Search results for 'Eudaemonism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ralph Wedgwood (2009). Diotima's Eudaemonism: Intrinsic Value and Rational Motivation in Plato's Symposium. Phronesis 54 (4):297-325.score: 18.0
    This paper gives a new interpretation of the central section of Plato's Symposium (199d-212a). According to this interpretation, the term "καλóν", as used by Plato here, stands for what many contemporary philosophers call "intrinsic value"; and "love" (ἔρως) is in effect rational motivation , which for Plato consists in the desire to "possess" intrinsically valuable things - that is, according to Plato, to be happy - for as long as possible. An explanation is given of why Plato believes that "possessing" (...)
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  2. Katherin A. Rogers (2005). Anselm on Eudaemonism and the Hierarchical Structure of Moral Choice. Religious Studies 41 (3):249-268.score: 9.0
    Because Anselm of Canterbury argues that the morally responsible created agent must have the option to choose between justice and benefit, many scholars conclude that he is a proto-Kantian, pitting duty against self-interest and natural inclination. This is mistaken. Anselm proposes a hierarchical schema, prefiguring that of Harry Frankfurt, in which the inclination for justice constitutes a second-order desire that one's first-order desires for benefits should be moderated to conform to God's will. I defend this interpretation through careful textual analysis, (...)
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  3. Thomas Atwater (1984). Marx and a Credible Form of Eudaemonism. Southwest Philosophy Review 1:55-69.score: 9.0
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  4. David Baumbardt (1964). Natural Right in Itself and Allegedly Relativistic Eudaemonism. In Sidney Hook (ed.), Law and Philosophy. [New York]New York University Press.score: 9.0
     
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  5. Charles Joshua Horn (2011). Leibniz: Naturalism and Eudaemonism. Philosophical Forum 42 (3):300-301.score: 9.0
     
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  6. M. Mori (1993). Happiness and Autonomy, the German Dispute on Eudaemonism Between the Enlightenment and Idealism. Studia Leibnitiana 25 (1):27-42.score: 9.0
     
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  7. Sigbjørn Olsen Sønnesyn (2008). Ut Sine Fine Amet Summam Essentiam: The Eudaemonist Ethics of St. Anselm. Mediaeval Studies 70:1-28.score: 9.0
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  8. H. Weidemann (2001). Kant's Criticism of Eudaemonism and the Platonic Ethics. Kant-Studien 92 (1):19-37.score: 9.0
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  9. David Clowney (2013). Biophilia as an Environmental Virtue. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):999-1014.score: 6.0
    Beginning with E. O. Wilson’s notion of biophilia, our “innate tendency to focus on life and life-like processes,” I construct an environmental virtue with the same name that meets certain criteria an environmental virtue should meet. I argue that this virtue can have its status as a virtue by its contribution to human flourishing, while having care for live nature as its target, and care about live nature as its affective content. I explore its characteristics as both an individual and (...)
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  10. Gregory Vlastos (1985). Happiness and Virtue in Socrates' Moral Theory. Topoi 4 (1):3-22.score: 3.0
    In Section IV above we start with texts whose prima facie import speaks so strongly for the Identity Thesis that any interpretation which stops short of it looks like a shabby, timorous, thesis-saving move. What else could Socrates mean when he declares with such conviction that ‘no evil’ can come to a good man (T19), that his prosecutors ‘could not harm’ him (T16(a)), that if a man has not been made more unjust he has not been harmed (T20), that ‘all (...)
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  11. Julia Annas (1995). Prudence and Morality in Ancient and Modern Ethics. Ethics 105 (2):241-257.score: 3.0
    Examines prudential and moral reasoning in ancient and modern ethics. Ancient ethical theories' task of articulating the agent's overall goal; Structural differences between ancient eudaemonist theories and modern theories; Virtue as a complex intellectual kind of understanding.
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  12. Kim Cameron (2011). Responsible Leadership as Virtuous Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):25-35.score: 3.0
    Responsible leadership is rare. It is not that most leaders are irresponsible, but responsibility in leadership is frequently defined so that an important connotation of responsible leadership is ignored. This article equates responsible leadership with virtuousness. Using this connotation implies that responsible leadership is based on three assumptions—eudaemonism, inherent value, and amplification. Secondarily, this connotation produces two important outcomes—a fixed point for coping with change, and benefits for constituencies who may never be affected otherwise. The meaning and advantages of (...)
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  13. Hermann Weidemann (2001). Kants Kritik Am Eudämonismus Und Die Platonische Ethik. Kant Studien 92 (1):19-37.score: 3.0
    The paper attempts to show that Kant's criticism of eudaemonism does not affect Plato's moral theory, because the kind of eudaemonism which Plato embraces is different from that rejected by Kant. Whereas the target of Kant's criticism is the view that virtuous actions are an instrumental means to becoming happy, Plato regards virtue as a constitutive part of happiness and is, thus, committed to what Gregory Vlastos has called a "noninstrumentalist form of eudaemonism".
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  14. Bryan van Norden, Review: Posted August 14, 1995. [REVIEW]score: 3.0
    nnas' article is the first of three in a "Symposium on Ancient Ethics." She begins with the observation that ancient ethics are "eudaemonist" in form. That is, they assume "that each of us has a vague and unarticulated idea of an overall or final goal in our life," which we label eudaimonia or happiness, "and the task of ethical theory is to give each person a clear, articulated, and correct account of this overall goal and how to achieve it" (p. (...)
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  15. Brian Duignan (ed.) (2011). Thinkers and Theories in Ethics. Rosen Education Services.score: 3.0
    Normative ethics: Eudaemonism and Consequentialism -- Normative ethics: Contractualism, Deontology, Feminism, and Egoism -- Metaethics -- Applied ethics.
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  16. Henry E. Allison (2007). Comments on Guyer. Inquiry 50 (5):480 – 488.score: 1.0
    Guyer argues for four major theses. First, in his early, pre-critical discussions of morality, Kant advocated a version of rational egoism, in which freedom, understood naturalistically as a freedom from domination by both one's own inclinations and from other people, rather than happiness, is the fundamental value. From this point of view, the function of the moral law is to prescribe rules best suited to the preservation and maximization of such freedom, just as on the traditional eudaemonistic account it is (...)
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  17. Ronald M. Polansky (2000). "Phronesis" on Tour: Cultural Adaptability of Aristotelian Ethical Notions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (4):323-336.score: 1.0
    : How might bioethics take account of cultural diversity? Can practical wisdom of an Aristotelian sort be applied across cultures? After showing that practical wisdom involves both intellectual cleverness and moral virtue, it is argued that both these components have universality. Hence practical wisdom must be universal as well. Hellenic ethical thought neither depended on outdated theoretical notions nor limited itself to the Greek world, but was in fact developed with constant awareness of cultural differences, so it arguably works as (...)
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  18. R. Kamtekar (2007). Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. Philosophical Review 116 (4):650-653.score: 1.0
    James Warren, Facing Death, Epicurus and his Critics. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2004. Pp. viii, 240. ISBN 0-19-925289-0. $45.00. Reviewed by Thornton Lockwood, Sacred Heart University (tlockwood@verizon.net) Word count: 2152 words ------------------------------- To modern ears, the word Epicurean indicates (if anything) an interest in fine dining. But at least throughout the early modern period up until the 19th century, Epicureanism was known less for its relation to food preparation and more so, if not scandalously so, for its doctrine about the annihilation (...)
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  19. Matthew Johnson (2012). Towards a Theory of Cultural Evaluation. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (2):1-23.score: 1.0
    From which evaluative base should we develop public policies designed to promote wellbeing among different cultural groups in different circumstances? This article attempts to advance an objective, universal theory of cultural evaluation grounded in a eudaemonistic account of human wellbeing. The approach evaluates cultures on the success with which they enable societies to promote the wellbeing of individuals through provision of needs and capabilities within their given, determinate circumstances. This provides the basis for a normative functionalism capable of identifying and (...)
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