Search results for 'Ethology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  20
    Daniel C. Dennett (1983). Intentional Systems in Cognitive Ethology: The 'Panglossian Paradigm' Defended. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):343-90.
    Ethologists and others studying animal behavior in a spirit are in need of a descriptive language and method that are neither anachronistically bound by behaviorist scruples nor prematurely committed to particular Just such an interim descriptive method can be found in intentional system theory. The use of intentional system theory is illustrated with the case of the apparently communicative behavior of vervet monkeys. A way of using the theory to generate data - including usable, testable data - is sketched. The (...)
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  2.  6
    Dale Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (1992). On Aims and Methods of Cognitive Ethology. Philosophy of Science Association 1992:110-124.
    In 1963 Niko Tinbergen published a paper, "On Aims and Methods of Ethology," dedicated to his friend Konrad Lorenz. Here Tinbergen defines ethology as "the biological study of behavior," and seeks to demonstrate "the close affinity between Ethology and the rest of Biology." Tinbergen identifies four major areas of ethology: causation, survival value, evolution, and ontogeny. Our goal is to attempt for cognitive ethology what Tinbergen succeeded in doing for ethology: to clarify its aims (...)
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  3.  1
    Jes Harfeld (2011). Philosophical Ethology: On the Extents of What It Is to Be a Pig. Society and Animals 19 (1):83-101.
    Answers to the question, “What is a farm animal?” often revolve around genetics, physical attributes, and the animals’ functions in agricultural production. The essential and defining characteristics of farm animals transcend these limited models, however, and require an answer that avoids reductionism and encompasses a de-atomizing point of view. Such an answer should promote recognition of animals as beings with extensive mental and social capabilities that outline the extent of each individual animal’s existence and—at the same time—define the animals as (...)
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  4.  60
    Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (1997). Species of Mind: The Philosophy and Biology of Cognitive Ethology. MIT Press.
    The heart of this book is the reciprocal relationship between philosophical theories of mind and empirical studies of animal cognition.
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  5.  7
    Donald R. Griffin (1978). Prospects for a Cognitive Ethology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):527.
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  6.  5
    Irenäus Eibl-Eibesfeldt (1979). Human Ethology: Concepts and Implications for the Sciences of Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):1-26.
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  7. Marc Bekoff (2006). Animal Passions and Beastly Virtues: Cognitive Ethology as the Unifying Science for Understanding the Subjective, Emotional, Empathic, and Moral Lives of Animals. Zygon 41 (1):71-104.
  8.  20
    Richard W. Burkhardt (1999). Ethology, Natural History, the Life Sciences, and the Problem of Place. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):489 - 508.
    Investigators of animal behavior since the eighteenth century have sought to make their work integral to the enterprises of natural history and/or the life sciences. In their efforts to do so, they have frequently based their claims of authority on the advantages offered by the special places where they have conducted their research. The zoo, the laboratory, and the field have been major settings for animal behavior studies. The issue of the relative advantages of these different sites has been a (...)
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  9. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather with whether (...)
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  10.  15
    Joseph J. Vitti (2013). Cephalopod Cognition in an Evolutionary Context: Implications for Ethology. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):393-401.
    What is the distribution of cognitive ability within the animal kingdom? It would be egalitarian to assume that variation in intelligence is everywhere clinal, but examining trends among major phylogenetic groups, it becomes easy to distinguish high-performing ‘generalists’ – whose behavior exhibits domain-flexibility – from ‘specialists’ whose range of behavior is limited and ecologically specific. These generalists include mammals, birds, and, intriguingly, cephalopods. The apparent intelligence of coleoid cephalopods (squids, octopuses, and cuttlefish) is surprising – and philosophically relevant – because (...)
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  11.  91
    Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (1995). Cognitive Ethology and the Intentionality of Animal Behavior. Mind and Language 10 (4):313-328.
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  12.  14
    J. Bennett (1991). How Is Cognitive Ethology Possible. In C. Ristau (ed.), Cognitive Ethology. The Minds of Other Animals. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers 35-49.
    Cognitive ethology cannot be done well unless its proximate philosophical underpinnings are got straight; this paper tries to help with that. Cognitive attributions are essentially explanatory—if they did not explain behavior, there would be no justification for them—but it doesn’t follow that they explain by providing causes for events that don’t have physical causes. To understand how mentalistic attributions do work, we need to focus on the quartet: sensory input, belief, desire, and behavioral output. We also need to be (...)
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  13. S. I. Yoerg & A. C. Kamil (1991). Prospects for a More Cognitive Ethology. In C. A. Ristau (ed.), Cognitive Ethology: The Minds of Other Animals. Lawrence Erlbaum 273--289.
     
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  14. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2007). Animal Minds, Cognitive Ethology, and Ethics. Journal of Ethics 11 (3):299-317.
    Our goal in this paper is to provide enough of an account of the origins of cognitive ethology and the controversy surrounding it to help ethicists to gauge for themselves how to balance skepticism and credulity about animal minds when communicating with scientists. We believe that ethicists’ arguments would benefit from better understanding of the historical roots of ongoing controversies. It is not appropriate to treat some widely reported results in animal cognition as if their interpretations are a matter (...)
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  15.  6
    Matthew Chrulew (2014). The Philosophical Ethology of Dominique Lestel. Angelaki 19 (3):17-44.
    Central to the work of Dominique Lestel is a sustained critical engagement with the sciences of animal behaviour. He critiques the legacy of Cartesianism that sees animals as machines, at the same time as acknowledging the revolution in the understanding of animals that took place in twentieth-century ethology. Further, he offers his own methodological proposals for the future of ethology as a fully social science founded on shared existence and understanding. This profusion of new evidence and edifying approaches (...)
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  16.  47
    Ingo Brigandt (2003). Gestalt Experiments and Inductive Observations: Konrad Lorenz's Early Epistemological Writings and the Methods of Classical Ethology. Evolution and Cognition 9:157–170.
    Ethology brought some crucial insights and perspectives to the study of behavior, in particular the idea that behavior can be studied within a comparative-evolutionary framework by means of homologizing components of behavioral patterns and by causal analysis of behavior components and their integration. Early ethology is well-known for its extensive use of qualitative observations of animals under their natural conditions. These observations are combined with experiments that try to analyze behavioral patterns and establish specific claims about animal behavior. (...)
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  17. Paul Edmund Griffiths, Ethology, Sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology.
    In the years leading up to the Second World War the ethologists Konrad Lorenz and Nikolaas Tinbergen, created the tradition of rigorous, Darwinian research on animal behavior that developed into modern behavioral ecology. At first glance, research on specifically human behavior seems to exhibit greater discontinuity that research on animal behavior in general. The 'human ethology' of the 1960s appears to have been replaced in the early 1970s by a new approach called ‘sociobiology’. Sociobiology in its turn appears to (...)
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  18.  13
    Dale Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (1992). On Aims and Methods of Cognitive Ethology. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:110-124.
    In 1963 Niko Tinbergen published a paper, "On Aims and Methods of Ethology," dedicated to his friend Konrad Lorenz. Here Tinbergen defines ethology as "the biological study of behavior," and seeks to demonstrate "the close affinity between Ethology and the rest of Biology." Tinbergen identifies four major areas of ethology: causation, survival value, evolution, and ontogeny. Our goal is to attempt for cognitive ethology what Tinbergen succeeded in doing for ethology: to clarify its aims (...)
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  19.  2
    Jeffrey Bussolini (2016). The Philosophical Ethology of Roberto Marchesini. Angelaki 21 (1):17-38.
    Central to the work of Roberto Marchesini is a sustained critical engagement with the sciences of animal behavior. Drawing on veterinary, biological, and philosophical training, he critiques the legacy of Cartesianism that sees animals as machines at the same time as acknowledging the importance of biological knowledge and approaches for understanding animals. Further, he offers his own version of a zooanthropological and posthumanist method for the future of ethology as an interdisciplinary social science founded on shared existence, interaction, and (...)
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  20.  5
    K. Kortmulder (1974). On Ethology and Human Behaviour. Acta Biotheoretica 23 (2):55-78.
    The paper provides a critical discussion of the role ethology may play in the study of human behaviour. The mechanisms of avoidance of consanguineal mating in some animal species and Man are analysed and compared. Aggression and competition are discussed in relation to agonistic courtship, and play behaviour.
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  21.  7
    V. Csanyi (1990). Ethology, Power, Possession: A System Theoretical Study of the Hungarian Transition. World Futures 29 (1):107-122.
    (1990). Ethology, power, possession: A system theoretical study of the Hungarian transition. World Futures: Vol. 29, Transition in Eastern Europe, pp. 107-122.
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  22.  14
    Rodrigo de Sá-Nogueira Saraiva (forthcoming). Classic Ethology Reappraised. Behavior and Philosophy.
    I analyze the theoretical tenets of early ethology and the criticisms leveled against it from comparative psychology. Early ethology had a clear research object, the study of behavioral adaptedness. Adaptedness was explained by the functional rules and programs that underlie the relation between a given organism and its natural environment (the function cycle). This research object was lost during the redefinition of ethology that took place after the Second World War, a redefinition that led to an emphasis (...)
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  23.  1
    Roberto Marchesini (2016). Philosophical Ethology and Animal Subjectivity. Angelaki 21 (1):237-252.
    Philosophical ethology draws heavily upon the methods and findings of ethological traditions but must be a properly philosophical undertaking that reframes them in terms of critical and speculative questions about animal mind and animal subjectivity. Both traditional ethology and later cognitive ethology failed to call into question the dualistic Cartesian ontological paradigm that introduced and justified an unbridgeable divide between human and nonhuman animals. Following the implications of Darwinian evolution and immanentist ontological philosophy, philosophical ethology presents (...)
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  24.  9
    David Loye, Peter Saunders, Eric Chaisson, Rod Swenson & Michael Ghiselin (1991). Evolutionary Systems and Society, Vilmos Csanyi, Professor of Ethology and Behavior Genetics, Lorand Eotvos University, Budapest, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1989. 304 Pp. $49.50 (Cloth). [REVIEW] World Futures 30 (3):191-206.
    (1991). Evolutionary Systems and Society, Vilmos Csányi, Professor of Ethology and Behavior Genetics, Lorand Eotvos University, Budapest, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1989. 304 pp. $49.50 (cloth). World Futures: Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 191-206.
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  25.  5
    Brett Buchanan, Jeffrey Bussolini & Matthew Chrulew (2014). General Introduction: Philosophical Ethology. Angelaki 19 (3):1-3.
    A cross-section of the writings of Dominique Lestel, Vinciane Despret and Roberto Marchesini is presented here in translation across three special issues on philosophical ethology. These thinkers, relatively unknown in anglophone scholarship, offer important contributions to contemporary debates in posthumanism and animal studies. Particularly in so far as they scrutinise our often awkward attempts to understand the behaviour of animals in labs and fields – to know what animal bodies can do – they share in the rethinking of interspecies (...)
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  26.  21
    G. Thines & R. Zayan (1975). F. J. J. Buytendijk's Contribution to Animal Behaviour: Animal Psychology or Ethology? Acta Biotheoretica 24 (3-4):86-99.
    F. J. J.Buytendijk died on October 21st 1974 at the age of 87. His important contribution to the study of animal behaviour is analyzed here in relation to the historical development of animal psychology and ethology. The detailed study of his scientific production suggests, according to the authors, that some important findings, although largely not paid attention to in present-day literature, are akin to the conceptual and methodological evolution of comparative ethology.
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  27.  1
    Matthew Chrulew, Jeffrey Bussolini & Brett Buchanan (2014). General Introduction: Philosophical Ethology. Angelaki 19 (3):1-3.
    A cross-section of the writings of Dominique Lestel, Vinciane Despret and Roberto Marchesini is presented here in translation across three special issues on philosophical ethology. These thinkers, relatively unknown in anglophone scholarship, offer important contributions to contemporary debates in posthumanism and animal studies. Particularly in so far as they scrutinise our often awkward attempts to understand the behaviour of animals in labs and fields – to know what animal bodies can do – they share in the rethinking of interspecies (...)
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  28.  9
    Lester Embree (2008). A Beginning for the Phenomenological Theory of Primate Ethology. Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):61-74.
    To establish a starting point for a phenomenological theory of the science of primate ethology, this essay first reviews how the phenomenological philosophers Aron Gurwitsch and Maurice Merleau-Ponty made use of the Gestalt psychologist Wolfgang Köhler’s description of chimpanzee consciousness and its objects and then considers primate ethology in light of the theory of the cultural sciences in the work of Gurwitsch in addition to that of Alfred Schutz.
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  29.  3
    Carolyn A. Ristau (2011). Cognitive Ethology, Over-Attribution of Agency and Focusing Abilities as They Relate to the Origin of Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):146-147.
    Carey's superb discussion of the origin of concepts is extended into the field of cognitive ethology. I also suggest that agency may be a default mechanism, often leading to over-attribution. The problem therefore becomes one of specifying the conditions in which agency is not attributed. The significance of attentional/focusing abilities on conceptual development is also emphasized.
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  30.  10
    Fabienne Lenoble & Pascal Carlier (1996). A Possible Contribution of Phenomenology to Ethology: Application to a Behaviour Pattern in the Mouse. Acta Biotheoretica 44 (1):75-83.
    Classical ethology encourages a causal approach to animal behaviour, using Tinbergen's four questions concerning evolution, function, mechanism and development of behaviour. It sets aside the study of mental processes, which could otherwise help to unify our picture of the relationships between animal and environment. Here the steps in research focused on the psychological meaning of a peculiar behaviour in the mouse — carrying its tail — and what this implies regarding the mouse's cognitive world are given. Initial empirical observations (...)
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  31.  3
    Sonja I. Yoerg & Alan C. Kamil (1991). Integrating Cognitive Ethology with Cognitive Psychology. In C. A. Ristau (ed.), Cognitive Ethology: The Minds of Other Animals. Lawrence Erlbaum 273--289.
  32.  6
    Daniel A. Dombrowski (1994). The Politics of Ethology. Critical Review 8 (3):359-369.
    While the academic discussion of gender and family issues often adopts the contractarian and consensual approach of liberalism, the work of Stephen R. L. Clark provides an interesting contrast. Clark turns to ethology as a guide to modes of social existence congruent with our evolutionary nature. Although an Aristotelian, Clark is not a sexist in arguing that household life is more important than what moderns call ?political? life. Clark is premature, however, in accusing liberals who defend the rights of (...)
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  33. Adrian Treves & Diego Pizzagalli (2002). Vigilance and Perception of Social Stimuli: Views From Ethology, and Social Neuroscience. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press 463--469.
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  34.  42
    C. A. Ristau (ed.) (1991). Cognitive Ethology: The Minds of Other Animals. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  35.  2
    Michael W. Fox (1986). Laboratory Animal Husbandry: Ethology, Welfare, and Experimental Variables. State University of New York Press.
    The laboratory animal environment: room for concern.
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  36. Richard W. Burkhardt & Hans Kruuk (2007). Patterns of Behavior: Konrad Lorenz, Niko Tinbergen, and the Founding of Ethology. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):565-575.
     
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  37.  5
    Rita E. Anderson (1986). Cognitive Explanations and Cognitive Ethology. In William Bechtel (ed.), Integrating Scientific Disciplines. 323--336.
  38.  73
    Mark Ereshefsky (2007). Psychological Categories as Homologies: Lessons From Ethology. Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):659-674.
    Biology and Philosophy, forthcoming 2007.
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  39.  2
    Jonathan Bennett (1983). Cognitive Ethology: Theory or Poetry? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):356.
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  40.  3
    Gordon M. Burghardt (1978). Closing the Circle: The Ethology of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):562.
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  41. Jack P. Hailman (1979). The Ethology Behind Human Ethology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):35-36.
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  42.  60
    J. Vauclair (1997). Mental States in Animals: Cognitive Ethology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):35-39.
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  43.  5
    Søren Brier (1999). Biosemiotics and the Foundation of Cybersemiotics: Reconceptualizing the Insights of Ethology, Second-Order Cybernetics, and Peirce’s Semiotics in Biosemiotics to Create a Non-Cartesian Information Science. Semiotica 127 (1-4):169-198.
    Any great new theoretical framework has an epistemological and an ontological aspect to its philosophy as well as an axiological one, and one needs to understand all three aspects in order to grasp the deep aspiration and idea of the theoretical framework. Presently, there is a widespread effort to understand C. S. Peirce's (1837–1914) pragmaticistic semeiotics, and to develop it by integrating the results of modern science and evolutionary thinking; first, producing a biosemiotics and, second, by integrating it with the (...)
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  44.  12
    Marc Bekoff & Colin Allen (1997). Cognitive Ethology: Slayers, Skeptics, and Proponents. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press 313--334.
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  45.  1
    Marga Vicedo (2009). The Father of Ethology and the Foster Mother of Ducks: Konrad Lorenz as Expert on Motherhood. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 100:263-291.
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  46.  80
    José Luis Bermúdez (2006). Knowledge, Naturalism, and Cognitive Ethology: Kornblith's Knowledge and its Place in Nature. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):299 - 316.
    This paper explores Kornblith’s proposal in Knowledge and its Place in Nature that knowledge is a natural kind that can be elucidated and understood in scientific terms. Central to Kornblith’s development of this proposal is the claim that there is a single category of unreflective knowledge that is studied by cognitive ethologists and is the proper province of epistemology. This claim is challenged on the grounds that even unreflective knowledge in language-using humans reflects forms of logical reasoning that are in (...)
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  47.  11
    K. Kortmulder (1983). Play-Like Behaviour: An Essay in Speculative Ethology. Acta Biotheoretica 32 (3):145-166.
    It is claimed that certain processes of individual behaviour and of interaction between individuals run parallel. Such parallels are seen along three axes: antagonism-coordination, constriction-expansion and neutral-play-like.Characteristics of ritualized behaviour and play are analysed and the two categories of behaviour are compared in detail. They are shown to differ largely in degree of expansion. They also differ along the antagonism-coordination axis. Both are play-like.
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  48.  3
    Hugh T. Wilder (1996). Interpretative Cognitive Ethology. In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press 29--62.
  49.  9
    George J. Engelhardt (1975). The Ecclesiastical Pilgrims of the Canterbury Tales: A Study in Ethology. Mediaeval Studies 37 (1):287-315.
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  50. Louis A. Fourcher (1979). Human Ethology and Phenomenology Part I. Behaviorism 7 (1):23-36.
     
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