Search results for 'Evan Harris Walker' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William A. Harris & Henry A. Walker (1992). Theory Construction and Development in Sociology: An Appropriate Framework. Sociological Theory 10 (1):111-117.score: 1200.0
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  2. Evan Harris Walker (1992). Cancer as a Mechanism of Hypermutation. Acta Biotheoretica 40 (1).score: 290.0
    The highly structured mechanisms of cancers, their tendency to occur as a response to environmental stress, and the existence of oncogenes, suggest that neoplasticity may represent more than a biological disfunction. It is proposed that cancer exists as a phylogenetic mechanism serving to promote hyperevolution, albeit at the expense of the ontogeny, that is similar to a process recently discovered in bacterial mutations. Cell-surface-associated nucleic acid in tumorigenic cells and sperm cell vectorization of foreign DNA indicate the existence of essential (...)
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  3. Leonard Harris (2013). Walker: Naturalism and Liberation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (1):93-111.score: 150.0
    I am a Walkerite. David Walker (1796– 97/1830), born in Wilmington, Delaware, to a free mother and a slave father, inherited his mother’s status as free. Walker witnessed the misery of slavery in his native state and during his various travels in the South, including one episode where a son was forced to whip his mother until she died. He settled in Boston in the 1820’s where he established a secondhand clothing business and became the most noted abolitionist (...)
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  4. J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  5. Evan J. Livesey & Justin A. Harris (2009). Is There Room for Simple Links in a Propositional Mind? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):212-213.score: 120.0
    Against Mitchell et al.'s assertions, we argue that (1) the concordance between learning and awareness does not support any particular learning theory, (2) their propositional approach is at odds with examples of learned behaviours that contradict beliefs about causation, and (3) the relative virtues of the two approaches in terms of parsimony is more ambiguous than Mitchell et al. suggest.
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  6. Ruth Harris (1977). Marjorie S. Harris - 1976. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 50 (4):314 - 315.score: 120.0
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  7. Joseph Harris (1995). Richard L. Harris, Ed., A Chorus of Grammars: The Correspondence of George Hickes and His Collaborators on the “Thesaurus Linguarum Septentrionalium.”(Publications of the Dictionary of Old English, 4.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1992. Pp. Xviii, 492; Color Frontispiece, 4 Black-and-White Plates. $69. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (1):154-155.score: 120.0
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  8. H. S. Harris (1986). Saggio Sulla Metafisica di Harris. Idealistic Studies 16 (3):262-263.score: 120.0
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  9. Tim Harris (2013). The Intellectual Culture of Puritan Women, 1558–1680. Edited by Johanna Harris and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann. The European Legacy 18 (1):101-102.score: 120.0
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  10. Peter Harris (1984). Controlling Weeds with Pathogens Biological Control of Weeds with Plant Pathogens Raghavan Charudattan H. Lynn Walker. Bioscience 34 (1):53-53.score: 120.0
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  11. Heather Harris (2005). Nobody's Ever Walked Here Before Heather Harris. In Claire Smith & Hans Martin Wobst (eds.), Indigenous Archaeologies: Decolonizing Theory and Practice. Routledge. 280.score: 120.0
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  12. Masato Sasaki, Christiane B. Knobbe, Joshua C. Munger, Evan F. Lind, Dirk Brenner, Anne Brüstle, Isaac S. Harris, Roxanne Holmes, Andrew Wakeham & Jillian Haight (2012). IDH1 (R132H) Mutation Increases Murine Haematopoietic Progenitors and Alters Epigenetics. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 656-659.score: 120.0
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  13. Lenore Ea Walker (2000). Jose M. Prieto, Michel Sabourin, Lenore Ea Walker, Juan I. Aragones, and Maria Amerigo. In Kurt Pawlik & Mark R. Rosenzweig (eds.), International Handbook of Psychology. Sage Publications Ltd.score: 120.0
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  14. Mark Walker (2006). Mark Walker. Minerva 44 (3):241-250.score: 120.0
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  15. Matthew Donald, A Review of The Physics of Consciousness by Evan Harris Walker. [REVIEW]score: 93.0
    At least three books struggle to emerge from this volume. One book, at the level of popular science, leads us through the development of physics, from Newton's laws to Bell's inequalities, in order to argue for the relevance of consciousness to the understanding of quantum theory. This is followed by a sketch of an interpretation of quantum mechanics. Interwoven with both is a memoir of Walker's teenage girlfriend, who died of Hodgkin's disease nearly fifty years ago. The theme which (...)
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  16. Harry Walker (1910). Record of an Experience While Under the Influence of Ether. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 7 (16):437.score: 60.0
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  17. Margaret Urban Walker (2007). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study in Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 40.0
    This is a revised edition of Walker's well-known book in feminist ethics first published in 1997. Walker's book proposes a view of morality and an approach to ethical theory which uses the critical insights of feminism and race theory to rethink the epistemological and moral position of the ethical theorist, and how moral theory is inescapably shaped by culture and history. The main gist of her book is that morality is embodied in "practices of responsibility" that express our (...)
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  18. James A. Harris (2005). Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 40.0
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. (...) puts the eighteenth-century debate about the will and its freedom in the context of the period's concern with applying what Hume calls the "experimental method of reasoning" to the human mind. His book will be of substantial interest to historians of philosophy and anyone concerned with the free will problem. (shrink)
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  19. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Free Riders and Pious Sons – Why Science Research Remains Obligatory. Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.score: 40.0
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The principle (...)
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  20. George W. Harris (2006). Reason's Grief: An Essay on Tragedy and Value. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    In Reason's Grief, George Harris takes W. B. Yeats's comment that we begin to live only when we have conceived life as tragedy as a call for a tragic ethics, something the modern West has yet to produce. He argues that we must turn away from religious understandings of tragedy and the human condition and realize that our species will occupy a very brief period of history, at some point to disappear without a trace. We must accept an ethical (...)
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  21. John Harris (2012). What It's Like to Be Good. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):293-305.score: 40.0
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
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  22. Paul Ernest Walker (1993). Early Philosophical Shiism: The Ismaili Neoplatonism of Abū Yaʻqūb Al-Sijistānī. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    The Ismailis, among whom are the followers of the Aga Khan, rose to prominence during the 4th Islamic/10th Christian century. They developed a remarkably successful intellectual programme to sustain and support their political activities, promoting demands of Islamic doctrine together with the then newly imported sciences from abroad. The high watermark of this intellectual movement is best illustrated in the writings of the Ismaili theoretician Abu Ya´qub al-Sijistani. Using both published and manuscript writings of al-Sijistani that have hitherto been largely (...)
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  23. R. Baine Harris (ed.) (1976). The Significance of Neoplatonism. Distributed by State University of New York Press.score: 40.0
    A Brief Description of Neoplatonism R. Baine Harris Old Dominion University There are essentially three ways in which Neoplatonism may be considered to be ...
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  24. Michelle Boulous Walker (1998). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. Routledge.score: 40.0
    Philosophy and the Maternal Body is a fascinating exploration of an overlooked aspect of feminist thought: what is the role of maternity in philosophy and in what ways has it been used by male theorists to effectively "silence" the voices of women in philosophy? Drawing on rich examples such as Plato's allegory of the cave, Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein's writing on the mother and the mother-daughter relationship, and the psychoanalytic and feminist insights of Irigaray and Kristeva, Michelle Boulous (...) clearly shows how terms such as denial, repression and foreclosure offer crucial insight into the philosophical construction of the maternal body. (shrink)
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  25. Mark A. Schroll & Heather Walker (2011). Diagnosing the Human Superiority Complex: Providing Evidence the Eco-Crisis is Born of Conscious Agency. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):39-48.score: 40.0
    This article is an amendment to Drengson (2011) that offers examples from fieldwork and reporting of practices influenced by the technocratic paradigm. Specifically (1) Krippner's work with Brazilian shamans and the theft of their tribal knowledge by the biotechnology industry that Krippner refers to as ecopiratism. (2) Hitchcock's field research with indigenous populations in the northwestern Kalahari Desert region of southern Africa and his documented assault of these indigenous peoples by private companies that Hitchcock refers to as developmental genocide. And (...)
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  26. Errol E. Harris (2000). Apocalypse and Paradigm: Science and Everyday Thinking. Praeger.score: 40.0
    Harris seeks to diagnose the ailment that infects contemporary thinking and prevents adequate measures from being taken to counter the dangerous effect of the ...
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  27. Nigel Harris (2003). The Return of Cosmopolitan Capital: Globalisation, the State, and War. In the U.S. And Canada Distributed by Palgrave Macmillan.score: 40.0
    Nigel Harris argues that the notion of national capital is becoming redundant as cities and their citizens, increasingly unaffected by borders and national boundaries, take center stage in the economic world. Harris deconstructs this phenomenon and argues for the immense benefits it could and should have, not just for western wealth, but for economies worldwide, for international communication and for global democracy.
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  28. John Harris (2007). Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People. Princeton University Press.score: 40.0
    In Enhancing Evolution, leading bioethicist John Harris dismantles objections to genetic engineering, stem-cell research, designer babies, and cloning and makes an ethical case for biotechnology that is both forthright and rigorous.
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  29. William Walker (1994). Locke, Literary Criticism, and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
    William Walker's original analysis of John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding offers a challenging and provocative assessment of Locke's importance as a thinker, bridging the gap between philosophical and literary-critical discussion of his work. He presents Locke as a foundational figure who defines the epistemological and ontological ground on which eighteenth-century and Romantic literature operate and eventually diverge. He is revealed as a crucial figure for emerging modernity, less the familiar empiricist innovator and more the proto-Nietzschean thinker whose (...)
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  30. David Harris (2003). Teaching Yourself Social Theory. Sage Publications.score: 40.0
    `Social theory is a very difficult subject to teach and it is one that students generally find hard to get to grips with. Teaching Yourself Social Theory offers a highly original and comprehensive resource that will be welcomed by students and teachers alike' - Barry Smart, University of Portsmouth `I have no hesitation in recommending Harris' text to students and teachers of social theory' - Sociology This refreshing and accessible text demonstrates how social theory can be made into an (...)
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  31. Margaret Urban Walker (1993). Thinking Morality Interpersonally: A Reply to Burgess-Jackson. Hypatia 8 (3):167 - 173.score: 40.0
    In a comment on my paper "Feminism, Ethics, and the Question of Theory" (Walker 1992), Keith Burgess-Jackson argues that I have misdiagnosed the problem with modern moral theory. Burgess-Jackson misunderstands both the illustrative-"theoretical-juridical"-model I constructed there and how my critique and alternative model answer to specifically feminist concerns. Ironically, his own view seems to reproduce the very conception of morality as an individually internalized action-guiding code of principles that my earlier essay argued is the conception central to modern (...)
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  32. Michael J. Harris (2013). Audi Rationality and Religious Commitment (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Pp. Xvi + 311. £25.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 960957 4. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):130-134.score: 40.0
    Book Reviews MICHAEL J. HARRIS, Religious Studies , FirstView Article(s).
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  33. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 40.0
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
     
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  34. John Harris (2004). On Cloning. Routledge.score: 40.0
    Cloning - few words have as much potential to grip our imagination or grab the headlines. No longer the stuff of science fiction or Star Wars - it is happening now. Yet human cloning is currently banned throughout the world, and therapeutic cloning banned in many countries. In this highly controversial book, John Harris does a lot more than ask why we are so afraid of cloning. He presents a deft and informed defence of human cloning, carefully exposing the (...)
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  35. Alastair V. Campbell, Raanan Gillon, Julian Savulescu, John Harris, Soren Holm, H. Martyn Evans, David Greaves, Jane Macnaughton, Deborah Kirklin & Sue Eckstein (2013). The Journal of Medical Ethics and Medical Humanities: Offsprings of the London Medical Group. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):667-668.score: 40.0
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  36. Kathleen H. Corriveau, Angie L. Kim, Courtney E. Schwalen & Paul L. Harris (2009). Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children's Differentiation Between Historical and Fantasy Characters. Cognition 113 (2):213-225.score: 40.0
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  37. John Harris (ed.) (2001). Bioethics. OUP Oxford.score: 40.0
    The Oxford Readings in Philosophy series brings together important recent writing in major areas of philosophical enquiry, selected from a variety of sources which may not be conveniently available to the university student or general reader. In this volume, John Harris presents the examples of the very best philosophical writing in bioethics from an internationally renowned list of contributors; authors featured include Peter Singer, Helga Kuhse, Tom Beauchamp, Ruth Macklin, and Ronald Dworkin. The book begins with a substantial overview (...)
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  38. Daniel Harris (2000). Cute, Quaint, Hungry, and Romantic: The Aesthetics of Consumerism. Basic Books.score: 40.0
    Why has the ring of the telephone become a beep? What ever happened to the bumpers and fenders of cars? Why do food commercials never mention hunger?In this encyclopedia of low-brow aesthetics, Daniel Harris concentrates on the nuances of non-art, the uses of the useless, the politics of product design and advertising. We learn how advertisers exaggerate our sensual responses to eating, how close-up nature photography exaggerates the accessibility of the natural world, and how the mutated physiology of dolls (...)
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  39. Sam Harris (2012). Free Will. Free Press.score: 40.0
    A BELIEF IN FREE WILL touches nearly everything that human beings value. It is difficult to think about law, politics, religion, public policy, intimate relationships, morality—as well as feelings of remorse or personal achievement—without first imagining that every person is the true source of his or her thoughts and actions. And yet the facts tell us that free will is an illusion. In this enlightening book, Sam Harris argues that this truth about the human mind does not undermine morality (...)
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  40. Henry Harris (ed.) (1995). Identity: Essays Based on Herbert Spencer Lectures Given in the University of Oxford. Clarendon Press.score: 40.0
    Who am I, and what am I? The question is one asked through the ages, answered in various ways in different disciplines. Identity is a matter of intellectual interest but also of personal and practical interest, attracting attention and stimulating controversy outside the ranks of the specialists. This volume offers a comparison and cross-fertilization of insights and theories from various disciplines in which identity is a key concept. -/- Identity contains essays by six internationally famous contributors, focusing on different facets (...)
     
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  41. Rom Harré & Roy Harris (eds.) (1993). Linguistics and Philosophy: The Controversial Interface. Pergamon Press.score: 40.0
    As hopes that generative linguistics might solve philosophical problems about the mind give way to disillusionment, old problems concerning the relationship between linguistics and philosophy survive unresolved. This collection surveys the historical engagement between the two, and opens up avenues for further reflection. In Part 1 two contrasting views are presented of the interface nowadays called 'philosophy of linguistics'. Part 2 gives a detailed historical survey of the engagement of analytic philosophy with linguistic problems during the present century, and sees (...)
     
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  42. J. W. Harris (2002). Property and Justice. OUP Oxford.score: 40.0
    When philosophers put forward claims for or against 'property', it is often unclear whether they are talking about the same thing that lawyers mean by 'property'. Likewise, when lawyers appeal to 'justice' in interpreting or criticizing legal rules we do not know if they have in mind something that philosophers would recognize as 'justice'. -/- Bridging the gulf between juristic writing on property and speculations about it appearing in the tradition of western political philosophy, Professor Harris has built from (...)
     
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  43. Michele Harris (2013). Striking the Wrong Note: Sixth Anniversary of the Northern Territory Intervention. Australian Humanist, The 112:1.score: 40.0
    Harris, Michele Aboriginal advocate Olga Havnen, in her Lowitja O'Donoghue oration, has asked a critical question. She asks what has been the psychological impact of the Intervention on Aboriginal people of the Northern Territory (NT). It is surprising that so little attention has been given to this critical, yet in some ways tenuous, link before now.
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  44. Sam Harris (2010). The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. Free Press.score: 40.0
    Bestselling author Sam Harris dismantles the most common justification for religious faith-that a moral system cannot be based on science.
     
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  45. Joan Hazelden Walker (1980). Emile Mâle. Religious Art in France. The Twelfth Century: A Study of the Origins of Medieval Iconography, New Edition by Harry Boder; English Translation From the French by M. Matthews, in Bollingen Series Xc: I. Pp. Xxxi + 575; 309 Illustrations. (Princeton: University Press, 1978.) £26.90. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 16 (3):372.score: 40.0
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  46. Tim Futing Liao (1992). Theory Construction and Development in Sociology: A Reply to Willer and to Harris and Walker. Sociological Theory 10 (1):118-121.score: 36.0
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  47. Jaime Nubiola, Walker Percy and Charles S. Peirce: Abduction and Language. Homepage des Arbeitskreises für Abduktionsforschung.score: 18.0
    The American novelist Walker Percy (1916-90) considered himself a "thief of Peirce", because he found in the views of C.S. Peirce, the founder of pragmatism, an alternative approach to prevailing reductionist theories in order to understand what we human beings are and what the peculiar nature of our linguistic activity is. -/- This paper describes, quoting widely from Percy, how abduction is the spontaneous activity of our reason by which we couple meanings and experience in our linguistic expressions. This (...)
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  48. Thomas Douglas (2013). Moral Enhancement Via Direct Emotion Modulation: A Reply to John Harris. Bioethics 27 (3):160-168.score: 18.0
    Some argue that humans should enhance their moral capacities by adopting institutions that facilitate morally good motives and behaviour. I have defended a parallel claim: that we could permissibly use biomedical technologies to enhance our moral capacities, for example by attenuating certain counter-moral emotions. John Harris has recently responded to my argument by raising three concerns about the direct modulation of emotions as a means to moral enhancement. He argues (1) that such means will be relatively ineffective in bringing (...)
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  49. Maria Morris Hambourg, Jeff L. Rosenheim, Douglas Eklund & Mia Fineman (2004). Walker Evans. Princeton University Press.score: 18.0
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