Search results for 'European Convention on Human Rights' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 1098.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Commission European (1999). European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies; Human Tissue Banks; Human Embryo Research. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 5 (1):1.score: 906.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Parliament European (2000). European Parliament Resolution on Human Cloning. Medicínska Etika a Bioetika: Časopis Ústavu Medicínskej Etiky a Bioetiky= Medical Ethics and Bioethics: Journal of the Institute of Medical Ethics & Bioethics 7 (1-2):18.score: 876.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Danutė Jočienė (2010). Protection of Human Rights under the European Convention on Human Rights and the European Union Law (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 121 (3):97-113.score: 468.0
    The system of the European Convention on Human Rights created in 1950 is still regarded as the most important and effective regional system for the protection of human rights in the whole world. However, the experience of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has clearly showed that the steady growth in the number of cases brought before the ECHR makes it increasingly difficult to keep the length of proceedings within the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Stefan Kirchner (2012). The Confessional Secret Between State Law and Canon Law and the Right to Freedom of Religion Under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1317-1326.score: 468.0
    Within the Irish government there is a discussion regarding the possibility of limiting the legal protection afforded to the confessional secret. This paper addresses the question of whether this suggestion, if it were to be implemented by the legislature, would be compatible with the right to religious freedom under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). This text will also highlight the role of the confessional secret in canon law and the protection of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Toma Birmontiene (2010). Intersection of the Jurisprudences. The European Convention on Human Rights and the Constitutional Doctrine Formulated by the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Lithuania. Jurisprudence 119 (1):7-27.score: 468.0
    The article discusses the certain features of the constitutional doctrine of human rights developed by the Constitutional Court of Lithuania which were influenced by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, the role of the European Convention on Human Rights as a legal source in the system of sources of constitutional law. The intersection of the jurisprudences, which came into being due to different assessments of the legal regulation in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Stefan Kirchner & Katarzyna Geler-Noch (2012). Compensation under the European Convention on Human Rights for Expropriations Enforced Prior to the Applicability of the Convention. Jurisprudence 19 (1):21-29.score: 468.0
    Forced expropriations of immovable property were common during the Communist era in Eastern Europe. Today, many of the former owners or their heirs are interested in regaining legal ownership of such properties, often decades after the ownership has been reallocated to others. Therefore, the conflict between old and new owners is often resolved in favour of the new owners. While this is understandable from a contemporary political perspective, this approach results in a perpetuation of the results of an earlier (...) rights violation, thereby resulting in a new human rights violation which will have to be measured against the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) if the state in question has ratified it prior to deciding how to handle the long-term effects of expropriations. Firstly, in the article we will devote ourselves to the interpretation of the right to property with an emphasis on the problem of expropriation. Above all, we will elaborate on the definition of the term “property” as well as positive and negative obligations of the Member States regarding this right. Finally, we will address the question of expropriations prior to the entry into force of the Convention and just compensation under Article 41 ECHR. Interpretation of the right to property will be supported by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. (shrink)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Regina Valutytė (2012). State Liability for the Infringement of the Obligation to Refer for a Preliminary Ruling under the European Convention on Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (1):7-20.score: 468.0
    The article deals with the question whether a state might be held liable for the infringement of the European Convention on Human Rights if its national court of last instance fails to implement the obligation to make a reference for a preliminary ruling to the Court of Justice of the European Union under the conditions laid down in Article 267 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and developed in the case-law (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Lijana Štarienė (2009). The Limits of the Use of Undercover Agents and the Right to a Fair Trial Under Article 6(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 117 (3):263-284.score: 466.8
    Various special investigative methods are more often applied nowadays; their use is unavoidably induced by today’s reality in combating organised crime in the spheres such as corruption, prostitution, drug trafficking, trafficking in persons, money counterfeit and etc. Therefore, special secret investigative methods are more often used and they are very effective in gathering evidence for the purpose of detecting and investigating very well-organised or latent crimes. Both the Convention on the Protection on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Francesco De Santis di Nicola (2011). Principle of Subsidiarity and 'Embeddedness' of the European Convention on Human Rights in the Field of the Reasonable-Time Requirement: The Italian Case. Jurisprudence 18 (1):7-32.score: 403.2
    The right to ‘domestic remedies’, which ideally connects ‘subsidiarity’ and ‘embeddedness’ of the ECHR in the legal systems of member States, is deemed to play a crucial role for the Strasbourg machinery survival as well as for an effective protection of human rights, especially in the field of the ‘reasonable-time’ requirement. In this respect the Italian case seems an excellent test. Once a compensatory remedy was introduced in the Italian legal system by Law No. 80 of 2001 (the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Justinas Žilinskas & Dovilė Gailiūtė (2012). Review of Judgments of the European Court of Human Rights in Cases Against the Republic of Lithuania in 2011. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 19 (1):369-390.score: 320.4
    In 2011 the European Court of Human Rights delivered 10 judgments in cases against the Republic of Lithuania. In 9 judgments the Court found at least one violation of rights and freedoms guaranteed by the European Convention on Human Rights. Article 6 which provides the right to a fair trial, remains dominant in the applications against Lithuania, since in 7 out of 10 delivered judgments the Court declared violations of Article 6 (mostly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Loreta Šaltinytė (2010). European Union Accession to the European Convention on Human Rights: Stronger Protection of Fundamental Rights in Europe? Jurisprudence 120 (2):177-196.score: 318.0
    The treaty of Lisbon makes European Union (EU) accession to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) an obligation of result. The issue has been intensely discussed for more than thirty years, arguing that such accession is necessary in view of the need to ensure the ECHR standard of fundamental rights protection in Europe. This question again gains prominence as the EU member states and the institutions seek to agree on the negotiation directives of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Maurizio Mori & Demetrio Neri (2001). Perils and Deficiencies of the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (3):323 – 333.score: 312.0
    The authors analyze deficiencies and perils of the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine , in particular the concept of human rights as given by natural law and the Conventions stand on germline therapy and its refutation of therapeutic enhancement.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Astrid Sanders (2013). Does Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights Apply to Disciplinary Procedures in the Workplace? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (4):791-819.score: 312.0
    Remarkably, there have been three decisions by the Court of Appeal and one decision by the Supreme Court (including notably R(G) v Governors of X School) in the space of three years on the same question as to whether the procedural guarantees of Article 6 European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) can apply to disciplinary proceedings in the workplace. The earlier recent domestic decisions held that Article 6(1) could apply or did apply to workplace disciplinary procedures (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. George Letsas (2007). A Theory of Interpretation of the European Convention on Human Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 312.0
    Does the right to life under article 2 ECHR include the right to terminate one's life? Does the right to private life under article 8 ECHR include the right to sleep at night free from airplane noise? Does the right to property under article 1 Protocol 1 ECHR entitle the former King of Greece to claim compensation for the expropriation of royal property, following a referendum? Do homosexual couples have a right to adopt under article 8 ECHR? This book looks (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jane Wright (1998). Local Authorities, the Duty of Care and the European Convention on Human Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18 (1):1-28.score: 312.0
    This article examines the criteria for determining when a local authority owes a duty of care at Common Law, concurrent with statutory obligations, in light of the decisions of the House of Lords in X (Minors) v Bedfordshire County Council and M (A Minor) v Newham Borough Council. The various policy arguments employed by their Lordships are analysed and located within current debate regarding the purpose and scope of the tort of negligence. It is argued that, in relevant circumstances, English (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Lyra Jakulevičienė & Vladimiras Siniovas (2013). Protection under the European Convention on Human Rights – Oasis for Asylum Seekers in Europe? Jurisprudence 20 (3):855-899.score: 310.2
    Even though the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR) does not explicitly address the rights of asylum seekers and refugees, the case law of the European Human Rights Court (ECtHR) confirms that their rights can be successfully defended under this mechanism. In parallel, in its evolving jurisprudence on asylum the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) refers to the Strasbourg case law, where there is (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Steven Greer (2003). Constitutionalizing Adjudication Under the European Convention on Human Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (3):405-433.score: 283.8
    The primary function of the European Court of Human Rights is to ensure that administrative and judicial processes in member states effectively conform to pan‐European Convention standards (‘constitutional justice’) rather than seeking to provide every deserving applicant with a remedy for a Convention violation (‘individual justice’). But, in order to do so effectively some core elements of the Convention's constitution require more deliberate articulation and more consistent application. In seeking to show how this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Indrė Pukanasytė (2009). Some Aspects Related to the Interpretation of the Right to Free Elections in the Case-Law of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 115 (1):155-182.score: 262.8
    The paper focuses on the general principles established in the caselaw of the European Court of Human Rights while applying and interpreting the Article 3 of the First Protocol of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms which provides: „The High Contracting Parties undertake to hold free elections at reasonable intervals by secret ballot, under conditions which will ensure the free expression of the opinion of the people in the choice (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Rick Lawson (2010). Pt. 1. Setting the Scene: Human Rights and Health Ethics. Dwelling on the Threshold: On the Interaction Between the European Convention on Human Rights and the Biomedicine Convention. [REVIEW] In André den Exter (ed.), Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu.score: 247.2
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Burleigh Wilkins (2002). International Human Rights and National Discretion. Journal of Ethics 6 (4):373-382.score: 243.0
    This paper argues that the EuropeanCourt of Human Rights couldserve as a model for an international court ofhuman rights to be builtupon the United Nations Committee on HumanRights. It argues that theconcerns states might have over the surrenderof a significant portion oftheir national sovereignity might be lessenedif such an internationalcourt were to incorporate the margin ofappreciation doctrine employed bythe European Court of Human Rights. Thisdoctrine is intended to respectthe customs and traditions of sovereign statesin (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Justina Nasutavičienė (2013). The Right to Confidentiality of Communications Between a Lawyer and a Client During Investigation of EU Competition Law Violations: The Aspect of the Status of a Lawyer. Jurisprudence 20 (1):39-55.score: 235.8
    For the purposes of this article, the right to confidentiality of communications between a lawyer and a client (legal professional privilege) is analysed and understood as a rule under which, in judicial or administrative proceedings, the content of communications between a lawyer and his client shall not be disclosed; if this rule is breached, the content of the communications in question is not treated as evidence in the process. Legal professional privilege is related to several articles of the Convention (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Rosie Harding (2007). Sir Mark Potter And The Protection Of The Traditional Family: Why Same Sex Marriage Is (Still) A Feminist Issue. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 15 (2):223-234.score: 234.0
    In Wilkinson v. Kitzinger, the petitioner (Susan Wilkinson) sought a declaration of her marital status, following her marriage to Celia Kitzinger in British Columbia, Canada in August 2003. The High Court refused the application, finding that their valid Canadian marriage is, in United Kingdom law, a civil partnership. In this note, I focus on Sir Mark Potter’s adjudication of the human rights issues under Articles 8, 12 and 14 of the European Convention on Human (...) (E.C.H.R.), highlighting his restatement of the ideology of the ‹traditional’ family as natural, normative and desirable. I argue that this case shows that the exclusion of same sex couples from marriage is a feminist issue, because denying same sex couples access to marriage works to sediment patriarchal ideas and re-inscribe gender roles within the family. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Stefan Kirchner (2013). Natural Law as Biolaw. Jurisprudence 20 (1):23-39.score: 234.0
    This article investigates the use of natural law in biolaw from the specific perspective of an attorney practising before the European Court of Human Rights. Starting from an exploration of the question of who is a human and thereby to be protected under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), particular emphasis is placed on the right to life under Art. 2(1) ECHR. It is shown that natural law can – and should (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. A. Young (2000). Fact, Opinion, and the Human Rights Act 1998: Does English Law Need to Modify its Definition of 'Statements of Opinion' to Ensure Compliance with Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights? [REVIEW] Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 20 (1):89-107.score: 234.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ton Meijers (2013). Religious Freedom in the European Union: The Application of the European Convention on Human Rights in the European Union, Proceedings of the 19th Meeting of the European Consortium for Church and State Research Nicosia (Cyprus), 15 –18 November 2007, Leuven, Paris, Edited by Achilles Emilianides. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (2):166-167.score: 234.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Stephanie Palmer (1997). Rape in Marriage and the European Convention on Human Rights CR V. UK and SW V. UK. Feminist Legal Studies 5 (1):91-97.score: 234.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. G. R. Sullivan (2005). Strict Liability for Criminal Offences in England and Wales Following Incorporation Into English Law of the European Convention on Human Rights. In Andrew Simester (ed.), Appraising Strict Liability. Oup Oxford.score: 234.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jacqueline A. Laing (2005). The Mental Capacity Bill 2004: Human Rights Concerns. Family Law Journal 35:137-143.score: 224.4
    The Mental Capacity Bill endangers the vulnerable by inviting human rights abuse. It is perhaps these grave deficiencies that prompted the warnings of the 23rd Report of the Joint Committee on Human Rights highlighting the failure of the legislation to supply adequate safeguards against Articles 2, 3 and 8 incompatibilities. Further, the fact that it is the mentally incapacitated as a class that are thought ripe for these and other kinds of intervention, highlights the Article 14 (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Solveiga Cirtautienė (2013). Impact of Human Rights on Private Law in Lithuania and Other European Countries: Problematic Aspects. Jurisprudence 20 (1):77-90.score: 223.2
    The aim of this article is to investigate the problem how and to what extent human rights affect the relationships between private parties and what consequences this effect has for the development of private law in Lithuania and other European countries. Because Lithuanian legal doctrine lacks relevant research on this subject-matter, the author seeks to start and invoke the beginning of conceptual academic discourse on the matter. It is argued that despite the fact that in many countries (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Martin Reufels & Karl Molle (2012). Labour Law Within the Recent Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1567-1583.score: 222.0
    The article deals with the impact of the recent jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on the German labour law practice. After a brief introduction of the general importance of the jurisprudence of the ECHR for the German labour law (I.), the authors illustrate the German and the ECHR’s jurisprudence on the duty of loyalty towards the ecclesiastic employer (II.) and whistle blowing (III.). Analysing this jurisprudence, the authors come to the conclusion that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ian Leigh (2011). Damned If They Do, Damned If They Don't: The European Court of Human Rights and the Protection of Religion From Attack. Res Publica 17 (1):55-73.score: 221.4
    The approach of the European Court of Human Rights to cases of religiously offensive expression is inconsistent and unsatisfactory. A critical analysis of the Court’s jurisprudence on blasphemy, religious insult and religious hatred identifies three problems with its approach in this field. These are: the embellishment and over-emphasis of freedom of religion, the use of the margin of appreciation and the devaluing of some forms of offensive speech. Nevertheless, it is possible to defend a more coherent approach (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jill Marshall (2008). Women's Right to Autonomy and Identity in European Human Rights Law: Manifesting One's Religion. Res Publica 14 (3):177-192.score: 220.2
    Freedom of religious expression is to many a fundamental element of their identity. Yet the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights on the Islamic headscarf issue does not refer to autonomy and identity rights of the individual women claimants. The case law focuses on Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which provides a legal human right to freedom of religious expression. The way that provision is interpreted (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Rosemary Auchmuty (2009). Beyond Couples. Feminist Legal Studies 17 (2):205-218.score: 205.8
    Two elderly sisters who lived together complained of discrimination on the ground that, when one of them died, the other would face a heavy inheritance tax bill, unlike the survivor of a marriage or civil partnership who enjoys a “spousal exemption” under the Inheritance Tax Act 1984. They lost in both the lower chamber of the European Court of Human Rights and on appeal to the Grand Chamber. At first instance, discrimination was found but held to be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Dana Zartner & Jennifer Ramos (2011). Human Rights as Reputation Builder: Compliance with the Convention Against Torture. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (1):71-92.score: 203.4
    A strong record of human rights protections is an important factor for a state to maintain a positive international reputation. In this article, we suggest that states will use compliance with human rights treaties as a mechanism by which to improve their reputations to help achieve their foreign policy goals. We hypothesize that international human rights compliance is a means to improve a state’s reputation in three specific situations: when the state is facing regional (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. F. William Dommel & Duane Alexander (1997). The Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine of the Council of Europe. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (3):259-276.score: 201.6
    : The Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine developed by the Council of Europe, now undergoing ratification, is the first international treaty focused on bioethics. This article describes the background of the Convention's development and its general provisions and provides a comparison of its requirements with those of federal regulations governing research with human subjects. Although most provisions are comparable, there are significant differences in scope and applicability, for example, in the areas of compensation for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Margaret DeMerieux (2001). Deriving Environmental Rights From the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (3):521-561.score: 196.8
    This article examines the way in which the organs of the European Human Rights Convention have dealt with cases involving ‘the environment’ in the absence of any environmental (human) right or rights in the Convention. Some theoretical approaches to ‘human rights and the environment’ are examined and the possible formulation of an environmental right or rights, their scope and content are discussed as a preliminary to the examination of the way (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Edita Gruodytė (2012). Legal Aspects of Regulation of Abortion in the Context of Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (2):739-752.score: 193.8
    Regulatory approach to the right to abortion in Europe is diverse and basically related to the issue of when the right to life begins and how this question is reflected in national legislation. Such an approach and diversity is tolerated by the European Court of Human Rights, but only if some specific standards and criteria formulated in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights are reflected in national legislation. Research of the Lithuanian (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Gabriel Andreescu & Liviu Andreescu (2010). The European Court of Human Rights' Lautsi Decision: Context, Contents, Consequences. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (26):47-74.score: 193.8
    The paper discusses the context, substance and likely implications of the European Court of Human Rights’ very recent but, in our view, historic decision in the case of Lautsi v. Italy. The article offers an outline of the case and of the decision’s motivation, a presentation of the responses, and a brief discussion of its relevance to the similar Romanian case. We examine in some detail the objections leveled against the ruling, track the progress of the Court’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Susan M. Easton (2002). Feminist Perspectives on the Human Rights Act: Two Cheers for Incorporation. Res Publica 8 (1):21-40.score: 190.2
    This paper considers feministperspectives on the Human Rights Act. Itdiscusses the reasons why many feminists aresceptical regarding the impact the Act willhave on women''s lives, including theimplications for anti-discrimination law,problems with the framework of rights in theEuropean Convention and deeper difficulties facingfeminism in negotiating rights discourse. Whileacknowledging these problems, it is argued thatthere are grounds for a more positiveinterpretation of incorporation. Questions arethen raised about the nature and scope of rightsand the role of the state (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Aistė Račkauskaitė-Burneikienė (2013). The Impact of General Human Rights on the Protection of Persons Belonging to National Minorities. Jurisprudence 20 (3):923-950.score: 190.2
    The protection of national minorities forms a constituent part of the international protection of human rights. General human rights treaties (the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and others) create guarantees for the protection of persons belonging to national minorities on the basis of individual human rights. Although the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kieran Oberman (2013). Beyond Sectarianism? On David Miller's Theory of Human Rights. Res Publica 19 (3):275-283.score: 189.0
    In his most recent book, National Responsibility and Global Justice, David Miller presents an account of human rights grounded on the idea of basic human needs. Miller argues that his account can overcome what he regards as a central problem for human rights theory: the need to provide a ‘non-sectarian’ justification for human rights, one that does not rely on reasons that people from non-liberal societies should find objectionable. The list of human (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Aistė Akstinienė (2013). Reservations to Human Rights Treaties: Problematic Aspects Related to Gender Issues. Jurisprudence 20 (2):451-468.score: 187.2
    In this article the author analyses specific reservations that are being done to the international documents for the protection of human rights and whether Vienna Convention on the Law of the Treaties applies to those human rights treaties or not. Also, the author analyses if reservations, which are incompatible with object and purpose of the treaty, can be done or not and what consequences they might bring. For this reason the author describes the practice of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Courtney Hillebrecht (2012). Implementing International Human Rights Law at Home: Domestic Politics and the European Court of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (3):279-301.score: 186.0
    The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) boasts one of the strongest oversight systems in international human rights law, but implementing the ECtHR’s rulings is an inherently domestic and political process. This article begins to bridge the gap between the Court in Strasbourg and the domestic process of implementing the Court’s rulings by looking at the domestic institutions and politics that surround the execution of the ECtHR’s judgments. Using case studies from the UK and Russia, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Pablo Gilabert (2013). The Capability Approach and the Debate Between Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. A Critical Survey. Human Rights Review 14 (4):299-325.score: 185.4
    This paper provides a critical exploration of the capability approach to human rights (CAHR) with the specific aim of developing its potential for achieving a synthesis between “humanist” or “naturalistic” and “political” or “practical” perspectives in the philosophy of human rights. Section II presents a general strategy for achieving such a synthesis. Section III provides an articulation of the key insights of CAHR (its focus on actual realizations given diverse circumstances, its pluralism of grounds, its emphasis (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Toma Birmontienė (2012). The Influence of Economic Crisis on the Constitutional Doctrine of Social Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1005-1030.score: 185.4
    The article underlines the significance of social rights as important constitutional rights of a human being and emphasises the peculiarities of their nature from the point of view of not only national, but also international law. The article presents an analysis of the constitutional doctrine of the protection of guarantees of social rights, which has been formulated by the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Lithuania in the course of considering the issues of reduction of social (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. J. C. Byk (1997). A Proposed Draft Protocol for the European Convention on Biomedicine Relating to Research on the Human Embryo and Fetus. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (1):32-37.score: 178.2
    The objective of this paper is to stimulate academic debate on embryo and fetal research from the perspective of the drafting of a protocol to the European Convention on Biomedicine. The Steering Committee on Bioethics of the Council of Europe was mandated to draw up such a protocol and for this purpose organised an important symposium on reproductive technologies and embryo research, in Strasbourg from the 16th to the 18th of December 1996.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Elizabeth Victor (2013). Scientific Research and Human Rights: A Response to Kitcher on the Limitations of Inquiry. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-19.score: 176.2
    In his recent work exploring the role of science in democratic societies Kitcher (Science in a democratic society. Prometheus Books, New York, 2011) claims that scientists ought to have a prominent role in setting the agenda for and limits to research. Against the backdrop of the claim that the proper limits of scientific inquiry is John Stuart Mill’s Harm Principle (Kitcher in Science, truth, and democracy. Oxford University Press, New York, 2001), he identifies the limits of inquiry as the point (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Freek van der Vet (2012). Seeking Life, Finding Justice: Russian NGO Litigation and Chechen Disappearances Before the European Court of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (3):303-325.score: 175.8
    This article presents findings from an interview study of human rights practitioners who assist relatives of the disappeared from Chechnya with their complaints before the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). These practitioners work for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The study contributes to the scant literature on NGO litigation before the ECtHR and to the social scientific literature on how human rights are actively practiced. It investigates the NGOs’ intermediary position between the ECtHR and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Hans Christian Günther & Andrea A. Robiglio (eds.) (2010). The European Image of God and Man: A Contribution to the Debate on Human Rights. Brill.score: 175.8
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000