines the applications made under the Human (...) Ethics Committee Low Risk Application Procedure during the course of 2010 and 2011. The paper contributes to the literature analyzing the decision-making processes of research review committees through an analysis of the quantitative data relating to the low risk research applications made and through discourse analysis of the qualitative data represented by the assessment comments of the members of the Committee. (shrink)
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  22. Paul J. Friedman (1996). An Introduction to Research Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):443-456.score: 76.0
    Practical issues throughout scientific research can be found to have an ethical aspect. There is a gray area in which scientific error (“honest error”) may be difficult to distinguish from unacceptably poor research practice or an unethical failure to follow scientific norms. Further, there is no clear margin between deceptive practices which are widely accepted and those which must be considered fraudulent. Practical problems arise in matters of data management and presentation, authorship, publication practices, “grantsmanship”, and rights of (...)
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  23. Dominique Rivière (2011). Looking From the Outside/In: Re-Thinking Research Ethics Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (3):193-204.score: 76.0
    This paper shares my reflections on the research ethics review process, from the point of view of both a qualitative researcher and a member of an institutional research ethics review board. By considering research ethics review, first as practice, then as policy, as a relationship and, finally, as a performance, I attempt to outline a new vision of research ethics, one that engages seriously with the relationship between receiving ethics approval, and conducting ethical research.
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  24. Annalee Yassi, Jaime Breilh, Shafik Dharamsi, Karen Lockhart & Jerry M. Spiegel (2013). The Ethics of Ethics Reviews in Global Health Research: Case Studies Applying a New Paradigm. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (2):83-101.score: 76.0
    With increasing calls for global health research there is growing concern regarding the ethical challenges encountered by researchers from high-income countries (HICs) working in low or middle-income countries (LMICs). There is a dearth of literature on how to address these challenges in practice. In this article, we conduct a critical analysis of three case studies of research conducted in LMICs. We apply emerging ethical guidelines and principles specific to global health research and offer practical strategies that researchers (...)
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  25. Dan McArthur (2009). Good Ethics Can Sometimes Mean Better Science: Research Ethics and the Milgram Experiments. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):69-79.score: 75.0
    All agree that if the Milgram experiments were proposed today they would never receive approval from a research ethics board. However, the results of the Milgram experiments are widely cited across a broad range of academic literature from psychology to moral philosophy. While interpretations of the experiments vary, few commentators, especially philosophers, have expressed doubts about the basic soundness of the results. What I argue in this paper is that this general approach to the experiments might be in error. (...)
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  26. John F. Kilner (2009). An Inclusive Ethics for the Twenty-First Century: Implications for Stem Cell Research. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):683-722.score: 75.0
    An important contribution of Christian ethics in the pluralistic world of the twenty-first century is to emphasize inclusivity. Rather than promoting the interests of certain groups at the expense of the most vulnerable, society does well to prioritize ways forward that benefit all. For stem cell research, inclusivity entails benefiting or at least protecting the beneficiaries of treatment, the sources of materials, and the subjects of research. Adult stem cells are already benefiting many ill patients without causing harm, (...)
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  27. Keymanthri Moodley & Landon Myer (2007). Health Research Ethics Committees in South Africa 12 Years Into Democracy. BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-8.score: 75.0
    Background Despite the growth of biomedical research in South Africa, there are few insights into the operation of Research Ethics Committees (RECs) in this setting. We investigated the composition, operations and training needs of health RECs in South Africa against the backdrop of national and international guidelines. Methods The 12 major health RECs in South Africa were surveyed using semi-structured questionnaires that investigated the composition and functions of each REC as well as the operational issues facing committees. Results (...)
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  28. Janet Borgerson (2005). Addressing the 'Global Basic Structure' in the Ethics of International Health Research Involving Human Subjects. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:235-249.score: 75.0
    The context of international health research involving human subjects, and this should appear obvious, is the human community. As such, basic questions of how human beings should be treated by other human beings, particularly in situations of unequal power – e.g., in the form of control, choice, or opportunity – lay at the foundations of related ethical discourse when ethics are discussed at all. I trace a narrative that follows upon a recent revision process of international guidelines for biomedical (...)
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  29. Sven Ove Hansson (2011). Do We Need a Special Ethics for Research? Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):21-29.score: 75.0
    Research is subject to more stringent ethical requirements than most other human activities, and a procedure that is otherwise allowed may be forbidden in research. Hence, risk-taking is more restricted in scientific research than in most non-research contexts, and privacy is better protected in scientific questionnaires than in marketing surveys. Potential arguments for this difference are scrutinized. The case in its favour appears to be weak. A stronger case can be made in favour of a difference (...)
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  30. Marcel J. H. Kenter (2009). Regulating Human Participants Protection in Medical Research and the Accreditation of Medical Research Ethics Committees in the Netherlands. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):33-43.score: 75.0
    The review system on research with human participants in the Netherlands is characterised as a decentralised controlled and integrated peer review system. It consists of an independent governmental body, the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (or Central Committee), which regulates the review of research proposals by accredited Medical Research Ethics Committees (MRECs). The legal basis was founded in 1999 with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act. The review system is a decentralised arrangement (...)
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  31. Michael Davis (2001). The Professional Approach to Engineering Ethics: Five Research Questions. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):379-390.score: 75.0
    This paper argues that research for engineering ethics should routinely involve philosophers, social scientists, and engineers, and should focus for now on certain basic questions such as: Who is an engineer? What is engineering? What do engineers do? How do they make decisions? And how much control do they actually have over what they do?
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  32. Kenneth D. Pimple (2002). Six Domains of Research Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):191-205.score: 75.0
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a simple yet comprehensive organizing scheme for the responsible conduct of research (RCR). The heuristic offered here should prove helpful in research ethics education, where the many and heterogeneous elements of RCR can be bewildering, as well as research into research integrity and efforts to form RCR policy and regulations. The six domains are scientific integrity, collegiality, protection of human subjects, animal welfare, institutional integrity, and social responsibility.
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  33. Elizabeth H. Bassett & Kate O'Riordan (2002). Ethics of Internet Research: Contesting the Human Subjects Research Model. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):233-247.score: 75.0
    The human subjects researchmodel is increasingly invoked in discussions ofethics for Internet research. Here we seek toquestion the widespread application of thismodel, critiquing it through the two themes ofspace and textual form. Drawing on ourexperience of a previous piece ofresearch, we highlightthe implications of re-considering thetextuality of the Internet in addition to thespatial metaphors that are more commonlydeployed to describe Internet activity. Weargue that the use of spatial metaphors indescriptions of the Internet has shaped theadoption of the human subjects (...)
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  34. Raymond E. Spier (1998). Ethics and the Funding of Research and Development at Universities. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):375-384.score: 75.0
    As a result of a gradual shifting of the resourcing of universities from the public to the private sector, the academic institution has been required to acquire some of its additional funding from industry via partnerships based on research and development. This paper examines this new condition and asks whether the different mission statements or modi operandi of the university vis à vis industry throws up additional ethical issues. While there are conditions where the interactions between industry and the (...)
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  35. Douglas C. Frechtling & Soyoung Boo (2012). On the Ethics of Management Research: An Exploratory Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (2):149-160.score: 75.0
    While there is an abundant academic literature on professional codes of ethics, there appears to be few devoted to assessing the compliance of management research with such codes. This article presents the results of applying the World Association for Public Opinion Research (WAPOR) Code of Professional Ethics and Practices to research articles based on probability sample surveys in the top three academic journals covering tourism, hospitality, and related fields. Four research questions are posed to focus application (...)
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  36. G. Maxwell & R. Beattie (2004). The Ethics of in-Company Research: An Exploratory Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (3):243-256.score: 75.0
    This paper seeks to advance ethical practice in business and integrate ethics with management curricula. It focuses on the ethical dimensions of in-company research conducted by human resource practitioners who are part time students on a postgraduate research degree award (M.Sc. in HRM). These dual roles of academic researcher in HRM and HR practitioner can become blurred and present particular ethical considerations. Beyond ethical perspectives of HRM, the paper investigates the ethics of in-company research in terms of (...)
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  37. Bruce Macfarlane & Yoshiko Saitoh (2008). Research Ethics in Japanese Higher Education: Faculty Attitudes and Cultural Mediation. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):181-195.score: 75.0
    Principles of research ethics, derived largely from Western philosophical thought, are spreading across the world of higher education. Since 2006 the Japanese Ministry of Education has required universities in Japan to establish codes of ethical conduct and ensure that procedures are in place to punish research misconduct. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 13 academics in a research-intensive university in Japan, this paper considers how research ethics is interpreted in relation to their own practice. Interviewees articulated a (...)
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  38. Colleen Reid & Elana Brief (2009). Confronting Condescending Ethics: How Community-Based Research Challenges Traditional Approaches to Consent, Confidentiality, and Capacity. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):75-85.score: 75.0
    Community based research is conducted by, for, and with the participation of community members, and aims to ensure that knowledge contributes to making a concrete and constructive difference in the world (The Loka Institute 2002). Yet decisions about research ethics are often controlled outside the research community itself. In this analysis we grapple with the imposition of a community confidentiality clause and the implications it had for consent, confidentiality, and capacity in a province-wide community based research (...)
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  39. Michiel Brumsen & Ibo van de Poel (2001). A Special Section on Research in Engineering Ethics Towards a Research Programme for Ethics and Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):365-378.score: 75.0
    In this editorial contribution, two issues relevant to the question, what should be at the top of the research agenda for ethics and technology, are identified and discussed. Firstly: can, and do, engineers make a difference to the degree to which technology leads to morally desirable outcomes? What role does professional autonomy play here, and what are its limits? And secondly, what should be the scope of engineers’ responsibility; that is to say, on which issues are they, as engineers, (...)
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  40. Jongyoung Kim & Kibeom Park (2013). Ethical Modernization: Research Misconduct and Research Ethics Reforms in Korea Following the Hwang Affair. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):355-380.score: 75.0
    The Hwang affair, a dramatic and far reaching instance of scientific fraud, shocked the world. This collective national failure prompted various organizations in Korea, including universities, regulatory agencies, and research associations, to engage in self-criticism and research ethics reforms. This paper aims, first, to document and review research misconduct perpetrated by Hwang and members of his research team, with particular attention to the agencies that failed to regulate and then supervise Hwang’s research. The paper then (...)
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  41. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 75.0
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given (...)
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  42. Arri Eisen & Kathy P. Parker (2004). A Model for Teaching Research Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):693-704.score: 75.0
    A model is described for implementing a program in research ethics education in the face of federal and institutional mandates and current resource, disciplinary, and infrastructure limitations. Also discussed are the historical background, content and evaluation process of the workshop at the heart of the program, which reaches a diverse group of over 250 students per year—from first-year graduate students in basic research labs to clinical fellows. The workshop addresses central issues in both everyday laboratory ethics and in (...)
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  43. Susan A. Tilley (2008). A Troubled Dance: Doing the Work of Research Ethics Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):91-104.score: 75.0
    The fast growing interest in the work of university ethics review boards is evident in the proliferation of research and literature in the area. This article focuses on a Research Ethics Board (REB) in the Canadian context. In-depth, open-ended interviews with REB members and findings from a qualitative study designed to examine the ethics review of school-based research are used to illustrate points raised in the paper. The author’s experiences as academic researcher, advisor to student researchers and (...)
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  44. Praveen Aggarwal, Rajiv Vaidyanathan & Stephen Castleberry (2012). Managerial and Public Attitudes Toward Ethics in Marketing Research. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):463-481.score: 75.0
    This research updates and significantly extends Akaah and Riordon’s (J Market Res 26:112–120, 1989 ) evaluation of ethical perceptions of marketing research misconduct among marketing research professionals. In addition to examining changes in perceptions toward key marketing research practices over time, we assess professionals’ judgments on the ethicality, importance, and occurrence of a variety of new marketing research ethics situations in both online and offline contexts. In a second study, we assess ethical judgments of the (...)
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  45. Luc Van Liedekerke & Geert Demuijnck (2012). Business Ethics as a Field of Training, Teaching and Research in Europe. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (S1):29-41.score: 75.0
    In this survey of business ethics in Europe, we compare the present state of business ethics in Europe with the situation as described by Enderle (BEER 5(1):33–46, 1996 ). At that time, business ethics was still dominated by a mainly philosophical, normative analysis of business issues with a maximum of 25 chairs in business ethics all over Europe. It has since expanded dramatically in numbers as well as diversified into many different domains. We find this rich diversity in the conception (...)
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  46. Marek Czarkowski & Krzysztof Różanowski (2009). Polish Research Ethics Committees in the European Union System of Assessing Medical Experiments. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):201-212.score: 75.0
    The Polish equivalents of Research Ethics Committees are Bioethics Committees (BCs). A questionnaire study has been undertaken to determine their situation. The BC is usually comprised of 13 members. Nine of these are doctors and four are non-doctors. In 2006 BCs assessed an average of 27.3 ± 31.7 (range: 0–131) projects of clinical trials and 71.1 ± 139.8 (range: 0–638) projects of other types of medical research. During one BC meeting an average of 10.3 ± 14.7 (range: 0–71) (...)
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  47. Sara R. Jordan & Phillip W. Gray (2014). Reporting Ethics Committee Approval in Public Administration Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):77-97.score: 75.0
    While public administration research is thriving because of increased attention to social scientific rigor, lingering problems of methods and ethics remain. This article investigates the reporting of ethics approval within public administration publications. Beginning with an overview of ethics requirements regarding research with human participants, I turn to an examination of human participants protections for public administration research. Next, I present the findings of my analysis of articles published in the top five public administration journals over the (...)
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  48. Brian Schrag (2005). Teaching Research Ethics: Can Web-Based Instruction Satisfy Appropriate Pedagogical Objectives? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):347-366.score: 75.0
    Ethical tasks faced by researchers in science and engineering as they engage in research include recognition of moral problems in their practice, finding solutions to those moral problems, judging moral actions and engaging in preventive ethics. Given these issues, appropriate pedagogical objectives for research ethics education include (1) teaching researchers to recognize moral issues in their research, (2) teaching researchers to solve practical moral problems in their research from the perspective of the moral agent, (3) teaching (...)
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  49. Debabrata Talukdar (2011). Patterns of Research Productivity in the Business Ethics Literature: Insights From Analyses of Bibliometric Distributions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):137 - 151.score: 75.0
    In any academic discipline, published articles in respective journals represent "production units" of scientific knowledge, and bibliometric distributions reflect the patterns in such outputs across authors or "producers." Closely following the analysis approach used for similar studies in the economics and finance literature, we present the first study to examine whether there exists an empirical regularity in the bibliometric patterns of research productivity in the business ethics literature. Our results present strong evidence that there indeed exists a distinct empirical (...)
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  50. Will C. van den Hoonaard (2006). New Angles and Tangles in the Ethics Review of Research. Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):261-274.score: 75.0
    This articles considers the larger, external and the micro, internal forces that impinge on the nature and impact of contemporary research-ethics codes. The larger forces that shape the impact of codes involve the increase in public and governmental concern with privacy protection, changes within disciplines, and the rise of research entrepreneurship. In terms of micro-level forces, the article explores the continuing problems associated with the bio-medical approach to research-ethics, on-going instability for some types of social research, (...)
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