Search results for 'Evolution (Biology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Adolf Meyer (1964). The Historico-Philosophical Background of the Modern Evolution-Biology. Leiden, E. J. Brill.
     
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  2. D. R. Brooks (1988). Evolution as Entropy: Toward a Unified Theory of Biology. University of Chicago Press.
    "By combining recent advances in the physical sciences with some of the novel ideas, techniques, and data of modern biology, this book attempts to achieve a new and different kind of evolutionary synthesis. I found it to be challenging, fascinating, infuriating, and provocative, but certainly not dull."--James H, Brown, University of New Mexico "This book is unquestionably mandatory reading not only for every living biologist but for generations of biologists to come."--Jack P. Hailman, Animal Behaviour , review of the first (...)
     
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  3.  7
    Eugene Earnshaw (2011). Evolution Beyond Biology: Examining the Evolutionary Economics of Nelson and Winter. Biological Theory 6 (4):301-310.
    Nelson and Winter’s An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change (1982) was the foundational work of what has become the thriving sub-discipline of evolutionary economics. In attempting to develop an alternative to neoclassical economics, the authors looked to borrow basic ideas from biology, in particular a concept of economic “natural selection.” However, the evolutionary models they construct in their seminal work are in many respects quite different from the models of evolutionary biology. There is no reproduction in any usual sense, “mutation” (...)
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  4.  20
    Timothy Shanahan (2004). The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation, and Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected from the beginning and (...)
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  5. James Wynn (2011). Evolution by the Numbers: The Origins of Mathematical Argument in Biology. Parlor Press.
     
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  6.  6
    Bart Boer (2016). Modeling Co‐Evolution of Speech and Biology. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):459-468.
    Two computer simulations are investigated that model interaction of cultural evolution of language and biological evolution of adaptations to language. Both are agent-based models in which a population of agents imitates each other using realistic vowels. The agents evolve under selective pressure for good imitation. In one model, the evolution of the vocal tract is modeled; in the other, a cognitive mechanism for perceiving speech accurately is modeled. In both cases, biological adaptations to using and learning speech (...)
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  7.  10
    Lynn J. Rothschild (2010). A Powerful Toolkit for Synthetic Biology: Over 3.8 Billion Years of Evolution. Bioessays 32 (4):304-313.
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  8.  3
    John Collier (1985). Evolution at a Crossroads the New Biology and the New Philosophy of Science. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9. Stavros Ioannidis (2008). How Development Changes Evolution: Conceptual and Historical Issues in Evolutionary Developmental Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):567-578.
    Evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo) is a new and rapidly developing field of biology which focuses on questions in the intersection of evolution and development and has been seen by many as a potential synthesis of these two fields. This synthesis is the topic of the books reviewed here. Integrating Evolution and Development (edited by Roger Sansom and Robert Brandon), is a collection of papers on conceptual issues in Evo-Devo, while From Embryology to Evo-Devo (edited by Manfred Laubichler and (...)
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  10. Stavros Ioannidis (2013). Regulatory Evolution and Theoretical Arguments in Evolutionary Biology. Science and Education 22 (2):279-292.
    The cis-regulatory hypothesis is one of the most important claims of evolutionary developmental biology. In this paper I examine the theoretical argument for cis-regulatory evolution and its role within evolutionary theorizing. I show that, although the argument has some weaknesses, it acts as a useful example for the importance of current scientific debates for science education.
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  11.  31
    Wim J. van der Steen (2000). Methodological Problems in Evolutionary Biology. XIII. Evolution and Knowledge. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (1):73-84.
    Evolutionary epistemologists aim to explain the evolution of cognitive capacities underlying human knowledge and also the processes that generate knowledge, for example in science. There can be no doubt that our cognitive capacities are due in part to our evolutionary heritage. But this is an uninformative thesis. All features of organism have indeed been shaped by evolution. A substantive evolutionary explanation of cognition would have to provide details about the evolutionary processes involved. Evolutionary epistemology has not provided any (...)
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  12. Harry Smit (2014). The Social Evolution of Human Nature: From Biology to Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This book sheds new light on the problem of how the human mind evolved. Harry Smit argues that current studies of this problem misguidedly try to solve it by using variants of the Cartesian conception of the mind, and shows that combining the Aristotelian conception with Darwin's theory provides us with far more interesting answers. He discusses the core problem of how we can understand language evolution in terms of inclusive fitness theory, and investigates how scientific and conceptual insights (...)
     
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  13.  14
    Jay Odenbaugh, Nothing in Ethics Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution? Natural Goodness and Evolutionary Biology.
    Philippa Foot and Rosalind Hursthouse, along with other philosophers, have argued for a metaethical position, the natural goodness approach, that claims moral evaluations are, or are on a par with, teleological claims made in the biological sciences. Specifically, an organism’s flourishing is characterized by how well they function as specified by the species to which they belong. In this essay, I first sketch the Neo-Aristotelian natural goodness approach. Second, I argue that critics who claim that this sort of approach is (...)
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  14.  6
    Bradley Franks (2014). The Roles of Evolution in the Social Sciences: Is Biology Ballistic? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (3):288-305.
    This paper discusses some widespread but often not fully articulated views concerning the possible roles of biology and evolution in the social sciences. Such views cluster around a set of intuitions that suggest that evolution's role is “ballistic”: it constitutes a starting point for mind that has been, and is, superseded by the role of culture and social construction. An implication is that evolved and the socially constructed aspects of mind are separable and independent, with the latter being (...)
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  15. Jan Sapp (2003). Genesis: The Evolution of Biology. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Genesis: The Evolution of Biology presents a history of the past two centuries of biology, suitable for use in courses, but of interest more broadly to evolutionary biologists, geneticists, and biomedical scientists, as well as general readers interested in the history of science. The book covers the early evolutionary biologists-Lamarck, Cuvier, Darwin and Wallace through Mayr and the neodarwinian synthesis, in much the same way as other histories of evolution have done, bringing in also the social implications, the (...)
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  16.  25
    William S. Cooper (2001). The Evolution of Reason: Logic as a Branch of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The formal systems of logic have ordinarily been regarded as independent of biology, but recent developments in evolutionary theory suggest that biology and logic may be intimately interrelated. In this book, Cooper outlines a theory of rationality in which logical law emerges as an intrinsic aspect of evolutionary biology. This biological perspective on logic, though at present unorthodox, could change traditional ideas about the reasoning process. Cooper examines the connections between logic and evolutionary biology and illustrates how logical rules are (...)
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  17.  11
    Sahotra Sarkar & Jason Scott Robert (2001). Biology and Philosophy Special Issue for 2003 – Evolution and Development. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):573-573.
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  18.  29
    Michael Ruse (2006). The Evolution of the Philosophy of Biology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (3):437-442.
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  19. Rudi Jansma (2010). Global Philosophical and Ecological Concepts: Cycles, Causality, Ecology and Evolution in Various Traditions and Their Impact on Modern Biology. Prakrit Bharti Academy.
    v. I. Cycles, causality, ecology -- v. II. Evolution & appendices.
     
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  20. Massimo Pigliucci (2010). Okasha's Evolution and the Levels of Selection: Toward a Broader Conception of Theoretical Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):405-415.
    The debate about the levels of selection has been one of the most controversial both in evolutionary biology and in philosophy of science. Okasha’s book makes the sort of contribution that simply will not be able to be ignored by anyone interested in this field for many years to come. However, my interest here is in highlighting some examples of how Okasha goes about discussing his material to suggest that his book is part of an increasingly interesting trend that sees (...)
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  21. Stanley N. Salthe (1993). Development and Evolution Complexity and Change in Biology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  22.  8
    Bernard Walliser (2011). Learning Versus Evolution: From Biology to Game Theory. Biological Theory 6 (4):311-319.
  23.  46
    John Haught (2009). Theology and Evolution: How Much Can Biology Explain? In Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press 246.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001788502; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 246-264.; Language(s): English; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  24.  40
    Pieter Lemmens (2003). Book Review: Susan Oyama (2000). Evolution's Eye: A Systems View of the Biology-Culture Divide. [REVIEW] Acta Biotheoretica 51 (1):59-64.
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  25.  10
    I. Bubanovic & S. Najman (2004). Ideas in Theoretical Biology - Failure of Anti-Tumor Immunity in Mammals - Evolution of the Hypothesis. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (1):57-64.
    Observations on the morphological and functional similarity between embryonic or trophoblast tissues and tumors are very old. Over a period of time many investigators have created different hypotheses on the origin of cancerogenesis or tumor efficiency in relation to the host immune system. Some of these ideas have been rejected but many of them are still current. A presumption of the inefficiency of anti-tumor immunity in mammals due to the high similarity between trophoblast and embryonic cells to tumor cells is (...)
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  26.  11
    Jacques Demongeot, Nicolas Glade & Andrés Moreira (2008). Evolution and RNA Relics. A Systems Biology View. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (1-2):5-25.
    The genetic code has evolved from its initial non-degenerate wobble version until reaching its present state of degeneracy. By using the stereochemical hypothesis, we revisit the problem of codon assignations to the synonymy classes of amino-acids. We obtain these classes with a simple classifier based on physico-chemical properties of nucleic bases, like hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Then we propose simple RNA ring structures that present, overlap included, one and only one codon by synonymy class as solutions of a combinatory variational (...)
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  27.  14
    Arthur Peacocke (1999). Biology and a Theology of Evolution. Zygon 34 (4):695-712.
  28.  31
    Brett Calcott (2009). Manfred D. Laubichler and Gerd B. Müller (Eds): Modeling Biology: Structures, Behaviors, Evolution (Vienna Series in Theoretical Biology). Acta Biotheoretica 57 (3):383-387.
  29.  5
    Robert J. O'Hara (1994). Review of Panchen's 'Classification, Evolution, and the Nature of Biology'. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 85 (1): 182–183.
  30. Brett Calcott (2009). Modeling Biology: Structures, Behaviors, Evolution. [REVIEW] Acta Biotheoretica 57 (3):383-387.
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  31. Catherine Roberts (1980). Science, Animals, and Evolution: Reflections on Some Unrealized Potentials of Biology and Medicine. Greenwood Press.
     
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  32. Eustace Lovatt Hebden Taylor (1967). Evolution and the Reformation of Biology. Nutley, N.J.,Craig Press.
     
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  33. Hilary Callahan, Massimo Pigliucci & Carl Schlichting (1997). Developmental Phenotypic Plasticity: Where Ecology and Evolution Meet Molecular Biology. Bioessays 19 (6):519-525.
    An exploration of the nexus between ecology, evolutionary biology and molecular biology, via the concept of phenotypic plasticity.
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  34.  16
    Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini (1989). Evolution, Selection, and Cognition: From Learning to Parameter Setting in Biology and in the Study of Language. Cognition 31 (1):1-44.
  35.  22
    Michael R. Dietrich (1998). Paradox and Persuasion: Negotiating the Place of Molecular Evolution Within Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 31 (1):85 - 111.
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  36. Theodosius Dobzhansky (1983). Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution. In J. Peter Zetterberg (ed.), Evolution Versus Creationism: The Public Education Controversy. Oryx Press 18--28.
     
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  37. John F. Haught (2009). Theology, Evolution, and the Human Mind: How Much Can Biology Explain? Zygon 44 (4):921-931.
    Evolutionary biology contributes much to our present understanding of life, and it promises also to deepen our understanding of human intelligence, ethics, and even religion. For some scientific thinkers, however, Darwin's science seems so impressive that it now supplants theology altogether by providing the ultimate explanation of all manifestations of life, not only biologically but also metaphysically. By focusing on human intelligence as an emergent aspect of nature this essay examines the question of whether theology can still have an explanatory (...)
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  38.  25
    D. W. Zaidel & M. Nadal (2011). Brain Intersections of Aesthetics and Morals Perspectives From Biology, Neuroscience, and Evolution. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):367-380.
    Human aesthetic experiences are pervasive; they are triggered by faces, art, natural scenery, foods, ideas, theories, and decision-making situations, among many sources, and seem to be a distinctive trait of our species. Our moral sense, understood as our capacity to judge events, actions, or people as good or bad, appropriate or inappropriate, also seems to be an exclusively human endowment (Ayala 2010). As part of the scientific efforts to characterize the biological foundations of our human uniqueness, recently there has been (...)
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  39.  8
    William C. Wimsatt (1999). Generativity, Entrenchment, Evolution, and Innateness: Philosophy, Evolutionary Biology, and Conceptual Foundations of Science. In V. Harcastle (ed.), Where Biology Meets Psychology. 137--179.
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  40.  22
    Sahotra Sarkar & JasonScott Robert (2001). Biology and Philosophy Special Issue for 2003 – Evolution and Development. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):573-573.
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  41.  15
    Matthew Day (2010). A Spectre Haunts Evolution: Haeckel, Heidegger, and the All-Too-Human History of Biology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (2):289-303.
  42.  5
    Stephen S. Morse (1992). Evolving Views of Viral Evolution: Towards an Evolutionary Biology of Viruses. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 14 (2):215 - 248.
    Despite considerable interest in viral evolution, at least among virologists, viruses are rarely considered from the same evolutionary vantage point as other organisms. Early work of necessity emphasized phenotype and phenotypic variation (and therefore arguably was more oriented towards the broader biological and ecological perspectives). More recent work (essentially since the development of molecular evolution in the 1960's but beginning earlier) has concentrated on genotypic variation, with less clarity about the significance of such variations. Other aspects of evolutionary (...)
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  43. Francisco J. Ayala (2007). Human Evolution: The Three Grand Challenges of Human Biology. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press
     
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  44. Clive K. Catchpole (1986). The Biology and Evolution of Bird Songs. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 30 (1):47.
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  45. Olga F. Lazareva, Toru Shimizu & Edward A. Wasserman (eds.) (2012). How Animals See the World: Comparitive Behaviour, Biology, and Evolution of Vision. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The visual world of animals is highly diverse and often very different from the world that we humans take for granted. This book provides an extensive review of the latest behavioral and neurobiological research on animal vision, highlighting fascinating species similarities and differences in visual processing. It contains 26 chapters written by world-leading experts about a variety of species including: honeybees, spiders, fish, birds, and primates. The chapters are divided into six sections: Perceptual grouping and segmentation, Object perception and object (...)
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  46. Jerold M. Lowenstein & Adrienne L. Zihlman (1984). Human Evolution and Molecular Biology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 27 (4):611-622.
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  47. Timothy Shanahan (2006). The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation and Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism, first published in 2004, focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected (...)
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  48. Timothy Shanahan (2009). The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation and Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism, first published in 2004, focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected (...)
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  49. Timothy Shanahan (2004). The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation and Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism, first published in 2004, focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected (...)
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  50.  13
    W. Tecumseh Fitch (2006). The Biology and Evolution of Music: A Comparative Perspective. Cognition 100 (1):173-215.
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