Search results for 'Events (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ernest Lepore & Brian P. McLaughlin (eds.) (1985). Actions and Events: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. B. Blackwell.
  2.  26
    Mezentsev Gennady (2008). The Character of Crisis Events in the Bases of Modern Philosophy And the Ways of Solving These Problems. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 17:49-55.
    This article is devoted to the crisis of the modern philosophy caused by the generally accepted approach towards the ontology issues of existence and the ways to solve these problems. Before Kant’s theory the fundamental principle of the universe organization in the ontology was the determination of the existence as the number of objects that were independent from the subject and explored as they were. Kant showed then that the subject deals only with the images of its own conscience. The (...)
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  3.  13
    Susanne K. Langer (1930). The Logic of Events. An Introduction to a Philosophy of Time. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 27 (13):361-363.
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  4. Donald Davidson (1980). Essays on Actions and Events. Oxford University Press.
  5. Andrew Paul Ushenko (1946). Power and Events: An Essay on Dynamics in Philosophy. By William O'Meara. [REVIEW] Ethics 57:305.
     
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  6. Thomas Mann (1947). Nietzsche's Philosophy in the Light of Contemporary Events. Washington[the Library of Congress].
     
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  7. Andrew Paul Ushenko (1947). Power and Events: An Essay on Dynamics in Philosophy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 5 (4):327-329.
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  8.  1
    Ernest LePore (1988). Of Donald Davidson, Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 1986, Pp. Xii, 520, $86.00. Truth and Interpretation is the Second of Two Companion Volumes to Emerge From the 1984 Rutgers Conference on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson.(The First Was Actions and Events (1985).) With Two Massive Collections Of. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (2).
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  9. Cerf Cerf (1948). Ushenko's Power and Events: An Essay on Dynamics in Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 9:775.
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  10. Ls Feuer (1988). A Narrative of Personal Events and Ideas in Philosophy, History and Social Action. Essays in Honor of Lewis Feuer. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 107:1-85.
     
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  11. A. Grunbaum (1989). Why Thematic Kinships Between Events Do Not Attest Their Causal Linkage in An Intimate Relation. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 116:477-494.
     
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  12. Andrew P. Uchenko (1930). The Logic of Events. An Introduction to a Philosophy of Time. Journal of Philosophy 27 (13):361-363.
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  13.  5
    Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). The Poverty of Philosophy: Desmond's Hyperbolic Gifts and Caputo's Events (Forthcoming). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (3).
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  14.  3
    Didier Debaise (2016). The Dramatic Power of Events: The Function of Method in Deleuze's Philosophy. Deleuze Studies 10 (1):5-18.
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  15.  11
    William F. Clarke (1928). The Idea of God in a Philosophy of Events. The Monist 38 (4):620-629.
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  16.  23
    Slavoj Žižek (2013). The Three Events of Philosophy. International Journal of Žižek Studies 7.
  17.  8
    Craig A. Lundy (forthcoming). Why Wasn't Capitalism Born in China? – Deleuze and the Philosophy of Non-Events. Theory and Event 16 (3).
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  18.  14
    Paul Patton (1991). The World Seen From Within: Deleuze and the Philosophy of Events. Theory and Event 1 (1).
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  19.  16
    Paul Trainor (1989). Actions and Events: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Edited by Ernest Lepore and Brian P. McLaughlin. Modern Schoolman 66 (3):229-230.
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  20. Robert L. Frazier, Oxford Links: Oxford University Faculty of Philosophy Philosophy Library Philosophy Events Cycling Club.
    To have a duty is, above all, to be subject to a binding, normative requirement. This means that unless there are exculpating reasons, someone who has a duty is required satisfy it, and can be justifiably criticized for not doing so. Having a duty to do something is like having been given a command to do it by someone who has a right to be obeyed: it must be done.
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  21.  5
    C. E. Ayres (1930). Philosophy and Genius:Characters and Events John Dewey, Joseph Ratner. Ethics 40 (2):263-.
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  22.  1
    E. W. Beth (1947). Review: Andrew Paul Ushenko, Power and Events. An Essay on Dynamics in Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):19-20.
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  23.  1
    William O'Meara (1947). Book Review:Power and Events: An Essay on Dynamics in Philosophy. Andrew Paul Ushenko. [REVIEW] Ethics 57 (4):305-.
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  24.  10
    Chakor Ajgaonkar (2004). Tales From Sai Baba's Life: Three Dimensional Projection of Baba's Divinity, Words, Actions, Life-Events in Correct Prospective of Chronology, Spiritual Depth, Potency & Philosophy. Diamond Pocket Books.
    Sri Sai Baba, 1836-1918, spiritual leader from India.
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  25. C. Bouton (2000). The History Whose Events Are Thoughts-Hegel and the History of Philosophy. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 98 (2):294-317.
  26. J. Collins (1946). Ushenko, Andrew Paul. "Power and Events: An Essay on Dynamics in Philosophy". [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 24:176.
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  27. Leandro Sequeiros (2011). Science, Philosophy and Religion Between 2011 and 2012. Some Significant Events. Pensamiento 67 (254):1127-1132.
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  28.  16
    Brian Massumi (2011). Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts. MIT Press.
    Introduction. Activist philosophy and the occurrent arts -- The ether and your anger toward a speculative pragmatism -- The thinking-feeling of what happens putting the radical back in empiricism -- The diagram as technique of existence ovum of the universe segmented -- Arts of experience, politics of expression In four movements. First movement. To dance a storm -- Second movement. Life unlimited -- Third movement. The paradox of content -- Fourth movement. Composing the political.
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  29. Ed Pluth (2010). Badiou: A Philosophy of the New. Polity.
    Introduction -- Badiou's philosophical background -- Being and event -- Situations and events -- Logics of worlds -- Infinity and truth -- Badiou's theories of the subject -- Ethics and affects -- Politics -- Conclusion.
     
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  30. Lawrence Brian Lombard (1986). Events: A Metaphysical Study. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    I EXISTENTIAL PROOFS INTRODUCTION Metaphysical problems, like all philosophical problems, arise from a sense of puzzlement. What is puzzling is that the ...
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  31.  23
    Judith Jarvis Thomson (1977). Acts and Other Events. Cornell University Press.
  32.  21
    Andrew E. Benjamin (1993). The Plural Event: Descartes, Hegel, Heidegger. Routledge.
    Nothing is more simple or more complicated than the event. In recent years, the attack on any attempts to provide a foundation for philosophy has focused on the "logic of the event." In The Plural Event , Andrew Benjamin reconsiders and reworks philosophy in terms of events and how they are judged. Benjamin offers a sustained philosophical reworking of ontology, providing important readings of key canonical texts in the history of philosophy. In order to avoid the charge of positivism, (...)
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  33.  7
    Alain Badiou (2005/2007). Being and Event. Continuum.
    A translation of one of the single most important works of recent French philosophy, Badiou's magnum opus, and a must-have for his growing following and anyone interested in contemporary Continental thought.
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  34. Simon Blackburn (2008). The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. Oxford ;Oxford University Press.
    Comprehensive and authoritative the Dictionary of Philosophy contains over 2,500 entries, including biographies of nearly 500 influential philosophers. The dictionary provides wide-ranging and lively coverage of not only Western philosophical traditions, but also themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic, and Jewish philosophy. This clear and easy to use reference also contains in-depth analysis of philosophical terms and concepts, and a chronology of philosophical events stretching from 10,000 BC to the present day.
     
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  35.  36
    Aviezer Tucker (2004). Our Knowledge of the Past: A Philosophy of Historiography. Cambridge University Press.
    How do historians, comparative linguists, biblical and textual critics and evolutionary biologists establish beliefs about the past? How do they know the past? This book presents a philosophical analysis of the disciplines that offer scientific knowledge of the past. Using the analytic tools of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of science the book covers such topics as evidence, theory, methodology, explanation, determination and underdetermination, coincidence, contingency and counterfactuals in historiography. Aviezer Tucker's central claim is that historiography as a scientific discipline should (...)
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  36. Mohan Matthen (2015). Introduction to Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. In Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press 1-25.
    Perception is the ultimate source of our knowledge about contingent facts. It is an extremely important philosophical development that starting in the last quarter of the twentieth century, philosophers have begun to change how they think of perception. The traditional view of perception focussed on sensory receptors; it has become clear, however, that perceptual systems radically transform the output of these receptors, yielding content concerning objects and events in the external world. Adequate understanding of this process requires that we (...)
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  37.  30
    Maureen A. O’Malley (2010). Ernst Mayr, the Tree of Life, and Philosophy of Biology. Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):529-552.
    Ernst Mayr’s influence on philosophy of biology has given the field a particular perspective on evolution, phylogeny and life in general. Using debates about the tree of life as a guide, I show how Mayrian evolutionary biology excludes numerous forms of life and many important evolutionary processes. Hybridization and lateral gene transfer are two of these processes, and they occur frequently, with important outcomes in all domains of life. Eukaryotes appear to have a more tree-like history because successful lateral (...) tend to occur among more closely related species, or at a lower frequency, than in prokaryotes, but this is a difference of degree rather than kind. Although the tree of life is especially problematic as a representation of the evolutionary history of prokaryotes, it can function more generally as an illustration of the limitations of a standard evolutionary perspective. Moreover, for philosophers, questions about the tree of life can be applied to the Mayrian inheritance in philosophy of biology. These questions make clear that the dichotomy of life Mayr suggested is based on too narrow a perspective. An alternative to this dichotomy is a multidimensional continuum in which different strategies of genetic exchange bestow greater adaptiveness and evolvability on prokaryotes and eukaryotes. (shrink)
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  38.  34
    Andreea Mihali (2012). Desmond M. Clarke and Catherine Wilson, Eds., The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (5):365-369.
    This Oxford Handbook examines the radical transformation of worldview taking place in the period from the middle of the 16th century to the early 18th century. The intention of the volume is to cover both well-known and undeservedly less well-known philosophical texts by placing these works in their historical context which includes tight interconnections with other disciplines as well as historical and political events. By proceeding in this manner the editors hope to recover a meaning of “philosophy” that comes (...)
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  39.  28
    Géza Kállay (2011). At T-Time, the Inchoative Nick of Time, and “Statements About the Past”: Time and History in the Analytic Philosophy of Language. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):322-351.
    The paper, drawing on articles by J. M. E. McTaggart, G. E. Moore, D. Davidson, J. L. Austin, B. Russell, A. J. Ayer and G. E. M. Anscombe, argues that the philosophy of language in the analytic tradition has developed an “inchoative“ view of time, and history is a problem as regards the existence of events in the past and how these events can be known. An alternative view is hinted at through the work of L. Wittgenstein and (...)
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  40.  10
    Yong-Sock Chang & Ji–Young Kim (2008). Visual Culture Education Through the Philosophy for Children Program. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:27-34.
    The appearance of mass media and a versatile medium of videos can serve the convenience and instructive information for children; on the other hand, it could abet them in implicit image consumption. Now is the time for kids' to be in need of thinking power which enables them to make a choice, applications andcriticism of information within such visual cultures. In spite of these social changes, the realities are that our curriculum still doesn't meet a learner's demand properly. This research, (...)
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  41.  11
    Alexander Kremer (2013). Gadamer and Rorty on the History of Philosophy. Philosophy Today 57 (2):129-141.
    History of philosophy is embedded into the theory of history. Two different philosophies, but we still have similar basic connections between different parts of each philosophy and a closer similarity of these two relativist thinkers. Gadamer, as a disciple of Heidegger, worked out the philosophical hermeneutics (Truth and Method, 1960) established by Heidegger in the early 20s. He embedded his approach of the history of philosophy in his hermeneutics, particularly in his description of history grasped as a chain of historically (...)
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  42.  17
    Genyou Wu (2010). A Preliminary Discussion of Dai Zhen's Philosophy of Language. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):523-542.
    Dai Zhen’s philosophy of language took the opportunity of a transition in Chinese philosophy to develop a form of humanist positivism, which was different from both the Song and Ming dynasties’ School of Principles and the early Qing dynasty’s philosophical forms. His philosophy of language had four primary manifestations: (1) It differentiated between names pointing at entities and real events and names describing summum bonum and perfection ; (2) In discussing the metaphysical issue of the Dao, it (...)
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  43.  38
    Peter T. Manicas (2006). A Realist Philosophy of Social Science: Explanation and Understanding. Cambridge University Press.
    This introduction to the philosophy of social science provides an original conception of the task and nature of social inquiry. Peter Manicas discusses the role of causality seen in the physical sciences and offers a reassessment of the problem of explanation from a realist perspective. He argues that the fundamental goal of theory in both the natural and social sciences is not, contrary to widespread opinion, prediction and control, or the explanation of events (including behaviour). Instead, theory aims to (...)
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  44. Simon Blackburn (2016). The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This bestselling dictionary is written by one of the leading philosophers of our time, and it is widely recognized as the best dictionary of its kind. Comprehensive and authoritative, it covers every aspect of philosophy from Aristotle to Zen. With clear and concise definitions, it provides lively and accessible coverage of not only Western philosophical traditions, but also themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic, and Jewish philosophy. Entries include over 400 biographies of famous and influential philosophers, in-depth analysis of philosophical terms (...)
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  45.  49
    Jean Hampton (1997). Political Philosophy. Westview Press.
    Political philosophy, perhaps even more than other branches of philosophy, calls for constant renewal to reflect not just re-readings of the tradition but also the demands of current events. In this lively and readable survey, Jean Hampton has created a text for our time that does justice both to the great traditions of the field and to the newest developments. In a marvelous feat of synthesis, she links the classical tradition, the giants of the modern period, the dominant topics (...)
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  46. Stewart Candlish (2007). The Russell/Bradley Dispute and its Significance for Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In the early twentieth century an apparently obscure philosophical debate took place between F. H. Bradley and Bertrand Russell. The historical outcome was momentous: the demise of the movement known as British Idealism, and its eventual replacement by the various forms of analytic philosophy. Since then, a conception of this debate and its rights and wrongs has become entrenched in English-language philosophy. Stewart Candlish examines afresh the events of this formative period in twentieth-century thought and (...)
     
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  47.  26
    John McCumber (1996). Time in the Ditch: American Philosophy and the McCarthy Era. Diacritics 26 (1):33-49.
    In _Time in the Ditch, _John McCumber explores the effect of McCarthyism on American philosophy in the 1940s and 1950s. The possibility that the political pressures of the McCarthy era might have skewed the development of the discipline has rarely been addressed in the subsequent half century. Why was silence maintained for so long? And what happens, McCumber asks, when political events and pressures go beyond interfering with individual careers to influence the nature of a discipline itself?
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  48.  89
    Niki Pfeifer (2012). Experiments on Aristotle's Thesis: Towards an Experimental Philosophy of Conditionals. The Monist 95 (2):223-240.
    Two experiments (N1 = 141, N2 = 40) investigate two versions of Aristotle’s Thesis for the first time. Aristotle’s Thesis is a negated conditional, which consists of one propositional variable with a negation either in the antecedent (version 1) or in the consequent (version 2). This task allows to infer if people interpret indicative conditionals as material conditionals or as conditional events. In the first experiment I investigate between-participants the two versions of Aristotle’s Thesis crossed with abstract versus concrete (...)
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  49.  20
    Alexandre Monnin & Harry Halpin (2012). Toward a Philosophy of The Web. Metaphilosophy 43 (4):361-379.
    The advent of the Web is one of the defining technological events of the twentieth century, yet its impact on the fundamental questions of philosophy has not yet been explored, much less systematized. The Web, as today implemented on the foundations of the Internet, is broadly construed as the space of all items of interest identified by URIs. Originally a space of linked hypertext documents, today the Web is rapidly evolving as a universal platform for data and computation. Even (...)
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  50. Gregory M. Nixon (2010). Whitehead & the Elusive Present: Process Philosophy's Creative Core. Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (5):625-639.
    Time’s arrow is necessary for progress from a past that has already happened to a future that is only potential until creatively determined in the present. But time’s arrow is unnecessary in Einstein’s so-called block universe, so there is no creative unfolding in an actual present. How can there be an actual present when there is no universal moment of simultaneity? Events in various places will have different presents according to the position, velocity, and nature of the perceiver. Standing (...)
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