Search results for 'Eudaimonia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aristotle On Eudaimonia (2010). Iohn L. Ackrill. In Otfried Höffe (ed.), Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics". Brill.score: 30.0
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  2. David Shaw (2009). Euthanasia and Eudaimonia. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):530-533.score: 18.0
    This paper re-evaluates euthanasia and assisted suicide from the perspective of eudaimonia, the ancient Greek conception of happiness across one’s whole life. It is argued that one cannot be said to have fully flourished or had a truly happy life if one’s death is preceded by a period of unbearable pain or suffering that one cannot avoid without assistance in ending one’s life. While death is to be accepted as part of life, it should not be left to nature (...)
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  3. Robert L. Woolfolk & Rachel H. Wasserman (2005). Count No One Happy: Eudaimonia and Positive Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):81-90.score: 15.0
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  4. Matthew Cashen (2012). Happiness,Eudaimonia, and The Principle of Descriptive Adequacy. Metaphilosophy 43 (5):619-635.score: 15.0
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  5. Matthew D. Mendham (2007). Eudaimonia and Agape in Macintyre and Kierkegaard's Works of Love. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (4):591-625.score: 15.0
    This essay explores connections and divergences between Alasdair MacIntyre's eudaimonistic ethic and Søren Kierkegaard's agapeistic ethic--perhaps the greatest proponents of these ethical paradigms from the past two centuries. The purpose of the work is threefold. First, to demonstrate an impressive amount of convergence and complementarity in their approaches to the transcendent grounds of an ethic of flourishing, the rigors necessary for a proper self-love, and the other-directed nature of proper social relations. Second, given the inapplicability of common dichotomies, to pinpoint (...)
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  6. Michelle Mason & Valerie Tiberius (2009). Eudaimonia. In Shane J. Lopez (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology. Wiley-Blackwell. 1--351.score: 15.0
  7. Jennifer Whiting (2002). Eudaimonia, External Results, and Choosing Virtuous Actions for Themselves. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):270-290.score: 12.0
    Aristotle's requirement that virtuous actions be chosen for themselves is typically interpreted, in Kantian terms, as taking virtuous action to have intrinsic rather than consequentialist value. This raises problems about how to reconcile Aristotle's requirement with (a) the fact that virtuous actions typically aim at ends beyond themselves (usually benefits to others); and (b) Aristotle's apparent requirement that everything (including virtuous action) be chosen for the sake of eudaimonia. I offer an alternative interpretation, based on Aristotle's account of loving (...)
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  8. Robert Heinaman (1993). Rationality, Eudaimonia and Kakodaimonia in Aristotle. Phronesis 38 (1):31 - 56.score: 12.0
    I argue that Aristotle does not believe all rational action aims at securing eudaimonia (happiness) for the agent. Intrinsic goods are worth having independently of their promotion of any further ends, including eudaimonia. Aiming for such a good or avoiding evil may be rational even when eudaimonia is impossible and not the agent's goal. "Politics" 1332a7f suggests that even the happy agent may act rationally without aiming for eudaimonia. The final section argues that, given that an (...)
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  9. David Webb (2010). The Structure of Praxis and the Time of Eudaimonia. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (2):265-287.score: 12.0
    The conception of time presented in Aristotle’s Physics IV has been supremely influential in the philosophical tradition. However, I shall argue that it proves to be inadequate to resolve a question arising from Aristotle’s own ethics; namely, the relation of ethical action to eudaimonia. As one explores this issue, a sense of time begins to emerge that calls for a reconsideration of the concepts of magnitude or dimension (megethos) and continuity (suneches) that determine the account of time found in (...)
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  10. T. Duvall & P. Dotson (1998). Political Participation and Eudaimonia in Aristotle's Politics. History of Political Thought 19 (1):21-34.score: 12.0
    Current debates surrounding Aristotle's Politics involve attempts to explain the role of political participation in the pursuit of Aristotle's human telos, eudaimonia. Many argue that political participation is crucial to eudaimonia, equating the good man with the good citizen. Often this argument is based on Aristotle's labelling of humans as zoon politikon, or �political animal�, and the misleading translation of eudaimonia as �happiness�. We provide supported explanations of eudaimonia and zoon politikon which do not force us (...)
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  11. James A. Tantillo (2001). Sport Hunting, Eudaimonia, and Tragic Wisdom. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):101-112.score: 12.0
    Anti-hunters frequently overlook or underestimate the positive values associated with reflective sport hunting. In this essay I characterize the value of hunting in the context of an Aristotelian virtue ethic. Sport hunting done for the purpose of recreation contributes heavily to the eudaimonia (flourishing) of hunters. I employ Aristotelian insights about tragedy to defend hunting as an activity especially well-suited for promoting a range of crucial intellectual and emotional virtues. Reflective sport hunters develop a “realistic awareness of death” and (...)
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  12. Marcus H. Worner (forthcoming). Eudaimonia" in Aristotle's "Rhetoric. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy.score: 12.0
    The discussion of "eudaimonia" in the "rhetoric" has a central place in Aristotle's exposition of the material for speeches deliberative, epideictic and forensic varieties of rhetoric. Due to the telos- relatedness of the material for each variety of rhetoric, the treatise on "eudaimonia" (Rhet A5) provides coherence between the varieties by displaying standards in terms of which particular cases at hand are ultimately assessed as good, useful, noble, just or their opposites. A focal and normative meaning of (...) can be identified in A5 which Aristotle expects a prudent orator to maintain even when he is faced with perverted audiences. (shrink)
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  13. Emma Rooksby (2004). E-Mail and Eudaimonia: Global Justice and Moral Concern. South African Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):402-410.score: 12.0
    In his recent book, Happiness, Pedro Tabensky has argued for an Aristotelian account of happiness as eudaimonia or flourishing. However, his account of happiness appears to have the unfortunate implication that both individual eudaimonia and global justice are in principle unattainable. I examine Tabensky's reasons for believing that his account has such unfortunate implications, and suggest that, if appropriately modified, he would be able to avoid them. S. Afr. J. Philos. Vol.23(4) 2004: 402-410.
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  14. Thomas Nagel (1972). Aristotle on Eudaimonia. Phronesis 17 (3):252 - 259.score: 9.0
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  15. Anne Baril (2014). Eudaimonia in Contemporary Virtue Ethics. In Stan van Hooft (ed.), Handbook of Virtue Ethics. 17-27.score: 9.0
  16. Wei Liu (2011). An All-Inclusive Interpretation of Aristotle's Contemplative Life. Sophia 50 (1):57-71.score: 9.0
    The debate between ‘inclusive’ and ‘dominant’ interpretations of Aristotle's concept of happiness (eudaimonia) has become one of the thorniest problems of Aristotle interpretation. In this paper, I attempt to solve this problem by presenting a multi-step argument for an ‘all-inclusive’ thesis, i.e., the Aristotelian philosopher or contemplator, in the strict sense, is someone who already possesses all the intellectual virtues (except technē), all the moral virtues (by way of the possession of phronēsis), and considerable other goods. If this thesis (...)
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  17. Robert Heinaman (1988). Eudaimonia and Self-Sufficiency in the Nicomachean Ethics. Phronesis 33 (1):31-53.score: 9.0
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  18. A. F. Mackay (2005). Aristotle's Dilemma. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):533 - 549.score: 9.0
    In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle appears to use an elegant short argument to attack Plato’s doctrine of the good, which argument equally appears to attack Aristotle’s own doctrine of the good. I consider these two questions: First: Why does Aristotle reverse the judgment of Socrates/Plato on the issue: Which is better – things that are (only) good in themselves, or things that are both good in themselves and good for their consequences? Second: Why does Aristotle attack Plato’s doctrine that the (...)
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  19. R. Heinaman (2002). The Improvability of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 23:99-147.score: 9.0
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  20. Alan S. Waterman (1990). The Relevance of Aristotle's Conception of Eudaimonia for the Psychological Study of Happiness. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):39-44.score: 9.0
  21. R. Heinaman (2007). Eudaimonia as an Activity in Nicomachean Ethics I. 8-12. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:247-279.score: 9.0
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  22. J. C. Dybikowski (1981). Is Aristotelian Eudaimonia Happiness? Dialogue 20 (02):185-200.score: 9.0
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  23. Kieran McGroarty (2006). Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead I. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
    In this volume, Kieran McGroarty provides a philosophical commentary on a section of the Enneads written by the last great Neoplatonist thinker, Plotinus. The treatise is entitled "Concerning Well-Being" and was written at a late stage in Plotinus' life when he was suffering from an illness that was shortly to kill him. Its main concern is with the good man and how he should pursue the good life. The treatise is therefore central to our understanding of Plotinus' ethical theory, and (...)
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  24. Alfred R. Mele (1985). Aristotle on Akrasia, Eudaimonia, and the Psychology of Action. History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (4):375 - 393.score: 9.0
  25. Nicholas D. Smith (2001). Some Thoughts About the Origins of ``Greek Ethics''. Journal of Ethics 5 (1):3-20.score: 9.0
    In this paper, I argue that several of the main issues that became a focus for classical Greek philosophy were initially framed by Homer. In particular, Homer identifies a tension between justice and individual excellence, and problematizes the connection between the heroic conception of excellence and ``eudaimonia'''' (happiness). The later philosophers address the problems raised in Homer by profoundly transforming the way each of these terms was to be conceived.
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  26. Roopen Majithia (2005). On the Eudemian and Nicomachean Conceptions of Eudaimonia. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3):365-388.score: 9.0
    The gathering consensus on the inclusive/exclusive debate regarding happiness in the Nicomachean Ethics seems to be that both sides of the story are partly right. For while the life of happiness (understood as the total life of an individual) is inclusive of ethical and contemplative virtue among other things, the central activity of happiness is exclusively contemplation. The discussions of the Eudemian Ethics, on the other hand, seem to suggest that this text is broadly inclusive. The view I defend here (...)
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  27. Geoffrey Allan Plauché, 16. “Immanent Politics, Participatory Democracy, and the Pursuit of Eudaimonia“.score: 9.0
    This paper builds on the burgeoning tradition of Aristotelian liberalism. It identifies and critiques a fundamental inequality inherent in the nature of the state and, in particular, the liberal representative-democratic state: namely, an institutionalized inequality in authority. The analysis draws on and synthesizes disparate philosophical and political traditions: Aristotle’s virtue [...].
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  28. Deal W. Hudson (1993). Human Nature and Eudaimonia in Aristotle. International Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):128-130.score: 9.0
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  29. Jiyuan Yu (2001). Aristotle on "Eudaimonia": After Plato's "Republic". History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (2):115 - 138.score: 9.0
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  30. Marcus Hester (1991). Aristotle on the Function of Man in Relation to Eudaimonia. History of Philosophy Quarterly 8 (1):3 - 14.score: 9.0
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  31. Josiah Ober (2007). Natural Capacities and Democracy as a Good-in-Itself. Philosophical Studies 132 (1):59 - 73.score: 9.0
    Democracy is shown to be a non-instrumental good-in-itself (as well as an instrument in securing other goods) by extrapolation from the Aristotelian premise that humans are political animals. Because humans are by nature language-using, as well as sociable and common-end-seeking beings, the capacity to associate in public decisions is constitutive of the human being-kind. Association in decision is necessary (although insufficient) for happiness in the sense of eudaimonia. A benevolent dictator who satisfied all other conditions of justice, harms her (...)
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  32. Joseph Margolis (1958). Kafka Vs. Eudaimonia and Duty. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 19 (1):27-42.score: 9.0
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  33. Don Adams (2014). Sophia, Eutuchia and Eudaimonia in the Euthydemus. Apeiron 47 (1):1-33.score: 9.0
    Name der Zeitschrift: Apeiron Jahrgang: 47 Heft: 1 Seiten: 48-80.
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  34. Pierluigi Donini (1994). Due libri su eudaimonia in Aristotel. [REVIEW] Phronesis 39 (1):98-110.score: 9.0
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  35. Barrie Fleet (2009). Philosophy (K.) McGroarty Plotinus on Eudaimonia. A Commentary on Ennead 1.4. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. Xxiii + 236. £53. 9780199287123. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:244-.score: 9.0
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  36. Dorothea Frede (1999). Der Begriff der "Eudaimonia" in Platons Philebos. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 53 (3):329 - 354.score: 9.0
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  37. David L. Norton (1972). "Eudaimonia" and the Pain-Displeasure Contingency Argument. Ethics 82 (4):314-320.score: 9.0
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  38. Timothy Dean Roche (1988). Ergon and Eudaimonia in Nicomachean Ethics I: Reconsidering the Intellectualist Interpretation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):175-194.score: 9.0
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  39. Geert Van Cleemput (2006). Aristotle on Eudaimonia in Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 30:127-57.score: 9.0
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  40. Matthew Freytag (1993). The Formal Character of Eudaimonia. Southwest Philosophy Review 9 (2):79-88.score: 9.0
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  41. R. A. H. King (2010). Plotinus on Eγδaimonia (K.) McGroarty (Ed., Trans.) Plotinus on Eudaimonia. A Commentary on Ennead 1.4. Pp. Xxiv + 236. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-19-928712-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):88-.score: 9.0
  42. Pierluigi Donini (1994). Due libri su eudaimonia in Aristotele. [REVIEW] Phronesis 39 (1):98 - 110.score: 9.0
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  43. Giannis Stamatellos (2010). Plotinus on Eudaimonia. Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):207-209.score: 9.0
  44. Donald G. Richards (2013). Eudaimonia, Economics and the Environment: What Do the Hellenistic Thinkers Have to Teach Economists About 'The Good Life'? Ethics and the Environment 18 (2):33-53.score: 9.0
    The concept of “the good life” is not one that receives much attention from conventional economic theory.1 About the closest it comes to such attention is in the area of welfare economics and here it is mostly concerned with the distribution of costs and benefits of various economic choices and wherein benefits are measured in terms of utility and costs in terms of disutility or utility foregone. It is usually taken for granted that utility is a function of consumption of (...)
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  45. Jean Roberts (2005). Well-Being L. J. Jost, R. A. Shiner (Edd.): Eudaimonia and Well-Being. Ancient and Modern Conceptions . Pp. Xxxiv + 198. Kelowna, BC: Academic Printing and Publishing, 2003 (First Published as Apeiron 35/4, 2002). Paper, Can$24.95 (Cased, Can$64.95). ISBN: 0-920980-79-1 (0-920980-78-3 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):447-.score: 9.0
  46. Ingeborg Schüssler (1992). La Question de l'Eudaimonia Dans L'Éthique a Nicomaque d'Aristote. Études Phénoménologiques 8 (16):79-102.score: 9.0
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  47. J. L. Ackrill (1975). Aristotle on Eudaimonia. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
     
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  48. D. J. Allan (1976). Aristotle on Eudaimonia. Philosophical Books 17 (3):106-109.score: 9.0
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  49. A. Bertozzi (2007). Kieran McGroarty, Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead I. 4. Philosophy in Review 27 (5):364.score: 9.0
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