Search results for 'Ethnology Authorship' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Olaf Zenker & Karsten Kumoll (eds.) (2010). Beyond Writing Culture: Current Intersections of Epistemologies and Representational Practices. Berghahn Books.score: 60.0
    Two decades after the publication of Clifford and Marcus' volume Writing Culture, this collection provides a fresh and diverse reassessment of the debates that ...
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  2. Micaela Di Leonardo (1998). Exotics at Home: Anthropologies, Others, American Modernity. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    In this pathbreaking study, Micaela di Leonardo reveals the face of power within the mask of cultural difference. From the 1893 World's Fair to Body Shop advertisements, di Leonardo focuses on the intimate and shifting relations between popular portrayals of exotic Others and the practice of anthropology. In so doing, she casts new light on gender, race, and the public sphere in America's past and present. "An impressive work of scholarship that is mordantly witty, passionately argued, and takes no prisoners."--Lesley (...)
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  3. Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.) (1997). After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Anthropologists now openly acknowledge that social anthropology can no longer fulfill its traditional aim of providing holistic, objective representations of people of "exotic" cultures. After Writing Culture asks what theoretical and practical role contemporary anthropology can play in our increasingly unpredictable and complex world. With fourteen articles written by well-known anthropologists, the work explores some of the directions in which contemporary anthropology is moving, following the questions raised by the "writing culture" debates of the 1980s. Some of the chapters cover: (...)
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  4. Nigel Rapport (1997). Transcendent Individual: Towards a Literary and Liberal Anthropology. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Transcendent Individual is an anthropological account of individual creativity and its conscious engagement in society. Drawing widely on ethnographic and theoretic material, and bringing into debate a range of voices--Nietzsche, Wilde and Forster, Bateson and Gerald Edelman, George Steiner, Richard Rorty and John Berger, Edmund Leach and Anthony Cohen--the book approaches individuality in terms of a range of issues: biological integrity, consciousness, agency, democracy, discourse, knowledge, consumerism, globalism and play.
     
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  5. On Authorship, Collaboration Paisley Livingston, Paraphrasing Poetry & Somatic Style (2011). Index: Volume 69. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4).score: 30.0
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  6. Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome (2009). A Role for Ownership and Authorship in the Analysis of Thought Insertion. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):205-224.score: 24.0
    Philosophers are interested in the phenomenon of thought insertion because it challenges the common assumption that one can ascribe to oneself the thoughts that one can access first-personally. In the standard philosophical analysis of thought insertion, the subject owns the ‘inserted’ thought but lacks a sense of agency towards it. In this paper we want to provide an alternative analysis of the condition, according to which subjects typically lack both ownership and authorship of the ‘inserted’ thoughts. We argue that (...)
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  7. Christy Mag Uidhir (2012). Comics & Collective Authorship. In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 24.0
    Most mass-art comics (e.g., “superhero” comics) are collectively produced, that is, different people are responsible for different production elements. As such, the more disparate comic production roles we begin to regard as significantly or uniquely contributory, the more difficult questions of comic authorship become, and the more we view various distinct production roles as potentially constitutive is the more we must view comic authorship as potentially collective authorship. Given the general unreliability of intuitions with respect to collective (...)
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  8. Christy Mag Uidhir (2011). Minimal Authorship (of Sorts). Philosophical Studies 154 (3):373-387.score: 24.0
    I propose a minimal account of authorship that specifies the fundamental nature of the author-relation and its minimal domain composition in terms of a three-place causal-intentional relation holding between agents and sort-relative works. I contrast my account with the minimal account tacitly held by most authorship theories, which is a two-place relation holding between agents and works simpliciter. I claim that only my view can ground productive and informative principled distinctions between collective production and collective authorship.
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  9. David Shaw (2011). The Authorless Paper: The ICMJE’s Definition of Authorship is Illogical and Unethical. British Medical Journal 343 (7831):999.score: 24.0
    In recent years there have been many revelations about ghost authors, who contribute to publications but are not credited, and guest authors, who do not contribute but are credited. Most medical and many other journals adhere to the authorship standards set by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), which were designed in part to combat the phenomena of ghost and guest authorship. However, the current criteria set for authorship by the ICMJE have their own problems. (...)
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  10. Corrine R. Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.score: 24.0
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. Faculty and (...)
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  11. Anne Hudson Jones (2003). Can Authorship Policies Help Prevent Scientific Misconduct? What Role for Scientific Societies? Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):243-256.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this article is to encourage and help inform active discussion of authorship policies among members of scientific societies. The article explains the history and rationale of the influential criteria for authorship developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, examines questions about those criteria that emerge from authorship policies adopted by several U.S. medical schools, and summarizes the arguments for replacing authorship with the contributorguarantor model. Finally, it concludes with a plea for (...)
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  12. Mary Rose & Karla Fischer (1995). Policies and Perspectives on Authorship. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (4):361-370.score: 24.0
    Authorship on publications has been described as a “meal ticket” for researchers in academic settings. Given the importance of authorship, inappropriate publication credit is a pertinent ethical issue. This paper presents an overview of authorship problems and policies intended to address them. Previous work has identified three types of inappropriate authorship practices: plagiarism, giving unwarranted credit and failure to give expected credit. Guidelines from universities, journals and professional organizations provide standards about requirements of authors and may (...)
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  13. Elise Smith & Bryn Williams-Jones (2012). Authorship and Responsibility in Health Sciences Research: A Review of Procedures for Fairly Allocating Authorship in Multi-Author Studies. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):199-212.score: 24.0
    While there has been significant discussion in the health sciences and ethics literatures about problems associated with publication practices (e.g., ghost- and gift-authorship, conflicts of interest), there has been relatively little practical guidance developed to help researchers determine how they should fairly allocate credit for multi-authored publications. Fair allocation of credit requires that participating authors be acknowledged for their contribution and responsibilities, but it is not obvious what contributions should warrant authorship, nor who should be responsible for the (...)
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  14. Darko Hren, Dario Sambunjak, Matko Marušić & Ana Marušić (2013). Medical Students' Decisions About Authorship in Disputable Situations: Intervention Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):641-651.score: 24.0
    In medicine, professional behavior and ethics are often rule-based. We assessed whether instruction on formal criteria of authorship affected the decision of students about authorship dilemmas and whether they perceive authorship as a conventional or moral concept. A prospective non-randomized intervention study involved 203s year medical students who did (n = 107) or did not (n = 96) received a lecture on International Committee of Medical Journal editors (ICMJE) authorship criteria. Both groups had to read 3 (...)
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  15. Eugen Tarnow (1999). The Authorship List in Science: Junior Physicists' Perceptions of Who Appears and Why. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (1):73-88.score: 24.0
    A questionnaire probing the distribution of authorship credit was given to postdoctoral associates (“postdocs”) in order to determine their awareness of the professional society’s ethical statement on authorship, the extent of communication with their supervisors about authorship criteria, and the appropriateness of authorship assignments on submitted papers. Results indicate a low awareness of the professional society’s ethical statement and that little communication takes place between postdocs and supervisors about authorship criteria. A substantial amount of (...) credit given to supervisors and other workers is perceived by the postdocs to violate the professional society’s ethical statement. (shrink)
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  16. Laura Welfare & Corrine Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.score: 24.0
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. Faculty and (...)
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  17. Jennifer Duke-Yonge (2013). Ownership, Authorship and External Justification. Acta Analytica 28 (2):237-252.score: 24.0
    Some of the most well-known arguments against epistemic externalism come in the form of thought experiments involving subjects who acquire beliefs through anomolous means such as clairvoyance. These thought experiments purport to provide counterexamples to the reliabilist conception of justification: their subjects are intuitively epistemically unjustified, yet meet reliabilist externalist criteria for justification. In this article, I address a recent defence of externalism due to Daniel Breyer, who argues that externalists need not consider such subjects justified, since they fail to (...)
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  18. Barton Moffatt (2011). Responsible Authorship: Why Researchers Must Forgo Honorary Authorship. Accountability in Research 18 (2):76-90.score: 24.0
    Although widespread throughout the biomedical sciences, the practice of honorary authorship—the listing of authors who fail to merit inclusion as authors by authorship criteria—has received relatively little sustained attention. Is there something wrong with honorary authorship, or is it only a problem when used in conjunction with other unethical authorship practices like ghostwriting? Numerous sets of authorship guidelines discourage the practice, but its ubiquity throughout biomedicine suggests that there is a need to say more about (...)
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  19. Muriel Bebeau & Verna Monson (2011). Authorship and Publication Practices in the Social Sciences: Historical Reflections on Current Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):365-388.score: 24.0
    An historical review of authorship definitions and publication practices that are embedded in directions to authors and in the codes of ethics in the fields of psychology, sociology, and education illuminates reasonable agreement and consistency across the fields with regard to (a) originality of the work submitted, (b) data sharing, (c) human participants’ protection, and (d) conflict of interest disclosure. However, the role of the professional association in addressing violations of research or publication practices varies among these fields. Psychology (...)
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  20. Alex Michalos (2010). Observations on Unacknowledged Authorship From Homer to Now. Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):253-258.score: 24.0
    In this essay brief sketches of three historical cases of unacknowledged authorship are offered to remind readers that unacknowledged authorship has been and still may be viewed in different ways given different contexts and purposes. Reflecting on these cases and many others that come to mind, it seems that the contemporary scene concerning unacknowledged authorship does not indicate a huge deterioration of research or publishing integrity. Following the brief historical journey, overviews of two contemporary cases are presented (...)
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  21. Jason Borenstein (2011). Responsible Authorship in Engineering Fields: An Overview of Current Ethical Challenges. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):355-364.score: 24.0
    The primary aim of this article is to identify ethical challenges relating to authorship in engineering fields. Professional organizations and journals do provide crucial guidance in this realm, but this cannot replace the need for frequent and diligent discussions in engineering research communities about what constitutes appropriate authorship practice. Engineering researchers should seek to identify and address issues such as who is entitled to be an author and whether publishing their research could potentially harm the public.
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  22. T. Prabhakar Clement (2014). Authorship Matrix: A Rational Approach to Quantify Individual Contributions and Responsibilities in Multi-Author Scientific Articles. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):345-361.score: 24.0
    We propose a rational method for addressing an important question—who deserves to be an author of a scientific article? We review various contentious issues associated with this question and recommend that the scientific community should view authorship in terms of contributions and responsibilities, rather than credits. We propose a new paradigm that conceptually divides a scientific article into four basic elements: ideas, work, writing, and stewardship. We employ these four fundamental elements to modify the well-known International Committee of Medical (...)
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  23. Michael Kalichman (2011). Overview: Underserved Areas of Education in the Responsible Conduct of Research: Authorship. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):335-339.score: 24.0
    In February of 2007, the Responsible Conduct of Research Education Committee of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics convened a mini-conference at the Association’s annual meeting. The purpose of the mini-conference was to examine underserved areas of education in research ethics. The mini-conference consisted of panel discussions for two topics: authorship and social responsibility. Representatives from diverse academic disciplines were invited to participate in each of the two panels. This Special Section of Science and Engineering Ethics consists of (...)
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  24. Francis Macrina (2011). Teaching Authorship and Publication Practices in the Biomedical and Life Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):341-354.score: 24.0
    Examination of a limited number of publisher’s Instructions for Authors, guidelines from two scientific societies, and the widely accepted policy document of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) provided useful information on authorship practices. Three of five journals examined (Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) publish papers across a variety of disciplines. One is broadly focused on topics in medical research (New England Journal of Medicine) and one publishes research reports in a (...)
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  25. Matko Marušić, Jadranka Božikov, Vedran Katavić, Darko Hren, Marko Kljaković-Gašpić & Ana Marušić (2004). Authorship in a Small Medical Journal: A Study of Contributorship Statements by Corresponding Authors. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):493-502.score: 24.0
    The authorship criteria of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) are widely accepted in biomedical journals, but many studies in large and prestigious journals show that a considerable proportion of authors do not fulfill these criteria. We investigated authorship contributions in a small medical journal outside the scientific mainstream, to see if poor adherence to authorship criteria is common in biomedical journals. We analyzed statements on research contribution, as checked by the corresponding author, for individual (...)
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  26. Dena Plemmons (2011). A Broader Discussion of Authorship. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):389-398.score: 24.0
    While it may be useful to consider the development of new topics in teaching the responsible conduct of research (RCR), it is perhaps equally important to reconsider the traditionally taught core topic areas in both more nuanced and broader ways. This paper takes the topic of authorship as an example. Through the description of two specific cases from sociocultural anthropology, ideas about credit and responsibility are examined. It is suggested that placing more focus on the array of meanings found (...)
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  27. Magne Nylenna, Frode Fagerbakk & Peter Kierulf (2014). Authorship: Attitudes and Practice Among Norwegian Researchers. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):53.score: 24.0
    Attitudes to, and practices of, scientific authorship vary. We have studied this variation among researchers in a university hospital and medical school in Norway.
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  28. Jesús Zamora Bonilla (2012). The Nature of Co-Authorship: A Note on Recognition Sharing and Scientific Argumentation. Synthese (1):1-12.score: 24.0
    Co-authorship of papers is very common in most areas of science, and it has increased as the complexity of research has strengthened the need for scientific collaboration. But the fact that papers have more than an author tends to complicate the attribution of merit to individual scientists. I argue that collaboration does not necessarily entail co-authorship, but that in many cases the latter is an option that individual authors might not choose, at least in principle: each author might (...)
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  29. Flora Colledge, Bernice Elger & David Shaw (2013). “Conferring Authorship”: Biobank Stakeholders’ Experiences with Publication Credit in Collaborative Research. PLoS ONE 8:e76686.score: 24.0
    Background: Multi-collaborator research is increasingly becoming the norm in the field of biomedicine. With this trend comes the imperative to award recognition to all those who contribute to a study; however, there is a gap in the current “gold standard” in authorship guidelines with regards to the efforts of those who provide high quality biosamples and data, yet do not play a role in the intellectual development of the final publication. -/- Methods and findings: We carried out interviews with (...)
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  30. Thomas Erren, Michael Erren & David Shaw (2013). Peer Reviewers Can Meet Journals’ Criteria for Authorship. British Medical Journal 346:f166.score: 24.0
    This article argues that some reviewers contribute more to research than many authors, and suggests that reviewers meet the ICMJE criteria for authorship in many cases.
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  31. Mahsa Izadinia (forthcoming). Authorship: The Hidden Voices of Postgraduate TEFL Students in Iran. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-15.score: 24.0
    Although an author is defined as someone who has made substantial contributions to a research study, sometimes power relations in student-supervisor collaborations play a more determining role in attribution of authorship. This article reflects the ideas of eight Iranian postgraduate Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) students about authorship policies and practices at their universities. The interview data indicate that the participants were not involved in authorship decisions and authorship credits were given based on their (...)
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  32. Barton Moffatt (2013). Orphan Papers and Ghostwriting: The Case Against the ICMJE Criterion of Authorship. Accountability in Research 20 (2): 59-71.score: 24.0
    Although popular, I argue that the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) account of authorship is flawed. It inadvertently allows for practices that it was designed to prevent. In addition, it creates a new category of authorless papers—orphan papers. The original World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) criterion is preferable.
     
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  33. Elise Smith, Matthew Hunt & Zubin Master (2014). Authorship Ethics in Global Health Research Partnerships Between Researchers From Low or Middle Income Countries and High Income Countries. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):42.score: 24.0
    Over the past two decades, the promotion of collaborative partnerships involving researchers from low and middle income countries with those from high income countries has been a major development in global health research. Ideally, these partnerships would lead to more equitable collaboration including the sharing of research responsibilities and rewards. While collaborative partnership initiatives have shown promise and attracted growing interest, there has been little scholarly debate regarding the fair distribution of authorship credit within these partnerships.
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  34. Justin Solomon (2009). Programmers, Professors, and Parasites: Credit and Co-Authorship in Computer Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (4):467-489.score: 21.0
    This article presents an in-depth analysis of past and present publishing practices in academic computer science to suggest the establishment of a more consistent publishing standard. Historical precedent for academic publishing in computer science is established through the study of anecdotes as well as statistics collected from databases of published computer science papers. After examining these facts alongside information about analogous publishing situations and standards in other scientific fields, the article concludes with a list of basic principles that should be (...)
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  35. Derek P. Brereton (2010). Preface for a Critical Realist Ethnology, Part I: The Schism and a Realist Restorative. Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1):77-102.score: 21.0
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  36. Pascal Borry, Paul Schotsmans & Kris Dierickx (2006). Author, Contributor or Just a Signer? A Quantitative Analysis of Authorship Trends in the Field of Bioethics. Bioethics 20 (4):213–220.score: 21.0
  37. Daniel Berthold-Bond (2011). The Ethics of Authorship: Communication, Seduction, and Death in Hegel and Kierkegaard. Fordham University Press.score: 21.0
    Introduction : Rorschach tests -- A question of style -- Live or tell -- Kierkegaard's seductions -- Hegel's seductions -- Talking cures -- A penchant for disguise : the death (and rebirth) of the author in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche -- Passing over : the death of the author in Hegel -- Conclusion : the melancholy of having finished -- Aftersong : from low down.
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  38. Sean Burke (2008/2010). The Ethics of Writing: Authorship and Legacy in Plato and Nietzsche. Edinburgh University Press.score: 21.0
  39. G. J. Dorleijn, Ralf Grüttemeier & Liesbeth Korthals Altes (eds.) (2010). Authorship Revisited: Conceptions of Authorship Around 1900 and 2000. Peeters.score: 21.0
     
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  40. Paul Radin (1966). The Method and Theory of Ethnology. New York, Basic Books.score: 21.0
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  41. Sherri Irvin (2005). Appropriation and Authorship in Contemporary Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):123-137.score: 18.0
    Appropriation art has often been thought to support the view that authorship in art is an outmoded or misguided notion. Through a thought experiment comparing appropriation art to a unique case of artistic forgery, I examine and reject a number of candidates for the distinction that makes artists the authors of their work while forgers are not. The crucial difference is seen to lie in the fact that artists bear ultimate responsibility for whatever objectives they choose to pursue through (...)
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  42. Eddy Nahmias (2005). Agency, Authorship, and Illusion. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):771-785.score: 18.0
    Daniel Wegner argues that conscious will is an illusion. I examine the adequacy of his theory of apparent mental causation and whether, if accurate, it suggests that our experience of agency and authorship should be considered illusory. I examine various interpretations of this claim and raise problems for each interpretation. I also distinguish between the experiences of agency and authorship.
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  43. Antony Aumann (2011). The ‘Death of the Author’ in Hegel and Kierkegaard: On Berthold’s 'The Ethics of Authorship'. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 32 (2):435-447.score: 18.0
    In The Ethics of Authorship, Daniel Berthold depicts G. W. F. Hegel and Søren Kierkegaard as endorsing two postmodern principles. The first is an ethical ideal. Authors should abdicate their traditional privileged position as arbiters of their texts’ meaning. They should allow readers to determine this meaning for themselves. Only by doing so will they help readers attain genuine selfhood. The second principle is a claim about language. To wit, language cannot express an author’s thoughts. I argue that if (...)
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  44. Michael W. Hickson & Thomas M. Lennon (2009). The Real Significance of Bayle's Authorship of the Avis. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):191 – 205.score: 18.0
    Did Bayle write the Avis aux réfugiés? Although the long debate over this question might not be over, we are convinced that strong probability supports Gianluca Mori's position that Bayle was indeed its sole author. We are also convinced, however, that the significance that Mori assigns to Bayle's authorship gets it exactly the wrong way around, for while Mori is right that the Avis is not only consistent but also representative of the views espoused by Bayle in his subsequent (...)
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  45. Paisley Livingston (2008). Authorship Redux: On Some Recent and Not-so-Recent Work in Literary Theory. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 191-197.score: 18.0
    Did Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, or other "poststructuralist" theorists writing in the wake of May '68 come up with any good ideas about authorship and related topics in the philosophy of literature? The three volumes under review have a common point of departure in that broad question, but offer a number of contrasting responses to it. In what follows I describe and assess some of the various perspectives on offer in these 700 or so pages. The short (...)
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  46. Justine Pila (2009). Authorship and E-Science: Balancing Epistemological Trust and Skepticism in the Digital Environment. Social Epistemology 23 (1):1-24.score: 18.0
    In this essay I consider the role of authorship in balancing epistemological trust and skepticism in e-science. Drawing on studies of the diagnostic practices of doctors in British breast care units and the gate-keeping practices of a Californian publisher of (professional and amateur) horticultural works, I suggest that conventions of authorial designation have an important role to play in nurturing the skepticism essential for scientific rigor within the framework of epistemological trust that pragmatism and morality require. In (...)
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  47. Adina L. Roskies (2012). Don't Panic: Self-Authorship Without Obscure Metaphysics1. Philosophical Perspectives 26 (1):323-342.score: 18.0
    In this paper I attempt to respond to the worries of the source incompatibilist, and try to sketch a naturalistically plausible, compatibilist notion of self-authorship and control that I believe captures important aspects of the folk intuitions regarding freedom and responsibility. It is my hope to thus offer those moved by source incompatibilist worries a reason not to adopt what P.F. Strawson called “the obscure and panicky metaphysics of Libertarianism” (P. F. Strawson, 1982) or the panic-inducing moral austerity of (...)
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  48. Marcin Brocki (2003). Semiotics of Culture and New Polish Ethnology. Sign Systems Studies 31 (1):271-277.score: 18.0
    The paper deals with the contemporary state of semiotic ethnology in Poland (connected with New Polish Ethnology group), its internal and external influences, its specifics, subjects and its reaction to the other theoretical propositions. The “neotribe” of New Polish Ethnology was established by few younger scholars, ethnologists in the early 1980s, in an opposition to the dominant stream of positivistic ethnology. Today they have become classics of Polish anthropology, masters that have educated a new generation of (...)
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  49. J. Westfall (2012). Who is the Author of The Point of View? Issues of Authorship in the Posthumous Kierkegaard. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (6):569-589.score: 18.0
    Kierkegaard scholars have made much of Kierkegaard’s posthumously published The Point of View for My Work as an Author, and the work does seem to provide a key to interpreting Kierkegaard’s infamous authorial difficulties – not the least of which is the meaning of pseudonymity in his work. Considerations of the book’s authorship itself are, however, exceptionally rare. In this article, I open an inquiry into issues of authorship that arise within the work, both in terms of what (...)
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