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  1.  26
    Eva M. Dadlez (2004). Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure. Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
  2.  13
    Eva M. Dadlez (2009). Comments on Deborah K. Heikes'. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):31-35.
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  3. Eva M. Dadlez (1997). What's Hecuba to Him?: Fictional Events and Actual Emotions. Penn State University Press.
    The goal of this dissertation is to demonstrate that construals of our emotional responses to fictions as irrational or merely pseudo-emotional are not the only explanations available to us, and that necessary and sufficient conditions for an emotional response to a fiction can be established without abandoning either its intentionality or the assignment of a causal role to our beliefs. ;Colin Radford's claim that our emotional responses to fictions are irrational and inconsistent is challenged in two ways. First, distinctions can (...)
     
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  4.  17
    Eva M. Dadlez (2002). The Vicious Habits of Entirely Fictive People: Hume on the Moral Evaluation of Art. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):143-156.
  5.  12
    Eva M. Dadlez (2009). Comments on Deborah K. Heikes' "Let's Be Reasonable. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):31-35.
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  6. Eva M. Dadlez (2016). A Humean Approach to the Problem of Disgust and Aesthetic Appreciation. Essays in Philosophy 17 (1):55-67.
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  7. Eva M. Dadlez (2008). David Hume and Jane Austen on Pride : Ethics in the Enlightenment. In Alexander John Dick & Christina Lupton (eds.), Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Pickering & Chatto