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Eva Brann [19]Eva T. H. Brann [17]Eva T. Brann [1]
  1. Jacob Klein, Eva Brann & J. Winfree Smith (1969). Greek Mathematical Thought and the Origin of Algebra. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 20 (4):374-375.
     
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  2. Eva T. H. Brann (2004). The Music of the Republic: Essays on Socrates' Conversations and Plato's Writings. Paul Dry Books.
  3.  10
    Eva T. H. Brann (1997). The Insufficiency of Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):136-137.
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  4.  14
    Eva Brann (2002). Review: Japaridze, The Kantian Subject: Sensus Communis, Mimesis, Work of Mourning. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 56 (2):431-433.
  5.  31
    Eva Brann (2005). Are We In Time? And Other Essays on Time and Temporality. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):450-451.
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  6.  39
    Eva Brann (2010). Are the Platonic Doctrines Unwritten Because They Couldn't or Because They Shouldn't Be Published? Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (2):171-179.
    To what extent can philosophy speak to and write about what is most fundamental to itself? This essay sorts through aspects of the problem of Plato's alleged "unwritten doctrine." The essay begins by moving back to Plato's teacher and the non-doctrinal investigations of Socrates, which are grounded in the positing of hypotheses and dialogic questioning. Following this move, the essay turns forward to Plotinus's later, more systematic presentations where the use of terms like “the one” and “the good” are not (...)
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  7.  22
    Eva Brann (2011). Jacob Klein's Two Prescient Discoveries. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 11:144-153.
    I present two of Jacob Klein’s chief discoveries from a perspective of peculiar fascination to me: the enchanting (to me) contemporaneous significance, the astounding prescience, and hence longevity, of his insights. The first insight takes off from an understanding of the lowest segment of the so-called DividedLine in Plato’s Republic. In this lowest segment are located the deficient beings called reflections, shadows, and images, and a type of apprehension associatedwith them called by Klein “image-recognition” (εἰκασία). The second discovery involves a (...)
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  8. Eva Brann (1972). "An Exquisite Platform": Utopia. Interpretation 3 (1):1-26.
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  9.  22
    Eva T. H. Brann (1998). When Does Amorality Become Immorality ? Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):166-170.
  10.  9
    Eva T. H. Brann (1993). The Canon Defended. Philosophy and Literature 17 (2):193-218.
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  11.  17
    Eva Brann (2011). The Human Condition. Review of Metaphysics 64 (4):866-868.
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  12.  8
    Eva Brann (2014). Socrates: Antitragedian. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):30-40.
    To no one will it be news that Socrates is a philosophos, a philosophical man, in the preprofessional sense, when the word was still fully felt as a modifying adjective and was not yet a noun denoting a member of an occupational category, such that philosophia, the love of wisdom, could pass into a dead metaphor. “Dead” metaphors are figures of speech whose figurativeness has been sedimented, covered over by the sands of time, so that their metaphorical force is no (...)
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  13.  17
    Eva T. H. Brann (1999). Tapestry with Images: Paul Scott's Raj Novels. Philosophy and Literature 23 (1):181-196.
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  14.  15
    Eva T. H. Brann (1992). What is Postmodernism? The Harvard Review of Philosophy 2 (1):4-7.
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  15. Eva Brann (1978). The Offense of Socrates: A Re-Reading of Plato's Apology. Interpretation 7 (2):1-21.
     
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  16. Eva T. Brann (1996). The World of the Imagination, Sum and Substance. Utopian Studies 7 (2):222-224.
     
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  17.  11
    Eva Brann (2001). Ameriks, Karl. Kant's Theory of Mind: An Analysis of the Paralogisms of Pure Reason. Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):374-376.
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  18. Eva T. H. Brann (1979). Paradoxes of Education in a Republic. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  19.  18
    Eva T. H. Brann (1996). Mere Reading. Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):383-397.
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  20.  3
    Eva Brann (2002). Japaridze, Tamar. The Kantian Subject: Sensus Communis, Mimesis, Work of Mourning. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 56 (2):431-433.
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  21.  8
    Eva T. H. Brann (1998). Self-Knowledge in the Age of Theory. New Vico Studies 16:101-104.
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  22.  9
    Eva Brann (2012). A Way to Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy Today 6 (3-4):147-158.
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  23.  3
    Eva Brann (1987). Love and Reason: Response to McWilliams. Social Research 54.
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  24. Eva Brann (1975). A Way to Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 6 (3-4):357-371.
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  25.  2
    Eva T. H. Brann (2008). Feeling Our Feelings: What Philosophers Think and People Know. Paul Dry Books.
    By way of preface: on the title -- Passion itself: poetry -- Eros, spirit, pleasure: Plato's beginning -- The passions as extremes: Aristotle as the founder of passion studies -- The pathology and therapy of the passions: stoicism through Cicero -- The passions sited: Thomas Aquinas and the soul in sum -- The passions of the soul as actions of the body: Descartes and the obscurity of clear and distinct ideas -- Human affect as our body's vitality: Spinoza and the (...)
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  26. Eva Brann (2006). Kant's Philosophical Use of Mathematics : Negative Magnitudes. In Stanley Rosen & Nalin Ranasinghe (eds.), Logos and Eros: Essays Honoring Stanley Rosen. St. Augustine's Press
     
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  27.  3
    Eva T. H. Brann (2004). Open Secrets/Inward Prospects: Reflections on World and Soul. Paul Dry Books.
    This collection of aphorisms and thoughts gathers 30 years of observations about the external world and on the nature of our internal selves. Compiled from scraps of paper dating from the early 1970s, these bits of wisdom include notes about the world around us that are often thought, but not often said; sightings of internal vistas and omens; and observations on music, the passage of time, America, the body, domesticity, and intimacy.
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  28. Eva Brann (2001). Time, Conflict, and Human ValuesJ. T. Fraser. Isis 92 (4):774-775.
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  29. Eva Brann (2001). Time, Conflict, and Human Values by J. T. Fraser. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:774-775.
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  30. Eva T. H. Brann, Peter Kalkavage & Eric Salem (eds.) (2007). The Envisioned Life: Essays in Honor of Eva Brann. Paul Dry Books.
     
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  31.  29
    Eva T. H. Brann (2011). The Logos of Heraclitus: The First Philosopher of the West on its Most Interesting Term. Paul Dry Books.
    Eva Brann delves into Heraclitus's famously cryptic saying, "all things come to be in accordance with this Logos.".
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  32. Eva T. H. Brann (1979). The Republic. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  33. Eva T. H. Brann (1999). The Study of Time: Philosophical Truths and Human Consequences. University of Oregon, Humanities Center.
     
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  34. Eva T. H. Brann (2004). The Tyrant's Temperance: Charmides. In The Music of the Republic: Essays on Socrates' Conversations and Plato's Writings. Paul Dry Books
     
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  35.  5
    Eva Brann (2001). The Ways of Naysaying: No, Not, Nothing, and Nonbeing. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No, that diminutive but independent vocable, begins its great role early in human life and never loses it. For not only can it head a negative sentence, announcing its judgement, or answer a question, implying its negated content, it can, and mostly does, in the beginning of speech, express an assertion of the resistant will—sometimes just that and nothing more. Eva Brann explores nothingness in the third book of her trilogy, which has treated imagination, time and now naysaying.
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  36.  25
    Eva T. H. Brann (1999). What, Then, is Time? Rowman & Littlefield.
    The other two consider the abilities to make the absent present and to deny existence, reality, or being. This is a paperbound reprint of a 1999 work. c.
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  37. Eva Brann (1999). What, Then, is Time? Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    'What is time?' Well-known philosopher and intellectual historian, Eva Brann mounts an inquiry into a subject universally agreed to be among the most familiar and the most strange of human experiences. Brann approaches questions of time through the study of ten famous texts by such thinkers as Plato, Augustine, Kant, Husserl, and Heidegger, showing how they bring to light the perennial issues regarding time. She also offers her independent reflections.
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