Search results for 'Eve Hartman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eve Hartman (2012). Do Scientists Care About Animal Welfare? Raintree.score: 120.0
     
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  2. Edwin Hartman (1996). Organizational Ethics and the Good Life. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Edwin Hartman argues that ethical principles should not derive from abstract theory, but from the real world of experience in organizations. He explains how ethical principles derive from what workers learn in their communities (firms), and that an ethical firm is one that creates the good life for the workers who contribute to its mission. His approach is based on the Aristotelian tradition of refined common sense, from recent work on collective action problems in organizations, and from social contract (...)
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  3. Laura P. Hartman & Moses L. Pava (2005). Sony Online Entertainment: Everquest® or Evercrack? Oxford Style Debate Presented at Tenth Annual International Conference Promoting Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):17 - 26.score: 60.0
    . Part C of this three part series is the presentation from the Oxford style debate held at the Tenth Annual International Conference Promoting Business Ethics between Laura Hartman, J.D., and Dr. Moses Pava on topics related to the EverQuest® v. EverCrack case (Part B). In a traditional Oxford style debate, two debaters take opposing viewpoints and the third debater argues the neutral position. At the Conference, the modified format featured the two debaters presenting diametrically opposing views – (...)
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  4. Laura M. Hartman (2012). The Christian Consumer: Living Faithfully in a Fragile World. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Be it fair trade coffee or foreign oil, our choices as consumers affect the well-being of humans around the globe, not to mention the natural world and of course ourselves. Consumption is a serious ethical issue, and Christian writers throughout history have weighed in, discussing topics such as affluence and poverty, greed and gluttony, and proper stewardship of resources. These voices are often at odds, however. In this book, Laura M. Hartman formulates a coherent Christian ethic of consumption, imposing (...)
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  5. David Hartman (1976). Maimonides: Torah and Philosophic Quest. Jewish Publication Society of America.score: 60.0
    In this original study, noted scholar and theologian David Hartman discusses the relation between Maimonides' halakhic writings and The Guide of the Perplexed- ...
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  6. Geoffrey H. Hartman (2002). Scars of the Spirit: The Struggle Against Inauthenticity. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    In this fascinating collection of essays, noted critic Geoffrey Hartman raises the essential question of where we can find the real or authentic in today's world, and how this affects the way we understand our human predicament. Hartman explores such issues as the fantasy of total information and perfect communication encouraged by the internet, the biographical excesses of tell-all talk shows that serve to shore up a personal sense of unreality, the tendency to motivate violence in the name (...)
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  7. Robert S. Hartman (1967). Formal Axiology and the Measurement of Values. Journal of Value Inquiry 1 (1):38-46.score: 30.0
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  8. Cathy L. Hartman & Caryn L. Beck-Dudley (1999). Marketing Strategies and the Search for Virtue: A Case Analysis of the Body Shop, International. Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):249 - 263.score: 30.0
    The authors propose a framework to integrate virtue ethics into marketing theory and apply it to the development of marketing strategies. Virtue ethics, a philosophy that focuses on an individual's moral character, has received limited attention from marketing scholars and researchers. The authors argue that without consideration of virtue ethics a comprehensive analysis of the ethical character of marketing decision makers and their strategies cannot be achieved. They provide an overview of virtue ethics supplemented by a case study of The (...)
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  9. Robert S. Hartman (1962). Axiology as a Science. Philosophy of Science 29 (4):412-433.score: 30.0
  10. Robert J. Hartman (2011). Involuntary Belief and the Command to Have Faith. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):181-192.score: 30.0
    Richard Swinburne argues that belief is a necessary but not sufficient condition for faith, and he also argues that, while faith is voluntary, belief is involuntary. This essay is concerned with the tension arising from the involuntary aspect of faith, the Christian doctrine that human beings have an obligation to exercise faith, and the moral claim that people are only responsible for actions where they have the ability to do otherwise. Put more concisely, the problem concerns the coherence of the (...)
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  11. Robert S. Hartman (1974). The Axiometric Structure of Intrinsic Value. Journal of Value Inquiry 8 (2):81-101.score: 30.0
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  12. Robert S. Hartman (1972). The Value Structure of Creativity. Journal of Value Inquiry 6 (4):243-279.score: 30.0
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  13. Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman (2005). Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices. Business Ethics 14 (3):206–222.score: 30.0
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  14. Edwin Hartman (1976). Aristotle on the Identity of Substance and Essence. Philosophical Review 85 (4):545-561.score: 30.0
    When aristotle identifies form with substance he may have sufficiently refuted heraclitus' contention that we cannot step into the same river twice, But he is left with two problems: (1) how an object can have matter but be identical to its essence and different from its matter; and (2) there are some questions about the conditions for identity of a substance across time. (staff).
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  15. Robert S. Hartman (1951). A Logical Definition of Value. Journal of Philosophy 48 (13):413-420.score: 30.0
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  16. Edwin M. Hartman (2009). Principles and Hypernorms. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):707 - 716.score: 30.0
    We typically test norms with reference to their usefulness in dealing with social problems and issues, though sometimes we use hypernorms to evaluate them. The hypernorms that we find most acceptable do not guide action in the way local norms do. They do, however, raise challenging questions that we should ask in evaluating any practice and its associated norms. In this respect, they differ from the principles associated with traditional, as opposed to modern, morality. As societies become more alike, in (...)
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  17. Edwin M. Hartman (2008). Socratic Questions and Aristotelian Answers: A Virtue-Based Approach to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):313 - 328.score: 30.0
    To teach that being ethical requires knowing foundational ethical principles – or, as Socrates claimed, airtight definitions of ethical terms – is to invite cynicism among students, for students discover that no such principles can be found. Aristotle differs from Socrates in claiming that ethics is about virtues primarily, and that one can be virtuous without having the sort of knowledge that characterizes mathematics or natural science. Aristotle is able to demonstrate that ethics and self-interest may overlap, that ethics is (...)
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  18. Lisa Jones Christensen, Ellen Peirce, Laura P. Hartman, W. Michael Hoffman & Jamie Carrier (2007). Ethics, CSR, and Sustainability Education in the Financial Times Top 50 Global Business Schools: Baseline Data and Future Research Directions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):347 - 368.score: 30.0
    This paper investigates how deans and directors at the top 50 global MBA programs (as rated by the "Financial Times" in their 2006 Global MBA rankings) respond to questions about the inclusion and coverage of the topics of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability at their respective institutions. This work purposely investigates each of the three topics separately. Our findings reveal that: (1) a majority of the schools require that one or more of these topics be covered in their MBA (...)
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  19. R. Edward Freeman, Daniel R. Gilbert & Edwin Hartman (1988). Values and the Foundations of Strategic Management. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):821 - 834.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of values in strategic management. We discuss recent criticisms of the concept of strategy and argue that the concept of value helps reconcile these criticisms with traditional models of strategy. We show that Andrews' model of corporate strategy rightly takes morally significant values to be essential to effective management. We show how the notion of value can be clarified and used in research into various conceptions of corporate morality.
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  20. Laura P. Hartman, Robert S. Rubin & K. Kathy Dhanda (2007). The Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: United States and European Union Multinational Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):373 - 389.score: 30.0
    This study explores corporate social responsibility (CSR) by conducting a cross-cultural analysis of communication of CSR activities in a total of 16 U.S. and European corporations. Drawing on previous research contrasting two major approaches to CSR initiatives, it was proposed that U.S. companies would tend to communicate about and justify CSR using economic or bottom-line terms and arguments whereas European companies would rely more heavily on language or theories of citizenship, corporate accountability, or moral commitment. Results supported this expectation of (...)
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  21. Laura P. Hartman & Patricia H. Werhane (2009). A Modular Approach to Business Ethics Integration: At the Intersection of the Stand-Alone and the Integrated Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):295 - 300.score: 30.0
    While no one seems to believe that business schools or their faculties bear entire responsibility for the ethical decision-making processes of their students, these same institutions do have some burden of accountability for educating students surrounding these skills. To that end, the standards promulgated by the Association to Advance Collegiate School of Business (AACSB), their global accrediting body, require that students learn ethics as part of a business degree. However, since the AACSB does not require the inclusion of a specific (...)
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  22. Edwin Hartman (1996). Emotion. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:135-137.score: 30.0
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  23. Sharn Rocco, Shaun Dempsey & David Hartman (2012). Teaching Calm Abiding Meditation to Mental Health Workers: A Descriptive Account of Valuing Subjectivity. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (2):193-211.score: 30.0
    Teaching an eight-week calm abiding meditation course to staff in a Child and Youth Mental Health Service located in a regional Australian city presented a curious meeting of Buddhism with Western culture. This meeting highlighted both the potential benefits and challenges of teaching meditation in the workplace and the value of qualitative methods for contributing to the development of meditation research. The thematic analysis of weekly participant responses to emailed reflective questions and follow-up interviews indicated that workplace meditation training can (...)
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  24. Sandra J. Hartman, Augusta C. Yrle & William P. Galle (1999). Procedural and Distributive Justice: Examining Equity in a University Setting. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 20 (4):337 - 351.score: 30.0
    The concept of organizational justice is important to understanding and predicting organizational behavior. A significant development in the research literature has been the separation of distributive and procedural justice. While much of the research has focused on negative outcomes, this research attempted to verify the presence of both forms of justice in the context of positive outcomes. Subjects completed an instrument designed to measure their perceptions of distributive and procedural justice. The subjects also reported their satisfaction and sense of fairness (...)
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  25. Robert S. Hartman (1948). The Moral Situation: A Field Theory of Ethics. Journal of Philosophy 45 (11):292-300.score: 30.0
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  26. Edwin Hartman (1996). Pleasure and Action. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:125-127.score: 30.0
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  27. Robert S. Hartman (1964). The Definition of Good: Moore's Axiomatic of the Science of Ethics. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 65:235 - 256.score: 30.0
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  28. Robert S. Hartman (1949). The Epistemology of the a Priori. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 9 (4):731-736.score: 30.0
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  29. Edwin M. Hartman (2000). An Aristotelian Approach to Moral Imagination. Professional Ethics 8 (3/4):57-77.score: 30.0
  30. William T. Hartman (2005). Ethics for School Business Officials. Scarecroweducation.score: 30.0
    Ethics and school business officials -- Making ethical decisions -- Ethics for school business officials -- Examining personal and professional codes of ethics -- Approaching ethical dilemmas -- Human resource management -- Financial resource management -- Facility, property, and information management -- Ancillary services : transportation.
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  31. Robert S. Hartman (1963). The Logical Difference Between Philosophy and Science. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (3):353-379.score: 30.0
    The purpose is to determine logically the difference between philosophy and science. It is concluded that the fundamental logical difference is: in the analytic concepts of philosophy intension and extension vary inversely whereas in the synthetic concepts of science they vary directly. The scientific concept is the ideal limit of the more and more intensive specification of philosophical concepts. (staff).
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  32. Robert S. Hartman (1961). Risieri Frondizi on the Nature of Value. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (2):223-232.score: 30.0
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  33. Robert S. Hartman (1960). The Logic of Description and Valuation. Review of Metaphysics 14 (2):191 - 230.score: 30.0
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  34. Edwin M. Hartman (1998). The Role of Character in Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):547-559.score: 30.0
    There is good reason to take a virtue-based approach to business ethics. Moral principles are fairly useful in assessing actions, but understanding how moral people behave and how they become moral requires reference to virtues, some of which are important inbusiness. We must go beyond virtues and refer to character, of which virtues are components, to grasp the relationship between moralassessment and psychological explanation. Virtues and other character traits are closely related to (in technical terms, they superveneon) personality traits postulated (...)
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  35. David Hartman (1979). Moral Uncertainties in the Practice of Medicine: The Dynamics of Interdependency From a Halakhic Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (1):98-112.score: 30.0
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  36. Robert S. Hartman (1942). Prime Number and Cosmical Number. Philosophy of Science 9 (2):190-196.score: 30.0
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  37. Brett Hartman, Faina Shalts & Caitlyn Ross (2009). Recent Case Developments in Health Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (2):380-388.score: 30.0
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  38. David Hartman (2011). The God Who Hates Lies: Confronting and Rethinking Jewish Tradition. Jewish Lights Pub..score: 30.0
    Introduction: what planet are you from? A yeshiva boy's pilgrimage into philosophy, history, and reality -- 1. Halakhic spirituality: living in the presence of God -- 2. Toward a God-intoxicated halakha -- 3. Feminism and apologetics: lying in the presence of God -- 4. Biology or covenant? Conversion and the corrupting influence of gentile seed -- 5. Where did modern orthodoxy go wrong? The mistaken halakhic presumptions of Rabbi Soloveitchik -- 6. The God who hates lies: choosing life in the (...)
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  39. Edwin M. Hartman (forthcoming). Donaldson on Rights and Corporate Obligations. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:163-172.score: 30.0
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  40. Robert S. Hartman (1953). Group Membership and Class Membership. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 13 (3):353-370.score: 30.0
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  41. Robert S. Hartman (1950). Is a Science of Ethics Possible. Philosophy of Science 17 (3):238-246.score: 30.0
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  42. Edwin M. Hartman (2008). Reconciliation in Business Ethics: Some Advice From Aristotle. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (2):253-265.score: 30.0
    It may be nearly impossible to use standard principles to make a decision about a complex ethical case. The best decision, say virtue ethicists in the Aristotelian tradition, is often one that is made by a person of good character who knows the salient facts of the case and can frame the situation appropriately. In this respect ethical decisions and strategic decisions are similar. Rationality plays a role in good ethical decision-making, but virtue ethicists emphasize the importance ofintuitions and emotions (...)
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  43. Edwin M. Hartman (2006). Review of Terry L. Price, Understanding Ethical Failures in Leadership. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (2).score: 30.0
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  44. Robert S. Hartman (1961). The Logic of Value. Review of Metaphysics 14 (3):389 - 432.score: 30.0
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  45. Robert S. Hartman (1958). Value, Fact and Science. Philosophy of Science 25 (2):97-108.score: 30.0
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  46. Richard Rorty & Ed Hartman (2005). Executive Summary of Richard Rorty's Address. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 16 (2):11-11.score: 30.0
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  47. Robert S. Hartman (1972). Kant's Science of Metaphysics and the Scientific Method. Kant-Studien 63 (1-4):18-35.score: 30.0
  48. Edwin M. Hartman (2001). Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy, and Organizational Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (4):673-685.score: 30.0
    Phillips and Margolis argue that moral philosophy is a poor basis for business ethics, but their narrow view of moral philosophywould exclude Aristotle, for one. They criticize me for assimilating states and organizations in using the Rawlsian device, but they puttoo much faith in Rawls's distinction between states and voluntary organizations and pay too little attention to the continuities betweenthem. Their plea for a conceptually autonomous ethics for organizations I interpret as reasonable and largely compatible with my ownstated opinion.
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  49. Edwin Hartman (1972). Predication and Immortality in Plato's Phaedo. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 54 (3):217-228.score: 30.0
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  50. Robert S. Hartman (1961). Prolegomena to a Meta-Anselmian Axiomatic. Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):637 - 675.score: 30.0
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