Search results for 'Eve Hartman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Eve Hartman (2012). Do Scientists Care About Animal Welfare? Raintree.
    Looks at animal welfare in society and the sciences, including laboratory animals, pets, and the effect of climate change.
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  2. Edwin Hartman (1996). Organizational Ethics and the Good Life. Oxford University Press.
    Edwin Hartman argues that ethical principles should not derive from abstract theory, but from the real world of experience in organizations. He explains how ethical principles derive from what workers learn in their communities (firms), and that an ethical firm is one that creates the good life for the workers who contribute to its mission. His approach is based on the Aristotelian tradition of refined common sense, from recent work on collective action problems in organizations, and from social contract (...)
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  3.  9
    Laura M. Hartman (2012). The Christian Consumer: Living Faithfully in a Fragile World. OUP Usa.
    Consumption--the flow of physical materials in human lives--is an important ethical issue. Be it fair trade coffee or foreign oil, North Americans' consumption choices affect the well-being of humans around the globe, in addition to impacting the natural world and consumers themselves. In this book, Laura Hartman seeks to formulate a coherent Christian ethic of consumption.
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  4.  5
    Geoffrey H. Hartman (2002). Scars of the Spirit: The Struggle Against Inauthenticity. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this fascinating collection of essays, noted critic Geoffrey Hartman raises the essential question of where we can find the real or authentic in today's world, and how this affects the way we understand our human predicament. Hartman explores such issues as the fantasy of total information and perfect communication encouraged by the internet, the biographical excesses of tell-all talk shows that serve to shore up a personal sense of unreality, the tendency to motivate violence in the name (...)
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  5.  17
    Laura P. Hartman & Moses L. Pava (2005). Sony Online Entertainment: Everquest® or Evercrack? Oxford Style Debate Presented at Tenth Annual International Conference Promoting Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):17-26.
    . Part C of this three part series is the presentation from the Oxford style debate held at the Tenth Annual International Conference Promoting Business Ethics between Laura Hartman, J.D., and Dr. Moses Pava on topics related to the EverQuest® v. EverCrack case. In a traditional Oxford style debate, two debaters take opposing viewpoints and the third debater argues the neutral position. At the Conference, the modified format featured the two debaters presenting diametrically opposing views – corporate responsibility versus (...)
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  6.  9
    David Hartman (1976). Maimonides: Torah and Philosophic Quest. Jewish Publication Society of America.
    In this original study, noted scholar and theologian David Hartman discusses the relation between Maimonides' halakhic writings and The Guide of the Perplexed- ...
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  7.  2
    Geoffrey Hartman (1976). Literary Criticism and Its Discontents. Critical Inquiry 3 (2):203-220.
    Literary criticism is neither more nor less important today than it has been since the becoming an accepted activity in the Renaissance. The humanists of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries created the institution of criticism as we know it: the recovery and analysis of works of art. They printed, edited, and interpreted texts that dated from antiquity and which had been lost or disheveled. Evangelical in their fervor, avid in their search for lost or buried riches, they also put into (...)
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  8.  5
    Robert S. Hartman, Arthur Ellis & Rem B. Edwards (eds.) (2002). The Knowledge of Good: Critique of Axiological Reason. Rodopi.
    This book presents Robert S. Hartman’s formal theory of value and critically examines many other twentieth century value theorists in its light, including A.J. Ayer, Kurt Baier, Brand Blanshard, Paul Edwards, Albert Einstein, William K. Frankena, R.M. Hare, Nicolai Hartmann, Martin Heidegger, G.E. Moore, P.H. Nowell-Smith, Jose Ortega y Gasset, Charles Stevenson, Paul W. Taylor, Stephen E. Toulmin, and J.O. Urmson.
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  9. Geoffrey Hartman (1977). The Recognition Scene of Criticism. Critical Inquiry 4 (2):407-416.
    Wallace Martin's response to "Literary Criticism and Its Discontents" is anything but naive. Its most sophisticated device is to posit my invention of a "naive reader" and to suggest that I would place the New Critics and their heirs in that category. But when I see the movement of criticism after Arnold as exhibiting an anti-self-consciousness principle or being so worried about a hypertrophy of the critical spirit that the spirit is acknowledged only by refusing its seminal or creative force, (...)
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  10.  24
    Lisa Jones Christensen, Ellen Peirce, Laura P. Hartman, W. Michael Hoffman & Jamie Carrier (2007). Ethics, CSR, and Sustainability Education in the Financial Times Top 50 Global Business Schools: Baseline Data and Future Research Directions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):347 - 368.
    This paper investigates how deans and directors at the top 50 global MBA programs (as rated by the "Financial Times" in their 2006 Global MBA rankings) respond to questions about the inclusion and coverage of the topics of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability at their respective institutions. This work purposely investigates each of the three topics separately. Our findings reveal that: (1) a majority of the schools require that one or more of these topics be covered in their MBA (...)
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  11.  1
    Edwin M. Hartman (2015). Rationality in Management Theory and Practice: An Aristotelian Perspective. Philosophy of Management 14 (1):5-16.
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  12.  41
    Robert J. Hartman (forthcoming). Against Luck-Free Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Studies:1-21.
    Every account of moral responsibility has conditions that distinguish between the consequences, actions, or traits that warrant praise or blame and those that do not. One intuitive condition is that praiseworthiness and blameworthiness cannot be affected by luck, that is, by factors beyond the agent’s control. Several philosophers build their accounts of moral responsibility on this luck-free condition, and we may call their views Luck-Free Moral Responsibility (LFMR). I offer moral and metaphysical arguments against LFMR. First, I maintain that considerations (...)
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  13.  6
    Edwin M. Hartman (2011). Virtue, Profit, and the Separation Thesis: An Aristotelian View. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (1):5 - 17.
    If social scientists take natural science as a model, they may err in their predictions and may offer facile ethical views. Maclntyre assails them for this, but he is unduly pessimistic about business, and in rejecting the separation thesis he raises some difficulties about naturalism.Aristotle's views of the good life and of the close relationship between internal and external goods provide a corrective to Maclntyre, and in fact suggest how virtues can support social capital and thus prevail within and among (...)
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  14.  32
    Edwin M. Hartman (2008). Socratic Questions and Aristotelian Answers: A Virtue-Based Approach to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):313 - 328.
    To teach that being ethical requires knowing foundational ethical principles – or, as Socrates claimed, airtight definitions of ethical terms – is to invite cynicism among students, for students discover that no such principles can be found. Aristotle differs from Socrates in claiming that ethics is about virtues primarily, and that one can be virtuous without having the sort of knowledge that characterizes mathematics or natural science. Aristotle is able to demonstrate that ethics and self-interest may overlap, that ethics is (...)
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  15.  40
    Edwin M. Hartman (1998). The Role of Character in Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):547-559.
    There is good reason to take a virtue-based approach to business ethics. Moral principles are fairly useful in assessing actions, but understanding how moral people behave and how they become moral requires reference to virtues, some of which are important inbusiness. We must go beyond virtues and refer to character, of which virtues are components, to grasp the relationship between moralassessment and psychological explanation. Virtues and other character traits are closely related to (in technical terms, they superveneon) personality traits postulated (...)
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  16.  14
    Edwin M. Hartman (2008). Reconciliation in Business Ethics: Some Advice From Aristotle. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (2):253-265.
    It may be nearly impossible to use standard principles to make a decision about a complex ethical case. The best decision, say virtue ethicists in the Aristotelian tradition, is often one that is made by a person of good character who knows the salient facts of the case and can frame the situation appropriately. In this respect ethical decisions and strategic decisions are similar. Rationality plays a role in good ethical decision-making, but virtue ethicists emphasize the importance ofintuitions and emotions (...)
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  17.  2
    Laura P. Hartman, Bill Shaw & Rodney Stevenson (2003). Exploring the Ethics and Economics of Global Labor Standards: A Challenge to Integrated Social Contract Theory. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):193-220.
    The challenge that confronts corporate decision-makers in connection with global labor conditions is often in identifying the standardsby which they should govern themselves. In an effort to provide greater direction in the face of possible global cultural conflicts, ethicistsThomas Donaldson and Thomas Dunfee draw on social contract theory to develop a method for identifying basic human rights: Integrated Social Contract Theory . In this paper, we apply ISCT to the challenge of global labor standards, attempting to identify labor rights that (...)
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  18.  8
    Jerry M. Calton, Patricia H. Werhane, Laura P. Hartman & David Bevan (2013). Building Partnerships to Create Social and Economic Value at the Base of the Global Development Pyramid. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):721-733.
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  19.  97
    Tracy Hartman (forthcoming). Book Review: Preaching and Worship. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (1):106-107.
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  20.  73
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Prospects. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:161-162.
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  21.  9
    Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman (2003). Moral Imagination and the Future of Sweatshops. Business and Society Review 108 (4):425-461.
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  22.  39
    Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman (2005). Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices. Business Ethics 14 (3):206–222.
  23.  21
    Laura P. Hartman & Patricia H. Werhane (2009). A Modular Approach to Business Ethics Integration: At the Intersection of the Stand-Alone and the Integrated Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):295 - 300.
    While no one seems to believe that business schools or their faculties bear entire responsibility for the ethical decision-making processes of their students, these same institutions do have some burden of accountability for educating students surrounding these skills. To that end, the standards promulgated by the Association to Advance Collegiate School of Business , their global accrediting body, require that students learn ethics as part of a business degree. However, since the AACSB does not require the inclusion of a specific (...)
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  24.  20
    Laura P. Hartman, Robert S. Rubin & K. Kathy Dhanda (2007). The Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: United States and European Union Multinational Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):373 - 389.
    This study explores corporate social responsibility (CSR) by conducting a cross-cultural analysis of communication of CSR activities in a total of 16 U.S. and European corporations. Drawing on previous research contrasting two major approaches to CSR initiatives, it was proposed that U.S. companies would tend to communicate about and justify CSR using economic or bottom-line terms and arguments whereas European companies would rely more heavily on language or theories of citizenship, corporate accountability, or moral commitment. Results supported this expectation of (...)
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  25.  9
    Edwin M. Hartman (2001). Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy, and Organizational Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (4):673-685.
    Phillips and Margolis argue that moral philosophy is a poor basis for business ethics, but their narrow view of moral philosophywould exclude Aristotle, for one. They criticize me for assimilating states and organizations in using the Rawlsian device, but they puttoo much faith in Rawls's distinction between states and voluntary organizations and pay too little attention to the continuities betweenthem. Their plea for a conceptually autonomous ethics for organizations I interpret as reasonable and largely compatible with my ownstated opinion.
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  26. Laura Hartman, Denis Arnold & Richard Wokutch (2005). Rising Above Sweatshops: Innovative Approaches to Global Labor Challenges. Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):113-114.
     
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  27. Alejo José G. Sison, Edwin M. Hartman & Joan Fontrodona (2012). Guest Editor's Introduction: Reviving Tradition: Virtue and the Common Good in Business and Management. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):207-210.
    Virtue ethics, the authors believe, is distinct and superior to other options because it considers, in the first place, which preferences are worth pursuing, rather than just blindly maximizing preferences, and it takes into account intuitions, emotions and experience, instead of acting solely on abstract universal principles. Moreover, virtue ethics is seen as firmly rooted in human biology and psychology, particularly in our freedom, rationality, and sociability. Work, business, and management are presented as vital areas for the development of virtues, (...)
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  28.  78
    Tracy Hartman (forthcoming). Book Review: Preaching the Women of the Bible. [REVIEW] Interpretation 61 (4):463-463.
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  29.  12
    Patricia H. Werhane, Laura P. Hartman, Dennis Moberg, Elaine Englehardt, Michael Pritchard & Bidhan Parmar (2011). Social Constructivism, Mental Models, and Problems of Obedience. Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):103 - 118.
    There are important synergies for the next generation of ethical leaders based on the alignment of modified or adjusted mental models. This entails a synergistic application of moral imagination through collaborative input and critique, rather than "me too" obedience. In this article, we will analyze the Milgram results using frameworks relating to mental models (Werhane et al., Profitable partnerships for poverty alleviation, 2009), as well as work by Moberg on "ethics blind spots'' (Organizational Studies 27(3): 413-428, 2006), and by Bazerman (...)
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  30.  4
    Laura P. Hartman (2003). From Accountability to Action to Amplification. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):563-572.
    The following address considers the relevance of business ethics education to our students. Is our concept of ethics one of practiceand application? And, if so, are we accountable to our students, our institutions and ourselves, for the practical impact that we haveor, conversely, that we do not have? Aren’t we responsible in part if one of our students ventures forth and does not act in an ethicalmanner? Though a positive response to this query may not be popular, what is the (...)
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  31.  73
    Tracy L. Hartman (forthcoming). Book Review: Preaching to Every Pew. [REVIEW] Interpretation 57 (2):230-231.
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  32.  40
    Hope J. Hartman (1994). Educational Psychologists as Trainers for Intellectual Development. Inquiry 14 (2):29-42.
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  33.  33
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Voice. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:174-177.
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  34.  26
    R. Edward Freeman, Daniel R. Gilbert & Edwin Hartman (1988). Values and the Foundations of Strategic Management. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):821 - 834.
    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of values in strategic management. We discuss recent criticisms of the concept of strategy and argue that the concept of value helps reconcile these criticisms with traditional models of strategy. We show that Andrews' model of corporate strategy rightly takes morally significant values to be essential to effective management. We show how the notion of value can be clarified and used in research into various conceptions of corporate morality.
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  35.  66
    Tracy Hartman (forthcoming). Book Review: Entertaining Faith: Reading Short Stories in the Bible. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (2):210-210.
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  36.  30
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Persons. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:122-124.
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  37.  20
    Patricia Werhane, Laura Hartman, Crina Archer, David Bevan & Kim Clark (2011). Trust After the Global Financial Meltdown. Business and Society Review 116 (4):403-433.
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  38.  2
    Edwin M. Hartman (2001). Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy, and Organizational Ethics: A Response to Phillips and Margolis. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (4):673-685.
    Phillips and Margolis argue that moral philosophy is a poor basis for business ethics, but their narrow view of moral philosophywould exclude Aristotle, for one. They criticize me for assimilating states and organizations in using the Rawlsian device, but they puttoo much faith in Rawls's distinction between states and voluntary organizations and pay too little attention to the continuities betweenthem. Their plea for a conceptually autonomous ethics for organizations I interpret as reasonable and largely compatible with my ownstated opinion.
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  39.  18
    K. Kath Dhanda & Laura P. Hartman (2011). The Ethics of Carbon Neutrality: A Critical Examination of Voluntary Carbon Offset Providers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):119 - 149.
    In this article, we explore the world's response to the increasing impact of carbon emissions on the sobering threat posed by global warming: the carbon offset market. Though the market is a relatively new one, numerous offset providers have quickly emerged under both regulated and voluntary regimes. Owing to the lack of technical literacy of some stakeholders who participate in the market, no common quality or certification structure has yet emerged for providers. To the contrary, the media warns that a (...)
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  40. Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman (2005). Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices. Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (3):206-222.
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  41.  15
    Edwin M. Hartman (1994). The Commons and the Moral Organization. Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):253-269.
    A complex organization is in effect a commons, which supervisory techniques cannot preserve from free riding. A corporate culture strong enough to create the requisite community-minded second-order desires and beliefs may be morally illegitimate. What morality requires is not local enforcement of foundational moral principles-a futile undertaking-but that the organization be a good community in that it permits the disaffected to exit, encourages reflective consideration of morality and the good life, and creates appropriate loyalty.
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  42.  24
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Loyalty. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:171-174.
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  43. Robert S. Hartman (1961). Risieri Frondizi on the Nature of Value. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (2):223-232.
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  44.  26
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Notes. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:86-89.
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  45.  6
    Martin Paul Eve (2016). The Open-Source Everything Manifesto: Transparency, Truth, and Trust by Robert David Steele. Utopian Studies 27 (1):121-124.
    What is there not to like about “openness”? The premise seems to have virtue, particularly in the space of critique of government. From totalitarianism through to oligarchies, it can be argued that it is opacity and secrecy that have contributed to abuses of power for many centuries. In other spaces, the notion has caught hold. In several scientific fields, it appears that a lack of openness can lead to misconduct and in some cases a slowness that may cost lives. In (...)
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  46. Harold Bloom, Paul de Man, Jacques Derrida, Geoffrey Hartman & J. Hillis Miller (1980). Deconstruction and Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (2):219-221.
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  47.  21
    Edwin Hartman (1996). The Commons and Being Better Off. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:78-80.
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  48.  14
    Edwin M. Hartman (2001). Character and Leadership. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 20 (2):3-21.
  49.  25
    Laura Hartman (1999). Where to Eat in the Windy City! The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 10 (1):16-17.
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  50.  1
    Laura P. Hartman, Robert S. Rubin & K. Kathy Dhanda (2007). The Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: United States and European Union Multinational Corporations. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):373-389.
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