Search results for 'Ethnography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas Scheffer (2007). Event and Process: An Exercise in Analytical Ethnography. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (3):167 - 197.score: 18.0
    Analytical ethnography does not presume a principal analytical frame. It does not know (yet) where and when the field takes place. Rather, the ethnographer is in search for appropriate spatiotemporal frames in correspondence with the occurrences in the field. Accordingly, the author organizes a dialogue between conceptual frames and his various empirical accounts. He confronts snapshots of English Crown Court proceedings with models of event and process from micro-sociology and macro-sociology. A range of–more or less early or late, relevant (...)
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  2. Duska Rosenberg (2001). Three Steps to Ethnography: A Discussion of Interdisciplinary Contributions. AI and Society 15 (4):295-315.score: 18.0
    In this paper recent research involving interdisciplinary ethnography is presented as an exploration of its contribution to studies of people and technology in the workplace. Three main patterns of interaction between ethnography and ‘the others’ are examined. First, the influence of ethnography in promoting people-oriented perspectives of technology is discussed with reference to workplace studies in manufacturing. Second, ethnography contribution to the development of hybrid methods for the design and implementation of technology for use in the (...)
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  3. Thomas A. Lewis (2010). Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics: Or Ethnography and the Comparative Religious Ethics Local. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):395-403.score: 15.0
    Recent ethnographic studies of lived ethics, such as those of Leela Prasad and Saba Mahmood, present valuable opportunities for comparative religious ethics. This essay argues that developments in philosophical and religious ethics over the last three decades have supported a strong interest in thick descriptions of what it means to be human. This anthropological turn has thereby laid important groundwork for the encounter between these scholars and new ethnographic studies. Nonetheless, an encounter it is. Each side brings novel questions to (...)
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  4. Peter Benson & Kevin Lewis O'neill (2007). Facing Risk: Levinas, Ethnography, and Ethics. Anthropology of Consciousness 18 (2):29-55.score: 15.0
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  5. Constance Iloh & William G. Tierney (2014). Using Ethnography to Understand Twenty-First Century College Life. Human Affairs 24 (1):20-39.score: 15.0
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  6. Mark W. Risjord (2000). The Politics of Explanation and the Origins of Ethnography. Perspectives on Science 8 (1):29-52.score: 12.0
    : At the turn of the twentieth century, comparative studies of human culture (ethnology) gave way to studies of the details of individual societies (ethnography). While many writers have noticed a political sub-text to this paradigm shift, they have regarded political interests as extrinsic to the change. The central historical issue is why anthropologists stopped asking global, comparative questions and started asking local questions about features of particular societies. The change in questions cannot be explained by empirical factors alone, (...)
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  7. Peter R. Grahame (1998). Ethnography, Institutions, and the Problematic of the Everyday World. Human Studies 21 (4):347-360.score: 12.0
    This essay describes institutional ethnography as a method of inquiry pioneered by Dorothy E. Smith, and introduces a collection of papers which make distinctive contributions to the development of this novel form of investigation. Institutional ethnography is presented as a research strategy which emerges from Smith's wide-ranging explorations of the problematic of the everyday world. Smith's conception of the everyday world as problematic involves a critical departure from the concepts and procedures of more conventional sociologies. She argues for (...)
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  8. Anne Beaulieu (2004). Mediating Ethnography: Objectivity and the Making of Ethnographies of the Internet. Social Epistemology 18 (2 & 3):139 – 163.score: 12.0
    This paper aims to contribute to current discussions about methods in anthropological (especially ethnographic) research on the cultures of the internet. It does so by considering how technology has been presented in turn as an epistemological boon and bane in methodological discourse around virtual or online ethnography, and cyberanthropology. It maps these discussions with regards to intellectual traditions and ambitions of ethnographic research and social science, and considers how these views of technology relate to modernist discourse about the value (...)
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  9. Tim Ingold (2001). The Use and Abuse of Ethnography. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):337-337.score: 12.0
    Human beings grow into cultural knowledge, within a social and environmental context, rather than receiving it ready made. This seems also to be true of cetaceans. Rendell and Whitehead invoke a notion of culture long since rejected by anthropologists, and fundamentally misunderstand the nature of ethnography. A properly ethnographic study of cetaceans would directly subvert their positivist methodology and reductionist assumptions.
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  10. Michael Herzfeld (1987). Anthropology Through the Looking-Glass: Critical Ethnography in the Margins of Europe. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    Using Greek ethnography as a mirror for an ethnography of anthropology itself, this book reveals the ways in which the discipline of anthropology is ensnared in the same political and social symbolism as its object of study. The author pushes the comparative goals of anthropology beyond the traditional separation of tribal object from detached scientific observer, and offers the discipline a critical source of reflexive insight based on empirical ethnography rather than on ideological speculation alone.
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  11. I. I. I. William W. Young (2014). The Shape of Reflexivity: A Pragmatist Analysis of Religious Ethnography. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 35 (1):42-64.score: 12.0
    In recent years, religious studies has undergone an ethnographic turn. More and more, scholars attend to the social location and significance of religious practice. This approach foregrounds the self-understandings of religious communities and practitioners and raises the question of the relation between ethnography and philosophical analysis. For instance, Saba Mahmood, in The Politics of Piety, draws from ethnographic study so as to critique philosophy’s universalizing claims regarding subjectivity, enabling a recognition of the diverse forms feminist subjectivity and political agency (...)
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  12. Charles L. Bosk (2008). What Would You Do?: Juggling Bioethics and Ethnography. University of Chicago Press.score: 12.0
    In hospital rooms across the country, doctors, nurses, patients, and their families grapple with questions of life and death. Recently, they have been joined at the bedside by a new group of professional experts, bioethicists, whose presence raises a host of urgent questions. How has bioethics evolved into a legitimate specialty? When is such expertise necessary? How do bioethicists make their decisions? And whose interests do they serve? Renowned sociologist Charles L. Bosk has been observing medical care for thirty-five years. (...)
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  13. Jamshid Tehrani (2006). The Uses of Ethnography in the Science of Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):363-364.score: 12.0
    There is considerable scope for developing a more explicit role for ethnography within the research program proposed in the article. Ethnographic studies of cultural micro-evolution would complement experimental approaches by providing insights into the “natural” settings in which cultural behaviours occur. Ethnography can also contribute to the study of cultural macro-evolution by shedding light on the conditions that generate and maintain cultural lineages. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  14. I. I. I. Young (2014). The Shape of Reflexivity: A Pragmatist Analysis of Religious Ethnography. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 35 (1):42-64.score: 12.0
    In recent years, religious studies has undergone an ethnographic turn. More and more, scholars attend to the social location and significance of religious practice. This approach foregrounds the self-understandings of religious communities and practitioners and raises the question of the relation between ethnography and philosophical analysis. For instance, Saba Mahmood, in The Politics of Piety, draws from ethnographic study so as to critique philosophy’s universalizing claims regarding subjectivity, enabling a recognition of the diverse forms feminist subjectivity and political agency (...)
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  15. David F. Armstrong (2002). Ethnography Should Replace Experimentation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):620-621.score: 12.0
    This paper points to the need in ape language research to shift from experimentation to ethnography. We cannot determine what goes on inside the head of an ape when it communicates with a human being, but we can learn about the nature and content of the communication that occurs in such face-to-face interaction. This information is fundamental for establishing a baseline for the abilities of an ape-human common ancestor.
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  16. Michael Huspek (1994). Critical Ethnography and Subjective Experience. Human Studies 17 (1):45 - 63.score: 12.0
    I began this essay by advancing three claims with respect to conducting ethnographic research: the analyst should be disposed to engage Other in a genuinely dialogic fashion so as to produce shared understanding; provision should be made for the analyst to disengage from the dialogue for purposes of self-reflection; and there should be some justificatory grounds for ideology critique. At the same time, I noted the problematic status of these claims on conceptual and methodological grounds and pointed to a need (...)
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  17. Markus Schlecker & Eric Hirsch (2001). Incomplete Knowledge: Ethnography and the Crisis of Context in Studies of Media, Science and Technology. History of the Human Sciences 14 (1):69-87.score: 12.0
    This article examines strands of an intellectual history in Media and Cultural Studies and Science and Technology Studies in both of which researchers were prompted to take up ethnography. Three historical phases of this process are identified. The move between phases was the result of particular displacements and contestations of perspective in the research procedures within each discipline. Thus concerns about appropriate contextualization led to the eventual embrace of anthropological ethnographic methods. The article traces the subsequent emergence of a (...)
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  18. Kathryn M. Borman (2010). An Ethnography of AESA: A Collective Insider's Perspective on the Organization (AESA Presidential Address--1986). Educational Studies 18 (3):359-373.score: 12.0
    (1987). An Ethnography of AESA: A Collective Insider's Perspective on the Organization (AESA Presidential Address--1986) Educational Studies: Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 359-373.
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  19. with Ray DeVries (2008). Bureaucracies of Mass Evasion: Irbs and the Ethnography of Ethics. In Charles L. Bosk (ed.), What Would You Do?: Juggling Bioethics and Ethnography. University of Chicago Press.score: 12.0
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  20. Stefan Hirschauer (2006). Puttings Things Into Words. Ethnographic Description and the Silence of the Social. Human Studies 29 (4):413 - 441.score: 9.0
    The article defines a new referential problem of ethnographic description: the verbalization of the “silent” dimension of the social. As a documentary procedure, description has been devalued by more advanced recording techniques that set a naturalistic standard concerning the reification of qualitative “data.” I discuss this standard from the perspective of the sociology of knowledge and replace it by a challenge unknown to all empirical procedures relying on primary verbalizations of informants. Descriptions have to solve the problems of the voiceless, (...)
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  21. Sharlene Swartz (2010). 'Moral Ecology' and 'Moral Capital': Tools Towards a Sociology of Moral Education From a South African Ethnography. Journal of Moral Education 39 (3):305-327.score: 9.0
    Research and pedagogy in the field of morality and moral education has long been dominated by philosophical and psychological disciplines. Although sociological studies and theorising in the field have not been absent, it has been limited and non?systematic. Drawing on a study that investigated the lived morality of a group of young South Africans growing up in the aftermath of Apartheid and in the townships of Cape Town, this paper surveys the historical contribution made by sociologists to the study of (...)
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  22. Mark Bonta (2009). Taking Deleuze Into the Field: Machinic Ethnography for the Social Sciences Julia Mahler (2008) Lived Temporalities: Exploring Duration in Guatemala. Empirical and Theoretical Studies. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag. Arun Saldanha (2007) Psychedelic White: Goa Trance and the Viscosity of Race. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press. [REVIEW] Deleuze Studies 3 (1):135-142.score: 9.0
  23. Peter R. Grahame & Kamini Maraj Grahame (2009). Points of Departure: Insiders, Outsiders, and Social Relations in Caribbean Field Research. [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (3):291 - 312.score: 9.0
    In traditional ethnographies, it is customarily assumed that the field researcher is an outsider who seeks to acquire an insider’s understanding of the social world being investigated. While conducting field research projects on education and tourism in Trinidad (West Indies) we found that the standard distinction between insider and outsider became problematic for us. Our experiences can be understood in terms of two competing conceptions of fieldwork. One, rooted in classical ethnography, views fieldwork as a process whereby the researcher (...)
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  24. C. Levi-Strauss (1975). Anthropology: Preliminary Definition: Anthropology, Ethnology, Ethnography. Diogenes 23 (90):1-25.score: 9.0
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  25. Pnina Abir-Am (1992). A Historical Ethnography of a Scientific Anniversary in Molecular Biology: The First Protein X-Ray Photograph (1984, 1934). [REVIEW] Social Epistemology 6 (4):323 – 354.score: 9.0
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  26. Sara Ashencaen Crabtree (2012). Research Ethics and the Moral Enterprise of Ethnography: Conjunctions and Contradictions. Ethics and Social Welfare (4):1-20.score: 9.0
    This paper explores the perceptions and experiences of four doctoral researchers to examine how research ethics committee (REC) processes have shaped and influenced specific health-based ethnographic studies. This paper considers how a universal tightening of ethical REC scrutiny at university level, as well as those governing the health and social care sector in the United Kingdom, impacts upon social research involving the inclusion of participants from certain groups. Increased restrictions in ethics scrutiny is justified as protecting vulnerable people from intrusive (...)
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  27. Cristina Grasseni (2007). Managing Cows: An Ethnography of Breeding Practices and Uses of Reproductive Technology in Contemporary Dairy Farming in Lombardy (Italy). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (2):488-510.score: 9.0
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  28. Johannes Fabian (1979). Rule and Process: Thoughts on Ethnography as Communication. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (1):1-26.score: 9.0
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  29. Leslie G. Roman (1993). Double Exposure: The Politics of Feminist Materialist Ethnography. Educational Theory 43 (3):279-308.score: 9.0
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  30. Will C. van den Hoonaard (2003). Is Anonymity an Artifact in Ethnographic Research? Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):141-151.score: 9.0
    While anonymity is a widely-held goal in research-ethics review policies, it is a virtually unachievable goal in ethnographic and qualitative research. This paper explores how anonymity is undermined in the data-gathering, analysis, and publication stages in ethnography. It also examines problems associated with maintaining a collective identity. What maintains anonymity, however, are the natural accretions of daily life, the underuse of data, and the remoteness of place and time between the gathering-data stage and the eventual publications of findings.
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  31. Martin S. Staum (2004). Nature and Nurture in French Ethnography and Anthropology, 1859-1914. Journal of the History of Ideas 65 (3):475-495.score: 9.0
  32. Donald K. Swearer (2010). Focus on Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics: Focus Editor's Comments on “Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics” Essays. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):393-394.score: 9.0
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  33. Carla Bocchetti (2003). Odyssean Ethnography C. Dougherty: The Raft of Odysseus. The Ethnographic Imagination of Homer's Odyssey. Pp. VIII + 243. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. Cased, £32.50. Isbn: 0-19-513036-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):6-.score: 9.0
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  34. John Culbert (2010). Paralyses: Literature, Travel, and Ethnography in French Modernity. University of Nebraska Press.score: 9.0
    Introduction -- The muse of paralysis -- Horizon of conquest: Eugene Fromentin's Algerian narratives -- Slow progress: Jean Paulhan and Madagascar -- Frustration: Michel Leiris -- Atopia: Roland Barthes -- The wake of Ulysses.
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  35. Matthew Day (2007). Godless Savages and Superstitious Dogs: Charles Darwin, Imperial Ethnography, and the Problem of Human Uniqueness. Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (1):49-70.score: 9.0
  36. Mike McNamee (2001). The Guilt of Whistling-Blowing: Conflicts in Action Research and Educational Ethnography. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (3):423–441.score: 9.0
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  37. Joan Pau Rubiés (2006). Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry. Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (4):571-596.score: 9.0
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  38. Kristoffer Neville (2009). Gothicism and Early Modern Historical Ethnography. Journal of the History of Ideas 70 (2):213-234.score: 9.0
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  39. John Maanen (1990). Escape From Modernity: On the Ethnography of Repair and the Repair of Ethnography. [REVIEW] Human Studies 13 (3):275 - 284.score: 9.0
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  40. Jessica Prata Miller (2000). A Critical Moral Ethnography of Social Distrust. Social Philosophy Today 16:141-158.score: 9.0
    This paper explores the ways in which trust and distrust, especially among relative strangers, are connected to social identities and locations. It begins by sketching an account of interpersonal trust, emphasizing the role that socially salient identities, based in part upon cultural figurations, play in their development. It then contends that these cultural figurations both foster and result from distrust of specific social groups, including African Americans, the poor, and (some) women. Treating social roles and relations as central to moral (...)
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  41. Matthew Nicholls (2005). Pliny's Ethnography T. Murphy: Pliny the Elder's Natural History. The Empire in the Encyclopaedia . Pp. X + 233. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Cased, £50. ISBN: 0-19-926288-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):548-.score: 9.0
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  42. Richard A. Quantz & Terence W. O'Connor (1988). Writing Critical Ethnography: Dialogue, Multivoicedness, and Carnival in Cultural Texts. Educational Theory 38 (1):95-109.score: 9.0
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  43. Douglas Rogers (2009). The Old Faith and the Russian Land: A Historical Ethnography of Ethics in the Urals. Cornell University Press.score: 9.0
    In search of salvation on the Stroganov estates -- Faith, family, and land after emancipation -- Youth : exemplars of rural socialism -- Elders : Christian ascetics in the Soviet countryside -- New risks and inequalities in the household sector -- Which khoziain? whose moral community? -- Society, culture, and the churching of Sepych -- Separating post-Soviet worlds? : priestly baptisms and priestless funerals.
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  44. W. W. Sharrock & R. J. Anderson (1982). On the Demise of the Native: Some Observations on and a Proposal for Ethnography. [REVIEW] Human Studies 5 (1):119 - 135.score: 9.0
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  45. John F. Sherry (2008). The Ethnographer's Apprentice: Trying Consumer Culture From the Outside In. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):85 - 95.score: 9.0
    Anthropologists have long wrestled with their impact upon the people they study. Historically, the discipline has served and subverted colonial agendas, but views itself traditionally as an advocate for the disempowered and as an instrument of public policy. Marketing is now among the pre-eminent institutions of cultural stability and change at work on the planet. Currently, ethnography is assuming a growing importance in the marketer’s effort to influence the accommodation and resistance of consumers to the neocolonial forces of globalization. (...)
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  46. Richard Wilkins & Karen Wolf (2012). The Role of Ethnography in Rhetorical Analysis: The New Rhetorical Turn. Empedocles 3 (1):7-23.score: 9.0
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  47. Andrew Young (2002). Ethnography and Bioethics: Boat Repair at Sea. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (1):91-93.score: 9.0
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  48. Barbara Frankel & Pnina Abir-Am (1992). Historical Ethnography as a Way of Knowing (with Response). Social Epistemology 6 (4):355 – 364.score: 9.0
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  49. Kenneth Gergen & Pnina Abir-Am (1992). Construction, Alienation and Emancipation: Thoughts on Abir-Am's Ethnography of Scientific Rituals (with Response). Social Epistemology 6 (4):365 – 372.score: 9.0
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