Search results for 'Eudaemonism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  55
    Ralph Wedgwood (2009). Diotima's Eudaemonism: Intrinsic Value and Rational Motivation in Plato's Symposium. Phronesis 54 (4):297-325.
    This paper gives a new interpretation of the central section of Plato's Symposium (199d-212a). According to this interpretation, the term "καλóν", as used by Plato here, stands for what many contemporary philosophers call "intrinsic value"; and "love" (ἔρως) is in effect rational motivation , which for Plato consists in the desire to "possess" intrinsically valuable things - that is, according to Plato, to be happy - for as long as possible. An explanation is given of why Plato believes that "possessing" (...)
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  2.  86
    Ralph Wedgwood (2009). Diotima's Eudaemonism: Intrinsic Value and Rational Motivation in Plato's Symposium. Phronesis 54 (4):297-325.
    This paper gives a new interpretation of the central section of Plato’s Symposium (199d–212a). According to this interpretation, the term ‘καλόν’, as used by Plato here, stands for what many contemporary philosophers call “intrinsic value”; and “love” (ἔρως) is in effect rational motivation, which for Plato consists in the desire to “possess” intrinsically valuable things – that is, according to Plato, to be happy – for as long as possible. An explanation is given of why Plato believes that “possessing” intrinsically (...)
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  3. Tobias Schaffner (forthcoming). The Eudaemonist Ethics of Hugo Grotius : Pre-Modern Moral Philosophy for the Twenty-First Century? Jurisprudence:1-45.
    The present article challenges the popular image of Hugo Grotius as the founder of modern moral philosophy. It establishes that he continued the dialectical search for the good life distinctive of pre-modern ethics. Key in correcting the image of Grotius as innovator—an image almost as old as his De Jure Belli ac Pacis of 1625—is the realisation that this treatise deals only of the requirements for just use of force set out in what Grotius calls ‘law in the strict sense’. (...)
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  4. Tobias Schaffner (forthcoming). The Eudaemonist Ethics of Hugo Grotius : Pre-Modern Moral Philosophy for the Twenty-First Century? Jurisprudence:1-45.
    The present article challenges the popular image of Hugo Grotius as the founder of modern moral philosophy. It establishes that he continued the dialectical search for the good life distinctive of pre-modern ethics. Key in correcting the image of Grotius as innovator—an image almost as old as his De Jure Belli ac Pacis of 1625—is the realisation that this treatise deals only of the requirements for just use of force set out in what Grotius calls ‘law in the strict sense’. (...)
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  5.  10
    Thomas Atwater (1984). Marx and a Credible Form of Eudaemonism. Southwest Philosophy Review 1:55-69.
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  6.  13
    Katherin A. Rogers (2005). Anselm on Eudaemonism and the Hierarchical Structure of Moral Choice. Religious Studies 41 (3):249-268.
    Because Anselm of Canterbury argues that the morally responsible created agent must have the option to choose between justice and benefit, many scholars conclude that he is a proto-Kantian, pitting duty against self-interest and natural inclination. This is mistaken. Anselm proposes a hierarchical schema, prefiguring that of Harry Frankfurt, in which the inclination for justice constitutes a second-order desire that one's first-order desires for benefits should be moderated to conform to God's will. I defend this interpretation through careful textual analysis, (...)
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  7. David Baumbardt (1964). Natural Right in Itself and Allegedly Relativistic Eudaemonism. In Sidney Hook (ed.), Law and Philosophy. [New York]New York University Press
     
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  8. Charles Joshua Horn (2011). Leibniz: Naturalism and Eudaemonism. Philosophical Forum 42 (3):300-301.
     
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  9. M. Mori (1993). Happiness and Autonomy, the German Dispute on Eudaemonism Between the Enlightenment and Idealism. Studia Leibnitiana 25 (1):27-42.
  10. Katherin A. Rogers (2005). Anselm on Eudaemonism and the Hierarchical Structure of Moral Choice. Religious Studies 41 (3):249-268.
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  11. Sigbjørn Olsen Sønnesyn (2008). Ut Sine Fine Amet Summam Essentiam: The Eudaemonist Ethics of St. Anselm. Mediaeval Studies 70:1-28.
     
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  12. H. Weidemann (2001). Kant's Criticism of Eudaemonism and the Platonic Ethics. Kant-Studien 92 (1):19-37.
     
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  13.  3
    Robert Meister (1993). Is Moderation a Virtue? Gregory Vlastos and the Toxins of Eudaemonism. Apeiron 26 (3/4):111 - 135.
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  14.  16
    David Clowney (2013). Biophilia as an Environmental Virtue. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):999-1014.
    Beginning with E. O. Wilson’s notion of biophilia, our “innate tendency to focus on life and life-like processes,” I construct an environmental virtue with the same name that meets certain criteria an environmental virtue should meet. I argue that this virtue can have its status as a virtue by its contribution to human flourishing, while having care for live nature as its target, and care about live nature as its affective content. I explore its characteristics as both an individual (...)
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  15. Lorenzo Greco (forthcoming). Aspirazione, riflessione e felicità: l’etica della virtù di Julia Annas. Iride.
    In this short essay I offer a survey of Julia Annas’ perspective on virtue ethics. I focus on her most recent work, and highlight the role reflection plays in shaping her conception of the virtuous agent. I compare her approach with that of rival moral conceptions, both within and outside virtue ethics, and conclude with a doubt raised from a Humean point of view.
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  16. Kim Cameron (2011). Responsible Leadership as Virtuous Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):25-35.
    Responsible leadership is rare. It is not that most leaders are irresponsible, but responsibility in leadership is frequently defined so that an important connotation of responsible leadership is ignored. This article equates responsible leadership with virtuousness. Using this connotation implies that responsible leadership is based on three assumptions—eudaemonism, inherent value, and amplification. Secondarily, this connotation produces two important outcomes—a fixed point for coping with change, and benefits for constituencies who may never be affected otherwise. (...)
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  17. Julia Annas (1995). Prudence and Morality in Ancient and Modern Ethics. Ethics 105 (2):241-257.
    Examines prudential and moral reasoning in ancient and modern ethics. Ancient ethical theories' task of articulating the agent's overall goal; Structural differences between ancient eudaemonist theories and modern theories; Virtue as a complex intellectual kind of understanding.
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  18. Gregory Vlastos (1985). Happiness and Virtue in Socrates' Moral Theory. Topoi 4 (1):3-22.
    In Section IV above we start with texts whose prima facie import speaks so strongly for the Identity Thesis that any interpretation which stops short of it looks like a shabby, timorous, thesis-saving move. What else could Socrates mean when he declares with such conviction that ‘no evil’ can come to a good man (T19), that his prosecutors ‘could not harm’ him (T16(a)), that if a man has not been made more unjust he has not been harmed (T20), that ‘all (...)
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  19.  22
    Gary L. Cesarz (2005). Spinoza's Book of Life: Freedom and Redemption in the Ethics (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):361-362.
    Gary L. Cesarz - Spinoza's Book of Life: Freedom and Redemption in the Ethics - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 43.3 361-362 Steven B. Smith. Spinoza's Book of Life: Freedom and Redemption in the Ethics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003. Pp. xxvi + 230. Cloth, $35.00. Smith's well-crafted narrative contributes substantially to revealing the moral and political intentions "at the core" of the Ethics . Its focus is the role and possibility (...)
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  20.  18
    Alan R. White (1952). Conscience and Self-Love in Butler's Sermons. Philosophy 27 (103):329 - 344.
    Mr. T. H. Mcpherson has given, in a recent article in PHILOSOPHY , various reasons for supposing that there was a development in Butler's ethics from the Sermons to the Analogy . He argues that Butler was in the Sermons a “rational egoist” or “Ethical Eudaemonist,” and in the Analogy an Intuitionist. By “Ethical Eudaemonism” he seems1 to mean that “the ground or criterion of rightness is conduciveness to the agent's interest” or that “it is the happiness-producing character of (...)
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  21.  14
    Hermann Weidemann (2001). Kants Kritik Am Eudämonismus Und Die Platonische Ethik. Kant-Studien 92 (1):19-37.
    The paper attempts to show that Kant's criticism of eudaemonism does not affect Plato's moral theory, because the kind of eudaemonism which Plato embraces is different from that rejected by Kant. Whereas the target of Kant's criticism is the view that virtuous actions are an instrumental means to becoming happy, Plato regards virtue as a constitutive part of happiness and is, thus, committed to what Gregory Vlastos has called a "noninstrumentalist form of eudaemonism".
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  22.  7
    Wim Bollen (2007). Alienation and the Siren Song of Nature. Ethical Perspectives 14 (4):479-500.
    In this article we discuss Adorno’s and Horkheimer’s hermeneutical interpretation of Odysseus’ encounter with Circe in their Dialectic of Enlightenment. This encounter is further interpreted – via the ecofeminist homology between women and nature – as an answer to “the siren song of nature,” in which the elements of attraction and threat to human subjectivity are deeply intertwined. Whereas his crew gives in to the siren song and experiences the pleasure of being swine, enlightened Odysseus himself resists the temptation by (...)
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  23.  6
    Bryan van Norden, Review: Posted August 14, 1995. [REVIEW]
    nnas' article is the first of three in a "Symposium on Ancient Ethics." She begins with the observation that ancient ethics are "eudaemonist" in form. That is, they assume "that each of us has a vague and unarticulated idea of an overall or final goal in our life," which we label eudaimonia or happiness, "and the task of ethical theory is to give each person a clear, articulated, and correct account of this overall goal and how to achieve it" (p. (...)
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  24.  3
    Brian Duignan (ed.) (2011). Thinkers and Theories in Ethics. Rosen Education Services.
    Normative ethics: Eudaemonism and Consequentialism -- Normative ethics: Contractualism, Deontology, Feminism, and Egoism -- Metaethics -- Applied ethics.
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