Search results for 'Ethnoscience' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David B. Kronenfeld (1996). Plastic Glasses and Church Fathers: Semantic Extension From the Ethnoscience Tradition. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Meaning seems to shift from context to context; how do we know when someone says "grab a chair" that an ottoman or orange crate will do, but when someone says "let's buy a chair," they won't? In Plastic Glasses and Church Fathers, Kronenfeld offers a theory that explains both the usefulness of language's variability of reference and the mechanisms which enable us to understand each other in spite of the variability. Kronenfeld's theory, rooted in the tradition of ethnoscience (or (...)
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  2. Ubiratan D'Ambrosio (1985). A Methodology for Ethnoscience: The Need for Alternative Epistemologies. Theoria 1 (2):397-409.score: 18.0
    In this paper it is assumed a broad conceptualization of Science which allows far looking into common practices which are apparently unstructured forms of knowledge. This result from a concept of culture which is the result of an hierarchization of behavior. In this theoretical framewark the concept of ethnoscience is analysed.
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  3. Ron Amundson (1982). Science, Ethnoscience, and Ethnocentrism. Philosophy of Science 49 (2):236-250.score: 15.0
    The conventionalist epistemology of cultural anthropology can be seen to be embedded in the methods of 'cognitive anthropology', the study of folk conceptual systems. These methods result in indiscriminately depicting all folk systems as conventional, whether or not the systems are intended by the native to represent objective features of the world. Hypothetical and actual ethnographic situations are discussed. It is concluded that the anthropologist's projection of his/her own epistemology onto a native system is ethnocentric. This epistemological prejudice may be (...)
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  4. Michael Adler (2005). Collaborative Knowledge : Carrying Forward Richard Ford's Legacy of Integrative Ethnoscience in the American Southwest. In Michelle Hegmon, B. Sunday Eiselt & Richard I. Ford (eds.), Engaged Anthropology: Research Essays on North American Archaeology, Ethnobotany, and Museology. University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology.score: 15.0
     
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  5. F. Aubaille-Sallenave (1993). Les collections des naturalistes orientalistes comme source de connaissances pour l'ethnoscience arabe. Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 14 (1):89-108.score: 15.0
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  6. Françoise Aubaile Sallenave (1993). Les collections des naturalistes orientalistes comme source de connaissances pour l'ethnoscience arabe. Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 14 (1):89-108.score: 15.0
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  7. Oswald Werner (1969). The Basic Assumptions of Ethnoscience. Semiotica 1 (3).score: 15.0
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  8. Michael C. Kirwen (ed.) (2005). African Cultural Knowledge: Themes and Embedded Beliefs. Mias Books.score: 6.0
  9. Paul Potter (1991). Françoise Skoda: Médecine Ancienne Et Métaphore: Le Vocabulaire de l'Anatomie Et de la Pathologie En Grec Ancien. (Collection 'Ethnosciences', 4.) Pp. Xxiv + 341. Paris: Peeters/Selaf, 1988. Paper, Frs. 1,200. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):269-270.score: 5.0
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  10. Laura Nader (ed.) (1996). Naked Science: Anthropological Inquiry Into Boundaries, Power, and Knowledge. Routledge.score: 3.0
    Naked Science is about contested domains and includes different science cultures: physics, molecular biology, primatology, immunology, ecology, medical environmental, mathematical and navigational domains. While the volume rests on the assumption that science is not autonomous, the book is distinguished by its global perspective. Examining knowledge systems within a planetary frame forces thinking about boundaries that silence or affect knowledge-building. Consideration of ethnoscience and technoscience research within a common framework is overdue for raising questions about deeply held beliefs and assumptions (...)
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  11. Dianne E. Rocheleau (1991). Gender, Ecology, and the Science of Survival: Stories and Lessons From Kenya. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):156-165.score: 3.0
    Sustainable development and biodiversity initiatives increasingly include ethnoscience, yet the gendered nature of rural people's knowledge goes largely unrecognized. The paper notes the current resurgence of ethnoscience research and states the case for including gendered knowledge and skills, supported by a brief review of relevant cultural ecology and ecofeminist field studies. The author argues the case from the point of view of better, more complete science as well as from the ethical imperative to serve women's interests as the (...)
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  12. Constance M. McCorkle (1995). Back to the Future: Lessons From Ethnoveterinary RD&E for Studying and Applying Local Knowledge. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 12 (2):52-80.score: 3.0
    Ethnoveterinary research, development, and extension (ERD&E) has emerged as a rich field for discovering, adapting, and transferring appropriate and sustainable animal health technologies to rural and peri-urban stockraisers, especially in Third World countries. This field is defined as the holistic, interdisciplinary study of local knowledge and practices, together with the social structure in which they are embedded, that pertain to the healthcare and healthful husbandry of animals used for a multitude of purposes. Especially in the Third World, livestock play a (...)
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  13. Seán Ó Nualláin (2002). The Search for Mind: A New Foundation for Cognitive Science. Intellect.score: 3.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part 1 - The Constituent Disciplines of Cognitive Science -- Philosophical Epistemology -- Glossary -- 1.0 What is Philosophical Epistemology? -- 1.1 The reduced history of Philosophy Part I - The Classical Age -- 1.2 Mind and World - The problem of objectivity -- 1.3 The reduced history of Philosophy Part II - The twentieth century -- 1.4 The philosophy of Cognitive Science -- 1.5 Mind in Philosophy: summary -- 1.6 The Nolanian Framework (so far) -- (...)
     
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  14. Laurent Umans (1993). A Discourse on Forestry Science. Agriculture and Human Values 10 (4):26-40.score: 3.0
    Forestry science is firmly based on the ideas of rationalization, emancipation, and progress as embedded in the Modernity Project. Its emergence in the late Seventeenth century is primarily a rationalization of timber production, although to some extend attention is given to other functions of the forest. As an applied science, forestry was preoccupied with bio-technical and economic research. The development in forestry science during the last four decades is described as a broadening of this narrow rationalization concept. Social and ecological (...)
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  15. Sandra Harding (1992). After Eurocentrism: Challenges for the Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:311 - 319.score: 1.0
    Two themes in postcolonial science studies pose unusual challenges for philosophers of science. According to these accounts, the cognitive/technical core of Western sciences, not just their technologies, applications, and social institutions, is permeated by distinctive cultural and political commitments. In this sense, Western sciences are "ethnosciences." Moreover, these analysts want to delink their societies' scientific and technological projects from the West's in order to develop fully modern sciences within their own culturally distinctive scientific traditions. This paper suggests some fruitful ways (...)
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