15 found
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  1.  46
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1998). The Neuropsychological Basis of Religions, or Why God Won't Go Away. Zygon 33 (2):187-201.
  2.  23
    Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (2000). The Neuropsychology of Religious and Spiritual Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):251-266.
    This paper considers the neuropsychology of religious and spiritual experiences. This requires a review of our current understanding of brain function as well as an integrated synthesis to derive a neuropsychological model of spiritual experiences. Religious and spiritual experiences are highly complex states that likely involve many brain structures including those involved in higher order processing of sensory and cognitive input as well as those involved in the elaboration of emotions and autonomic responses. Such an analysis can help elucidate the (...)
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  3.  25
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (2000). The Neuropsychology of Aesthetic, Spiritual, and Mystical States. Zygon 35 (1):39-51.
  4. Charles D. Laughlin & Eugene G. D'aquili (1974). Biogenetic Structuralism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5.  28
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1993). Religious and Mystical States: A Neuropsychological Model. Zygon 28 (2):177-200.
  6.  18
    Eugene G. D'Aquili (1978). The Neurobiological Bases of Myth and Concepts of Deity. Zygon 13 (4):257-274.
  7.  7
    Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (1994). The Near Death Experience as Archetype: A Model for "Prepared" Neurocognitive Processes. Anthropology of Consciousness 5 (4):1-15.
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  8.  10
    Eugene G. D'aquili (1983). The Myth-Ritual Complex: A Biogenetic Structural Analysis. Zygon 18 (3):247-269.
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  9.  13
    Eugene G. D'Aquili (1982). Senses of Reality in Science and Religion: A Neuroepistemological Perspective. Zygon 17 (4):361-384.
    . The phenomenology of certain mystical states is contrasted with the sense of “baseline” reality in an exploration of primary senses of reality. Nine theoretical and eight actual primary senses of reality are described. A neurophysiological model is presented to account for these states, and their possible adaptive significance is considered from an evolutionary perspective. Finally the state of absolute unitary being is contrasted with baseline reality, and their competing claims for primacy are evaluated in an epistemological context.
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  10.  11
    Eugene G. D'Aquili (1993). Apologia Pro Scriptura Sua, or Maybe We Got It Right After All. Zygon 28 (2):251-266.
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  11.  12
    Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (2000). The Creative Brain/The Creative Mind. Zygon 35 (1):53-68.
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  12.  14
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1996). Consciousness and the Machine. Zygon 31 (2):235-52.
  13.  12
    Charles D. Laughlin, John McManus & Eugene G. D'Aquili (1993). Mature Contemplation. Zygon 28 (2):133-176.
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  14.  10
    Eugene G. D'Aquili (1994). The Summa Hefneriana: Myth, Megamyth, and Metamyth. Zygon 29 (3):371-381.
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  15.  8
    Eugene G. D'Aquili (1985). Human Ceremonial Ritual and the Modulation of Aggression. Zygon 20 (1):21-30.
    . Human ceremonial ritual is considered as an evolved behavior, one of the principal effects of which is the promotion of intragroup cohesion by decreasing or eliminating intragroup aggression. It is seen as a major determinant of what Victor Turner calls communitas in human social groups of varying extension. The frequent paradoxical effect of ritual's promoting extragroup aggression at the same time that it diminishes intragroup aggression is considered. A neuroevolutionary model of the development and social effects of ritual behavior (...)
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