Search results for 'Ethnomethodology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Lynch (1993). Scientific Practice and Ordinary Action: Ethnomethodology and Social Studies of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science have grown interested in the daily practices of scientists. Recent studies have drawn linkages between scientific innovations and more ordinary procedures, craft skills, and sources of sponsorship. These studies dispute the idea that science is the application of a unified method or the outgrowth of a progressive history of ideas. This book critically reviews arguments and empirical studies in two areas of sociology that have played a significant role in the 'sociological turn' in science (...)
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  2. Hideo Hama (1999). Ethnomethodology and the Rashomon Problem. Human Studies 22 (2-4):183-192.score: 18.0
    In his doctoral dissertation, Harold Garfinkel critically examined Talcott Parsons' classical formulation of the problem of order referred to as the Hobbesian problem. Garfinkel's criticism can be summarized under the following three headings: (1) common sense rationality replaces scientific rationality; (2) the level of the premises of conduct replaces the level of de facto action; (3) congruence theory replaces the correspondence theory. The aim of this paper is to make some observations on the structure of the problem of order which (...)
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  3. Louis Quéré (2012). Is There Any Good Reason to Say Goodbye to “Ethnomethodology”? Human Studies 35 (2):305-325.score: 18.0
    This paper is an essay about Harold Garfinkel's heritage. It outlines a response to Eric Livingston's proposal to say goodbye to ethnomethodology as pertaining to the sociological tradition; and it rejects part of Melvin Pollner's diagnosis about the changes occurred in ethnomethodological working. If it agrees with Pollner about the idea that something of the initial ethnomethodology's program has been left aside after the "work studies" turn, it asserts that such a turn has nonetheless made possible authentic discoveries. (...)
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  4. Thomas S. Eberle (2012). Phenomenological Life-World Analysis and Ethnomethodology's Program. Human Studies 35 (2):279-304.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses ethnomethodology's program in relation to the phenomenological life-world analysis of Alfred Schutz. A recent publication of Garfinkel's early writings sheds new light on how he made use of phenomenological reflections in order to create a new sociological approach. Garfinkel used Schutz's life-world analysis as a source of inspiration, called for 'misreading' in the sense of an alternate reading and developed a new, empirical approach to the analysis of social order which he called 'ethnomethodology'. Ethnomethodologists usually (...)
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  5. Nathan Emmerich (2013). For an Ethnomethodology of Healthcare Ethics. Health Care Analysis 21 (4):372-389.score: 18.0
    This paper considers the utility of Ethnomethodology (EM) for the study of healthcare ethics as part of the empirical turn in Bioethics. I give a brief introduction to EM through its respecification of sociology, the specific view on the social world this generates and EM's posture of ‘indifference’. I then take a number of EM concepts and articulate each in the context of an EM study of healthcare ethics in professional practice. Having given an overview of the relationship and (...)
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  6. Corin Braga (2010). Carlos Castaneda: The Uses and Abuses of Ethnomethodology and Emic Studies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (27):71-106.score: 18.0
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Carlos Castaneda’s books and his New Age shamanistic religion raise, beyond the controversy regarding the counterfeit character of his ethnographic narrative and charlatanism, several methodological problems. Educated within the emerging paradigm of emic studies and ethnomethodoly of the 1960s, Castaneda used it in order to set a very clever methodological (...)
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  7. Thomas Abrams (forthcoming). Flawed by Dasein? Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology, and the Personal Experience of Physiotherapy. Human Studies:1-16.score: 18.0
    This paper applies a hybrid Heideggerian-ethnomethodological approach to physiotherapy practice. Unlike previous studies written by and for practitioners, this paper uses my personal experience receiving physical therapy as its point of departure. By combining Heidegger’s [Being and time (trans: Stambaugh J). State University of New York Press, New York 1996] notion of the ‘ontological difference’ with Garfinkel’s (Studies in ethnomethodology, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs 1967) concept of ‘accountability,’ I argue that in physical therapy practice, both client and practitioner actively shape (...)
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  8. Rodney Watson (1998). Ethnomethodology, Consciousness and Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (2):202-223.score: 15.0
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  9. Mary F. Rogers (1983). Sociology, Ethnomethodology, and Experience: A Phenomenological Critique. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
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  10. Ilkka Arminen (2008). Scientific and "Radical" Ethnomethodology: From Incompatible Paradigms to Ethnomethodological Sociology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (2):167-191.score: 12.0
    Ethnomethodology has been torn between scientific and "radical" aspirations insofar as it moves discoursive practices from resources to the topic of the study. Scientific ethnomethodology, such as conversation analysis, studies discoursive praxis as its topic and resource. Standard scientific criteria are accepted to assess the merits of its findings. "Radical" ethnomethodology addresses mundane reasoning exclusively as its topic without recourse to standardized science. I will show that insofar as "radical" ethnomethodology succeeds in bracketing everyday resources, it (...)
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  11. Michael Lynch (1999). Silence in Context: Ethnomethodology and Social Theory. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (2-4):211-233.score: 12.0
    Ethnomethodologists (or at least many of them) have been reticent about their theoretical sources and methodological principles. It frequently falls to others to make such matters explicit. In this paper I discuss this silence about theory, but rather than entering the breach by specifying a set of implicit assumptions and principles, I suggest that the reticence is consistent with ethnomethodology's distinctive research 'program'. The main part of the paper describes the pedagogical exercises and forms of apprenticeship through which Garfinkel (...)
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  12. Alex Dennis (2003). Skepticist Philosophy as Ethnomethodology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (2):151-173.score: 12.0
    Ethnomethodology is in trouble, its conceptual apparatus prone to indifference or misunderstanding both from "conventional" sociologists and from its own practitioners. This article describes some of these loci of confusion and suggests that they have a common root in the relationship between ethnomethodology and conventional sociology. Ethnomethodologists' desire to find a principled theoretical framework for dealing with this relationship is shown to be the common basis for subsequent confusion, and some of the corollaries of their putative solution(s) are (...)
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  13. Paul Ten Have (1995). Medical Ethnomethodology: An Overview. [REVIEW] Human Studies 18 (2-3):245 - 261.score: 12.0
    This paper gives a selective overview of studies in medical ethnomethodology. It starts with the 1967 contributions by Garfinkel and Sudnow, which focus on medical action as accountable Then it discusses the many CA-inspired studies of doctor-patient interaction published during the 1980s. Finally, it points to scattered studies that suggest several ways in which this latter approach can be deepened and enlarged. In this way, it formulates the contours of a program for ethnomethodological studies in the medical field.
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  14. Giolo Fele (2008). The Phenomenal Field: Ethnomethodological Perspectives on Collective Phenomena. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (3):299 - 322.score: 12.0
    The aim of my paper is twofold. First, I show how the notion of phenomenal field can be used to examine, describe and understand particular collective patterns pertaining to the everyday domain of our common social experience. Secondly, I outline the role of the notion of “phenomenal field” in ethnomethodology. I briefly discuss Gurwitsch’s notion of functional meaning. After presenting the argument, I show “the locally achieved ordinariness of a common task”, that is the lining up of the player (...)
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  15. Tony Hak (1995). Ethnomethodology and the Institutional Context. Human Studies 18 (2-3):109 - 137.score: 12.0
    Ethnomethodological studies of work attempt to examine ordinary activities for the ways in which they exhibit observably and accountably competent work practice as viewed by practitioners. Because it is the analyst's task to describe activities as viewed by practitioners,qua practitioners, two methodical problems must be solved. The first problem is how the analyst can know and describe the members' point of view. Because members display their point of view to each other, the problem can be formulated as the question of (...)
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  16. Alec McHoul (1998). How Can Ethnomethodology Be Heideggerian? Human Studies 21 (1):13-26.score: 12.0
    The purpose of this paper is to begin to try to understand the extent to which ethnomethodology (EM) might be informed by some concepts and ideas from the work of the philosopher Martin Heidegger. This is done in two parts. The first looks at Heidegger's later work and compares his conception of the ontological difference with Garfinkel's work on the difference between EM and formal sociological analysis (FA). The second part turns to Heidegger's earlier work (around Being and Time) (...)
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  17. Dimitri Ginev (2013). Ethnomethodological and Hermeneutic-Phenomenological Perspectives on Scientific Practices. Human Studies 36 (2):277-305.score: 12.0
    The paper presents a comparative analysis between hermeneutics and ethnomethodology of science. A careful examination of the approaches suggested by the two programs not only demonstrates that a non-essentialist inquiry of scientific practices is possible, it also reveals how the significant methodological differences between these (post-phenomenological) programs inform divergent pictures of science’s practical rationality. The role these programs play in the debates on science’s cognitive autonomy is illuminated by spelling out the idea of the internal criticism of scientific research (...)
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  18. Sandro Segre (2004). Ethnomethodology in Italy. Sociological Theory 22 (4):647-661.score: 12.0
    This article provides an overview on works that have come out in Italy in the field of ethnomethodology. General introductory works are considered first, with reference to their similarities and differences. Subsequently, the interpretations and discussions concerning the ethnomethodological perspective are briefly presented, and the limited amount of empirical investigations on ethnomethodological questions is mentioned. Garfinkel's ethnomethodology has been the object of a few specific introductory and interpretative contributions. The relationship between ethnomethodology and sociolinguistics has been a (...)
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  19. Eric Laurier (2004). The Spectacular Showing: Houdini and the Wonder of Ethnomethodology. [REVIEW] Human Studies 27 (4):377 - 399.score: 12.0
    This essay is about Houdini’s escapes and ethnomethodology’s studies.1 By accomplishing what appears to be impossible, Houdini leaves his audience considering not only how did he manage to do that, but also just what is it that we consider to be possible. Magicians and escapologists warn us off an interest in the mechanics of their tricks that might spoil the thrill of what they dramatically present to us: a sense of the limits to whatwe can apprehend as an audience. (...)
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  20. Timothy Koschmann (2012). Early Glimmers of the Now Familiar Ethnomethodological Themes in Garfinkel's “The Perception of the Other”. Human Studies 35 (4):479-504.score: 12.0
    Garfinkel's dissertation, "The Perception of the Other," was completed and defended 15 years prior to the publication of Studies in Ethnomethodology. This essay seeks hints of the familiar ethnomethodological themes (indexicality, reflexivity, accountability) within his thesis. It begins by examining the contributions of earlier social theorists, particularly Talcott Parsons and Alfred Schütz, to Garfinkel's thought. It then examines the dissertation itself seeking evidence to support the claim that Garfinkel was already moving in the direction of an 'incommensurable, asymmetric, and (...)
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  21. Chiara Bassetti (forthcoming). Kenneth Liberman: More Studies in Ethnomethodology. Human Studies:1-6.score: 12.0
    I shall confess since the beginning that I have fallen in love with this book. Reasons are as varied as its merits. First, it actually constitutes what the title promises: “More Studies in Ethnomethodology”. This is not just because of the (seemingly out of a novel) Foreword by Harold Garfinkel and the life-time collaboration of which the latter and the book itself testify between the founder of Ethnomethodology and one of his students, Kenneth Liberman—by now Professor Emeritus with (...)
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  22. John Manzo (2010). Coffee, Connoisseurship, and an Ethnomethodologically-Informed Sociology of Taste. Human Studies 33 (2):141-155.score: 10.0
    Coffee is an important commodity and an important comestible, one that is momentous not only for nations’ economies but also, at the micro-social level, as a resource for interpersonal sociability. Among a subculture of certain coffee connoisseurs, the coffee itself is a topic that is an organizing focus of, and for, that sociability. This paper is an empirical investigation of online narratives produced by hobbyist participants in what coffee aficionados refer to as the third wave coffee phenomenon and engages and (...)
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  23. Eric Livingston (1986). The Ethnomethodological Foundations of Mathematics. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 10.0
    A Non-Technical Introduction to Ethnomethodological Investigations of the Foundations of Mathematics through the Use of a Theorem of Euclidean Geometry* I ...
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  24. Dieter Misgeld (1980). Ultimate Self-Responsibility, Practical Reasoning, and Practical Action: Habermas, Husserl, and Ethnomethodology on Discourse and Action. [REVIEW] Human Studies 3 (1):255 - 278.score: 10.0
    A particular notion of reason has pervaded studies of practical action throughout the whole tradition of western philosophy up to Wittgenstein and Heidegger. This notion has been centrally located in contexts other than the specific study of practical action itself.This essay examines the relation of reason and practical action by reviewing Habermas' and Husserl's theories of the relation between discourse and action (I), and then proposing Garfinkel's ethnomethodological studies of practical action as an alternative to Husserl's and Habermas' preoccupation with (...)
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  25. Maria T. Wowk & Andrew P. Carlin (2004). Depicting a Liminal Position in Ethnomethodology, Conversation Analysis and Membership Categorization Analysis: The Work of Rod Watson. Human Studies 27 (1):69-89.score: 10.0
    This paper provides a provisional examination of Rod Watson''s work and contributions to EM/CA/MCA, in part through a critique of misrepresentations of his arguments in secondary accounts of his work. The form of these misrepresentations includes adumbration and traducement of his arguments. Focusing on the reflexivity of category and sequence and turn-generated categories, we suggest that his analytic position within ethnomethodological fields is unique and remarkable, yet largely unacknowledged. We argue that a re-examination of the body of Watson''s (...)
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  26. Brandon Olszewski, Deborah Macey & Lauren Lindstrom (2006). The Practical Work of : An Ethnomethodological Inquiry. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (3):363 - 380.score: 10.0
    While previous methodological studies have suggested that coding is a useful technique for analyzing qualitative data, there is a stark lack of discussion about the incongruities that inevitably arise as researchers accomplish the actual work of coding. This article explores the complexities of the coding process, and how incongruities get resolved as researchers accomplish the practical work of coding. Three primary themes emerged from this study: , , and . These three activities (...)
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  27. Kieran Bonner (2010). Peter McHugh and Analysis: The One and the Many, the Universal and the Particular, the Whole and the Part. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (2):253-269.score: 9.0
    This paper takes the passing of Peter McHugh as an occasion to examine the intellectual development of his work. The paper is mainly focused on the product of his collaboration with his colleague and friend, Alan Blum. As such, it addresses the tradition of social inquiry, Analysis, which they cofounded. It traces the influence of Harold Garfinkel’s Ethnomethodology on McHugh and on the beginning of Analysis. The collaboration with Blum is examined through a variety of coauthored works but most (...)
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  28. Michael Lynch (2002). Ethnomethodology's Unofficial Journal. Human Studies 25 (4):485-494.score: 9.0
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  29. P. J. J. Phillips (2011). Book Review: Phil Hutchinson, Rupert Read, and Wes Sharrock: There is No Such Thing as a Social Science: In Defence of Peter Winch. Directions in Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Farnham, UK: Ashgate Press, 2008. 156 Pp. {Pound}50.00 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (2):295-297.score: 9.0
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  30. Kieran M. Bonner (2001). Reflexivity and Interpretive Sociology: The Case of Analysis and the Problem of Nihilism. [REVIEW] Human Studies 24 (4):267-292.score: 9.0
    This paper addresses the problem of reflexivity in modern social inquiry in general and in sociology in particular. This problem is inherited from Weber''s very conception of sociology, is transformed by phenomenology and ethnomethodology, deepened by the linguistic turn of hermeneutics and Wittgenstein''s later philosophy, and has been the central concern of the work of Alan Blum and Peter McHugh. The issues and spectres raised by reflexivity are methodological arbitrariness, the need to take responsibility for one''s own talk (and (...)
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  31. Yaroslav Komarovski (2009). Review of Kenneth Liberman, Dialectical Practice in Tibetan Philosophical Culture: An Ethnomethodological Inquiry Into Formal Reasoning. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):513-515.score: 9.0
    Chapters 4–9 are the most important part of the book. Here Liberman displays his interpretive skills to the fullest. He explores various aspects of directly observed, live debate processes, drawing on the work of Schutz, Husserl, Durkheim (to mention just a few), as well as Buddhist thinkers Nagarjuna, Sakya Pandita, Tsongkhapa, and others. Liberman exhaustively explains the organization and mechanics of debates, the public nature of reasoning, negative dialectics employed by debaters, strategies and techniques such as absurd consequences, hand-claps, ridicule, (...)
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  32. David Goode (2003). Ethnomethodology and Disability Studies: A Reflection on Robillard. [REVIEW] Human Studies 26 (4):493-503.score: 9.0
  33. Michael Lynch (1997). Ethnomethodology Without Indifference. [REVIEW] Human Studies 20 (3):371-376.score: 9.0
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  34. T. J. Berard (2003). Ethnomethodology as Radical Sociology: An Expansive Appreciation of Melvin Pollner's 'Constitutive and Mundane Versions of Labeling Theory'. [REVIEW] Human Studies 26 (4):431-448.score: 9.0
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  35. James L. Heap (1980). Description in Ethnomethodology. Human Studies 3 (1):87 - 106.score: 9.0
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  36. Kevin McKenzie (2011). Structure and Agency in Scholarly Formulations of Racism. Human Studies 34 (1):67-92.score: 9.0
    That the issue of racism is a pressing social concern which requires serious and detailed attention is, for ethnomethodology, not a first principle from which its own inquiry is launched but rather a matter to be considered in light of how mundane actors (both professional and lay) treat that very topic. This paper explores how the assumption of an ontological distinction between social structure and individual agency is integral to the intelligibility of racism as formulated in scholarly accounts. In (...)
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  37. Patrick Colfer (2010). Peter McHugh: A Memoir of the Passion of Theorizing. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (2):281-286.score: 9.0
    This paper is a personal and theoretic commemoration of Peter McHugh’s life and commitment through the prism of the writer’s discovery of, and involvement in, the effort from the late 1960s to diagnose and respond to the failure of positivism in sociology. Peter’s work (with that of Alan Blum) formed a central component of that effort. I trace the genealogy of Peter’s teaching and conversational practice, to his roots in ethnomethodology and his involvement with Harold Garfinkel. This is followed (...)
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  38. James L. Heap (1990). Applied Ethnomethodology: Looking for the Local Rationality of Reading Activities. [REVIEW] Human Studies 13 (1):39 - 72.score: 9.0
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  39. Ernest Gellner (1975). Ethnomethodology: The Re-Enchantment Industry or the Californian Way of Subjectivity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (3):431-450.score: 9.0
  40. Baudouin Dupret (2011). Adjudication in Action: An Ethnomethodology of Law, Morality and Justice. Ashgate.score: 9.0
    Law and morality : constructs and models -- The morality of cognition : the normativity of ordinary reasoning -- Law in action : a praxeological approach to law and justice -- Law in context : legal activity and the institutional context -- Procedural constraint : sequentiality, routine, and formal correctness -- Legal relevance : the production of factuality and legality -- From law in the books to law in action : egyptian criminal law between doctrine, case law, jurisprudence, and practice (...)
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  41. Douglas W. Maynard (2011). On “Interactional Semantics” and Problems of Meaning. Human Studies 34 (2):199-207.score: 9.0
    This article is a comment on papers being published in this special issue concerned with interactional semantics. As these papers are concerned with abstractions, formulations, generalizations, and other uses of categorizations whereby participants’ everyday understandings and interpretations come to the foreground of analysis, I explore the wider issue with which the papers wrestle. That issue is whether problems of meaning—related to subjectivity, intersubjectivity, mutual comprehension, and the like—are pervasive in interaction, or are limited and situational. I examine problems of meaning (...)
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  42. A. W. Mchoul (1981). Ethnomethodology and the Position of Relativist Discourse. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 11 (2):107–124.score: 9.0
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  43. William Rehg (2005). Ideals of Argumentative Process and the Ethnomethodology of Scientific Work. Symposium 9 (2):313-337.score: 9.0
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  44. Hugh Mehan & Houston Wood (1975). An Image of Man for Ethnomethodology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (3):365-376.score: 9.0
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  45. Michael Lynch (2012). Revisiting the Cultural Dope. Human Studies 35 (2):223-233.score: 9.0
    This essay focuses on the "cultural dope," an ironic reference in Harold Garfinkel's Studies in Ethnomethodology to the rule-following actor in conventional sociological theories. In the nearly half-century since the publication of that book, the "cultural dope" has been incorporated into numerous criticisms of "models of man" in the human sciences. Garfinkel's account appeals to many writers because it seems to present an alternative picture of the actor: an individual who is self-aware, reflective, and skilled in the conduct of (...)
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  46. Lucia Ruggerone (2013). Science and Life-World: Husserl, Schutz, Garfinkel. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (2):179-197.score: 9.0
    In this article I intend to explore the conception of science as it emerges from the work of Husserl, Schutz, and Garfinkel. By concentrating specifically on the issue of science, I attempt to show that Garfinkel’s views on the relationship between science and the everyday world are much closer to Husserl’s stance than to the Schutzian perspective. To this end, I explore Husserl’s notion of science especially as it emerges in the Crisis of European Sciences, where he describes the failure (...)
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  47. Lorenza Mondada (forthcoming). Ethics in Action: Anonymization as a Participant's Concern and a Participant's Practice. [REVIEW] Human Studies:1-31.score: 9.0
    Ethical issues are often discussed in a normative, prescriptive, generic way, within methodological recommendations and ethical guidelines. Within social sciences dealing with social interaction, these ethical issues concern the approach of participants during fieldwork, the recordings of audio–video data, their transcription, and their analysis. This paper offers a respecification (in an ethnomethodological sense) of these issues by addressing them in a double perspective: as a topic for research—and not just as a methodological resource—; as a members’ concern and not as (...)
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  48. Mauro Turrini (2012). Continuous Grey Scales Versus Sharp Contrasts: Styles of Representation in Italian Clinical Cytogenetics Laboratories. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (1):1-25.score: 9.0
    In some circumstances, scientists of the same discipline visualize and view differently the same scientific object. The question of representational difference , which has usually been connected to scientific revolutions or controversies, is framed here using the concept of “style,” addressing the plurality of scientific traditions within a well-established scientific field. Using ethnomethodology we will examine the divergences of representational practices that, beyond the apparent consensus of a scientific community, are present throughout the procedure of chromosomes preparation. The ethnographic (...)
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  49. Peter Freund & Mona Abrams (1976). Ethnomethodology and Marxism: Their Use for Critical Theorizing. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 3 (3):377-393.score: 9.0
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  50. Daniel J. O'keefe (1979). Ethnomethodology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 9 (2):187–219.score: 9.0
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