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  1. Daniel C. Dennett & Eva Jablonka, Review for Journal of Evolutionary Biology.
    predators stalk their chosen prey, and so forth. The genius of “instinct†comes in abundant variety, and breeds true. “It must be in the genesâ€â€“that’s what we tend to conclude. But when we do, we may be jumping to conclusions, because there are other possibilities: the clever behavior we observe could be the do-it-yourself invention or discovery of the individual behaver or it could be a clever trick copied from an elder member of its species, most likely one of its (...)
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  2. Eva Jablonka & Snait Gissis (eds.) (forthcoming). Transformations of Lamarckism: From Subtle Fluids to Molecular Biology. MIT Press.
  3. Eva Jablonka & Marion J. Lamb (2013). Disturbing Dogmas: Biologists and the History of Biology. Science in Context 26 (4):557-571.
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  4. Yuval Laor & Eva Jablonka (2013). The Evolution and Development of Culture. History and Theory 52 (2):290-299.
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  5. Alex Mesoudi, Simon Blanchet, Anne Charmantier, Étienne Danchin, Laurel Fogarty, Eva Jablonka, Kevin N. Laland, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Gerd B. Müller, F. John Odling-Smee & Benoît Pujol (2013). Is Non-Genetic Inheritance Just a Proximate Mechanism? A Corroboration of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis. Biological Theory 7 (3):189-195.
    What role does non-genetic inheritance play in evolution? In recent work we have independently and collectively argued that the existence and scope of non-genetic inheritance systems, including epigenetic inheritance, niche construction/ecological inheritance, and cultural inheritance—alongside certain other theory revisions—necessitates an extension to the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis (MS) in the form of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). However, this argument has been challenged on the grounds that non-genetic inheritance systems are exclusively proximate mechanisms that serve the ultimate function of calibrating organisms (...)
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  6. Eva Jablonka & Simona Ginsburg (2012). Scaffolding Emotions and Evolving Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):154-155.
    We suggest that, in animals, the core-affect system is linked to partially assimilated behavioral dispositions that act as developmental scaffolds for the ontogenetic construction of emotions. We also propose that in humans the evolution of language altered the control of emotions, leading to categories that can be adequately captured only by emotion-words.
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  7. Simona Ginsburg & Eva Jablonka (2010). Experiencing: A Jamesian Approach. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (5-6):5-6.
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  8. Eva Jablonka (2009). The Nervous System in Development and Evolution. Bioessays 31 (6):687-689.
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  9. Eva Jablonka & Ehud Lamm (2008). Integrating Evolution and Development: From Theory to Practice. [REVIEW] Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (4):636-47.
    This volume joins a growing list of books, monographs, and proceedings from scientific meetings that attempt to consolidate the wide spectrum of approaches emphasizing the role of development in evolution into a coherent and productive synthesis, often called evo-devo. Evo-devo is seen as a replacement or amendment of the modern synthesis that has dominated the field of evolution since the 1940s and which, as even its architects confessed, was fundamentally incomplete because development remained outside its theoretical framework (Mayr and Provine (...)
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  10. Ehud Lamm & Eva Jablonka (2008). Integrating Evolution and Development: From Theory to Practice. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (4):636-647.
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  11. Ehud Lamm & Eva Jablonka (2008). The Nurture of Nature: Hereditary Plasticity in Evolution. Philosophical Psychology 21 (3):305 – 319.
    The dichotomy between Nature and Nurture, which has been dismantled within the framework of development, remains embodied in the notions of plasticity and evolvability. We argue that plasticity and evolvability, like development and heredity, are neither dichotomous nor distinct: the very same mechanisms may be involved in both, and the research perspective chosen depends to a large extent on the type of problem being explored and the kinds of questions being asked. Epigenetic inheritance leads to transgenerationally extended plasticity, and developmentally-induced (...)
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  12. Simona Ginsburg & Eva Jablonka (2007). The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing. Biological Theory 2 (3):218-230.
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  13. Simona Ginsburg & Eva Jablonka (2007). The Transition to Experiencing: II. The Evolution of Associative Learning Based on Feelings. Biological Theory 2 (3):231-243.
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  14. Eva Jablonka & Marion J. Lamb (2007). Bridging the Gap: The Developmental Aspects of Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):378-389.
    The commentaries on Evolution in Four Dimensions reflect views ranging from total adherence to gene-centered neo-Darwinism, to the acceptance of non-genetic and Lamarckian processes in evolution. We maintain that genetic, epigenetic, behavioral, and cultural variations have all been significant, and that the developmental aspects of heredity and evolution are an important bridge that can unite seemingly conflicting research programs and different disciplines.
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  15. Eva Jablonka & Marion J. Lamb (2007). Précis of Evolution in Four Dimensions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):353-365.
    In his theory of evolution, Darwin recognized that the conditions of life play a role in the generation of hereditary variations, as well as in their selection. However, as evolutionary theory was developed further, heredity became identified with genetics, and variation was seen in terms of combinations of randomly generated gene mutations. We argue that this view is now changing, because it is clear that a notion of hereditary variation that is based solely on randomly varying genes that are unaffected (...)
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  16. Eva Jablonka & Marion J. Lamb (2007). Reply to Wilkins on Review of Evolution in Four Dimensions. Bioessays 29 (3):308-309.
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  17. Eva Jablonka & Marion J. Lamb (2007). The Expanded Evolutionary Synthesis—a Response to Godfrey-Smith, Haig, and West-Eberhard. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):453-472.
    In responding to three reviews of Evolution in Four Dimensions (Jablonka and Lamb, 2005, MIT Press), we briefly consider the historical background to the present genecentred view of evolution, especially the way in which Weismann’s theories have influenced it, and discuss the origins of the notion of epigenetic inheritance. We reaffirm our belief that all types of hereditary information—genetic, epigenetic, behavioural and cultural—have contributed to evolutionary change, and outline recent evidence, mainly from epigenetic studies, that suggests that non-DNA heritable variations (...)
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  18. Eva Jablonka (2006). Genes as Followers in Evolution – a Post-Synthesis Synthesis? Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):143-154.
  19. Eva Jablonka & Eytan Avital (2006). Animal Innovation: The Origins and Effects of New Learned Behaviours. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):135-141.
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  20. Eva Jablonka, Marion J. Lamb & Anna Zeligowski (2006). Evolution in Four Dimensions: Genetic, Epigenetic, Behavioral, and Symbolic Variation in the History of Life. A Bradford Book.
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  21. Eva Jablonka (2004). The Evolution of the Peculiarities of Mammalian Sex Chromosomes: An Epigenetic View. Bioessays 26 (12):1327-1332.
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  22. Arnon Levy & Eva Jablonka (2004). Marcello Barbieri (2003). The Organic Codes: An Introduction to Semantic Biology. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (1).
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  23. Eva Jablonka (2002). Information: Its Interpretation, its Inheritance, and its Sharing. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):578-605.
    The semantic concept of information is one of the most important, and one of the most problematical concepts in biology. I suggest a broad definition of biological information: a source becomes an informational input when an interpreting receiver can react to the form of the source (and variations in this form) in a functional manner. The definition accommodates information stemming from environmental cues as well as from evolved signals, and calls for a comparison between information‐transmission in different types of inheritance (...)
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  24. Eva Jablonka & Marion Lamb (2002). Creating Bridges or Rifts? Developmental Systems Theory and Evolutionary Developmental Biology. Bioessays 24 (3):290-291.
  25. Eva Jablonka, Marjori Matzke, Denis Thieffry & Linda Van Speybroeck (2002). The Genome in Context: Biologists and Philosophers on Epigenetics. Bioessays 24 (4):392-394.
  26. Noretta Koertge, Philip Kitcher, Helen E. Longino, Eva Jablonka, Sungsu Kim, Branden Fitelson & Gábor Hofer‐Szabó (2002). 10. Discussion Note: Distributed Cognition in Epistemic Cultures Discussion Note: Distributed Cognition in Epistemic Cultures (Pp. 637-644). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 69 (4).
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  27. Eva Jablonka & Marion J. Lamb (1998). Bridges Between Development and Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 13 (1):119-124.
    Adaptive evolution is usually assumed to be directed by selective processes, development by instructive processes; evolution involves random genetic changes, development involves induced epigenetic changes. However, these distinctions are no longer unequivocal. Selection of genetic changes is a normal part of development in some organisms, and through the epigenetic system external factors can induce selectable heritable variations. Incorporating the effects of instructive processes into evolutionary thinking alters ideas about the way environmental changes lead to evolutionary change, and about the interplay (...)
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  28. Lia Ettinger, Eva Jablonka & Raphael Falk (1991). On Causality, Heritability and Fitness. Biology and Philosophy 6 (1):27-29.
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  29. Lia Ettinger, Eva Jablonka & Peter McLaughlin (1990). On the Adaptations of Organisms and the Fitness of Types. Philosophy of Science 57 (3):499-513.
    We claim that much of the confusion associated with the "tautology problem" about survival of the fittest is due to the mistake of attributing fitness to individuals instead of to types. We argue further that the problem itself cannot be solved merely by taking fitness as the aggregate cause of reproductive success. We suggest that a satisfying explanation must center not on logical analysis of the concept of general adaptedness but on the empirical analysis of single adapted traits and their (...)
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