Search results for 'Evolution (Biology History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Edward J. Larson (2004). Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory. Modern Library.
    “I often said before starting, that I had no doubt I should frequently repent of the whole undertaking.” So wrote Charles Darwin aboard The Beagle , bound for the Galapagos Islands and what would arguably become the greatest and most controversial discovery in scientific history. But the theory of evolution did not spring full-blown from the head of Darwin. Since the dawn of humanity, priests, philosophers, and scientists have debated the origin and development of life on earth, and (...)
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  2.  5
    Russ Hodge (2009). Evolution: The History of Life on Earth. Facts on File.
    Describes evolution, including the history of the theory, biological classification, societal and legal ramifications, and the connection between evolution and ...
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  3.  15
    Matthew Day (2010). A Spectre Haunts Evolution: Haeckel, Heidegger, and the All-Too-Human History of Biology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (2):289-303.
  4.  1
    G. Guille-Escuret (1997). Biology Reinvigorated: Life/Society, Nature/Culture, Evolution/History. Diogenes 45 (180):1-19.
    In fact, analogy is a legitimate form of comparison, and comparison is the only practical means we have for the understanding of things. The fault of the biological sociologists was not that they used it but that they used it wrongly. Instead of trying to control their studies of society by their knowledge of biol ogy, they tried to infer the laws of the first from the laws of the second.
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  5.  2
    Rebecca Stott (2012). Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution. Spiegel & Grau.
    Citing an 1859 letter that accused Charles Darwin of failing to acknowledge his scientific predecessors, a chronicle of the collective history of evolution dedicates each chapter to an evolutionary thinker, from Aristotle and da Vinci to ...
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  6. Stephen T. Asma (2002). Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: The Culture and Evolution of Natural History Museums. Journal of the History of Biology 35 (1):185-187.
     
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  7.  20
    Timothy Shanahan (2004). The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation, and Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected from the beginning and (...)
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  8. Theodore W. Pietsch (2012). Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Brackets and tables, circles and maps, 1554-1872 -- Early botanical networks and trees, 1766-1815 -- The first evolutionary tree, 1786-1820 -- Diverse and unusual trees of the early nineteenth century, 1817-1834 -- The rule of five, 1819-1854 -- Pre-Darwinian branching diagrams, 1828-1858 -- Evolution and the trees of Charles Darwin, 1837-1868 -- The trees of Ernst Haeckel, 1866-1905 -- Post-Darwinian nonconformists, 1868-1896 -- More late-nineteenth-century trees, 1874-1897 -- Trees of the early twentieth century, 1901-1930 -- The trees of Alfred (...)
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  9. Michael Ruse (2009). Defining Darwin: Essays on the History and Philosophy of Evolutionary Biology. Prometheus Books.
     
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  10.  3
    Eva Jablonka, Marion J. Lamb & Anna Zeligowski (2006). Evolution in Four Dimensions: Genetic, Epigenetic, Behavioral, and Symbolic Variation in the History of Life. A Bradford Book.
    Ideas about heredity and evolution are undergoing a revolutionary change. New findings in molecular biology challenge the gene-centered version of Darwinian theory according to which adaptation occurs only through natural selection of chance DNA variations. In Evolution in Four Dimensions, Eva Jablonka and Marion Lamb argue that there is more to heredity than genes. They trace four "dimensions" in evolution -- four inheritance systems that play a role in evolution: genetic, epigenetic, behavioral, and symbolic. These systems, (...)
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  11.  11
    Marianne Sommer (2008). History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473 - 528.
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the (...)
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  12.  17
    Joel B. Hagen (1999). Naturalists, Molecular Biologists, and the Challenges of Molecular Evolution. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):321 - 341.
    Biologists and historians often present natural history and molecular biology as distinct, perhaps conflicting, fields in biological research. Such accounts, although supported by abundant evidence, overlook important areas of overlap between these areas. Focusing upon examples drawn particularly from systematics and molecular evolution, I argue that naturalists and molecular biologists often share questions, methods, and forms of explanation. Acknowledging these interdisciplinary efforts provides a more balanced account of the development of biology during the post-World War II era.
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  13.  8
    Kostas Kampourakis & Ross H. Nehm (2014). History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Evolution: Students’ Conceptions and Explanations. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 377-399.
    A large body of work in science education indicates that evolution is one of the least understood and accepted scientific theories. Although scholarship from the history and philosophy of science (HPS) has shed light on many conceptual and pedagogical issues in evolution education, HPS-informed studies of evolution education are also characterized by conceptual weaknesses. In this chapter, we critically review such studies and find that some work lacks historically accurate characterizations of student ideas (preconceptions and misconceptions). (...)
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  14.  10
    Richard Dawkins (2004). The Ancestor's Tale: A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Evolution. Houghton Mifflin.
    The renowned biologist and thinker Richard Dawkins presents his most expansive work yet: a comprehensive look at evolution, ranging from the latest developments in the field to his own provocative views. Loosely based on the form of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Dawkins's Tale takes us modern humans back through four billion years of life on our planet. As the pilgrimage progresses, we join with other organisms at the forty "rendezvous points" where we find a common ancestor. The band of pilgrims (...)
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  15.  11
    Charles H. Pence (2015). The Early History of Chance in Evolution. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 50:48-58.
    Work throughout the history and philosophy of biology frequently employs ‘chance’, ‘unpredictability’, ‘probability’, and many similar terms. One common way of understanding how these concepts were introduced in evolution focuses on two central issues: the first use of statistical methods in evolution (Galton), and the first use of the concept of “objective chance” in evolution (Wright). I argue that while this approach has merit, it fails to fully capture interesting philosophical reflections on the role of chance (...)
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  16. Stavros Ioannidis (2008). How Development Changes Evolution: Conceptual and Historical Issues in Evolutionary Developmental Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):567-578.
    Evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo) is a new and rapidly developing field of biology which focuses on questions in the intersection of evolution and development and has been seen by many as a potential synthesis of these two fields. This synthesis is the topic of the books reviewed here. Integrating Evolution and Development (edited by Roger Sansom and Robert Brandon), is a collection of papers on conceptual issues in Evo-Devo, while From Embryology to Evo-Devo (edited by Manfred Laubichler and (...)
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  17.  39
    Ron Amundson (1998). Typology Reconsidered: Two Doctrines on the History of Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):153-177.
    Recent historiography of 19th century biology supports the revision of two traditional doctrines about the history of biology. First, the most important and widespread biological debate around the time of Darwin was not evolution versus creation, but biological functionalism versus structuralism. Second, the idealist and typological structuralist theories of the time were not particularly anti-evolutionary. Typological theories provided argumentation and evidence that was crucial to the refutation of Natural Theological creationism. The contrast between functionalist and structuralist approaches to (...)
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  18.  11
    Michael Ruse (2000/2001). The Evolution Wars: A Guide to the Debates. Rutgers University Press.
    This new series presents innovative titles pertaining to human origins, evolution, and behavior from a multi-disciplinary perspective.
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  19. der Steen & J. Wim (2000). Evolution as Natural History: A Philosophical Analysis. Praeger.
     
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  20.  9
    David Young (2007). The Discovery of Evolution. Cambridge University Press, in Association with Natural History Museum, London.
    The Discovery of Evolution explains what the theory of evolution is all about by providing a historical narrative of discovery. Some of the major puzzles that confront anyone studying living things are discussed and it details how these were solved from an evolutionary perspective. Beginning with the emergence of the early naturalists in the seventeenth century, the scientific discoveries that led up to and then flowed from Darwin and Wallace's theory of evolution by natural selection are then (...)
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  21.  4
    Robert J. O'Hara (1994). Review of Panchen's 'Classification, Evolution, and the Nature of Biology'. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 85 (1): 182–183.
  22. Ernst Mayr (2007). What Makes Biology Unique?: Considerations on the Autonomy of a Scientific Discipline. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of revised and new essays argues that biology is an autonomous science rather than a branch of the physical sciences. Ernst Mayr, widely considered the most eminent evolutionary biologist of the 20th century, offers insights on the history of evolutionary thought, critiques the conditions of philosophy to the science of biology, and comments on several of the major developments in evolutionary theory. Notably, Mayr explains that Darwin's theory of evolution is actually five separate theories, each with (...)
     
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  23.  1
    Peter J. Bowler (1985). Evolution: The History of an Idea. Journal of the History of Biology 18 (1):155-157.
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  24.  46
    John Haught (2009). Theology and Evolution: How Much Can Biology Explain? In Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press 246.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001788502; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 246-264.; Language(s): English; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  25. John C. Greene & James R. Moore (1989). History, Humanity, and Evolution Essays for John C. Greene. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  26. Giovanni Pinna, Michael T. Ghiselin, California Academy of Sciences & Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Milano (1996). Biology as History Papers From International Conferences Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale in Milan. Società Italiana di Scienze Naturali E Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Milano.
     
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  27.  27
    Marcello Barbieri (2003). The Organic Codes: An Introduction to Semantic Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The genetic code appeared on Earth with the first cells. The codes of cultural evolution arrived almost four billion years later. These are the only codes that are recognized by modern biology. In this book, however, Marcello Barbieri explains that there are many more organic codes in nature, and their appearance not only took place throughout the history of life but marked the major steps of that history. A code establishes a correspondence between two independent 'worlds', and (...)
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  28.  25
    Carl Zimmer (2001/2006). Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea. Harperperennial.
    This remarkable book presents a rich and up-to-date view of evolution that explores the far-reaching implications of Darwin's theory and emphasizes the power, significance, and relevance of evolution to our lives today. After all, we ourselves are the product of evolution, and we can tackle many of our gravest challenges -- from lethal resurgence of antiobiotic-resistant diseases to the wave of extinctions that looms before us -- with a sound understanding of the science.
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  29.  3
    Iain McCalman (2009). Darwin's Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution. W.W. Norton & Co..
    Profiles three British voyagers who became fierce defenders of Darwin's theory of evolution, tracing the lives and scientific discoveries of Joseph Hooker, Thomas Huxley, and Alfred Wallace during respective voyages to the southern ...
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  30. James Mark Baldwin (1902/2005). Development and Evolution: Including Psychophysical Evolution, Evolution by Orthoplasy, and the Theory of Genetic Modes. Blackburn Press.
  31. Massimo Pigliucci (2010). Okasha's Evolution and the Levels of Selection: Toward a Broader Conception of Theoretical Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):405-415.
    The debate about the levels of selection has been one of the most controversial both in evolutionary biology and in philosophy of science. Okasha’s book makes the sort of contribution that simply will not be able to be ignored by anyone interested in this field for many years to come. However, my interest here is in highlighting some examples of how Okasha goes about discussing his material to suggest that his book is part of an increasingly interesting trend that sees (...)
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  32. Loren C. Eiseley (1958/1961). Darwin's Century: Evolution and the Men Who Discovered It. Anchor Books.
     
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  33.  31
    Gordon Lindsay Campbell (2003). Lucretius on Creation and Evolution: A Commentary on De Rerum Natura, Book Five, Lines 772-1104. Oxford University Press.
    Lucretius' account of the origin of life, the origin of species, and human prehistory (first century BC) is the longest and most detailed account extant from the ancient world. It is a mechanistic theory that does away with the need for any divine design, and has been seen as a forerunner of Darwin's theory of evolution. This commentary seeks to locate Lucretius in both the ancient and modern contexts. The recent revival of creationism makes this study particularly relevant to (...)
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  34.  2
    Maureen A. O'Malley & Staffan Müller-Wille (2010). The Cell as Nexus: Connections Between the History, Philosophy and Science of Cell Biology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):169-171.
    Although the cell is commonly addressed as the unit of life, historians and philosophers have devoted relatively little attention to this concept in comparison to other fundamental concepts of biology such as the gene or species. As a partial remedy to this neglect, we introduce the cell as a major point of connection between various disciplinary approaches, epistemic strategies, technological vectors and overarching biological processes such as metabolism, growth, reproduction and evolution. We suggest that the role of the cell (...)
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  35.  6
    Phillip Honenberger (2015). Grene and Hull on Types and Typological Thinking in Biology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 50:13-25.
    Marjorie Grene (1910-2009) and David Hull (1935-2010) were among the most influential voices in late twentieth-century philosophy of biology. But, as Grene and Hull pointed out in published discussions of one another’s work over the course of nearly forty years, they disagreed strongly on fundamental issues. Among these contested issues is the role of what is sometimes called “typology” and “typological thinking” in biology. In regard to taxonomy and the species problem, Hull joined Ernst Mayr’s construal of typological thinking as (...)
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  36. G. S. Carter (1957). A Hundred Years of Evolution. London, Sidgwick and Jackson.
     
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  37.  6
    Edward Clodd (1897/1972). Pioneers of Evolution From Thales to Huxley. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
  38. Martin Fichman (2002). Evolutionary Theory and Victorian Culture. Humanity Books.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Evolutionism in Cultural Context 13 -- 2. Social Darwinism(s) 51 -- 3. Transatlantic Evolutionism 73 -- 4. Debates on Human Evolution 97 -- 5. Wallace and Darwin: The Major Differences 123 -- 6. Evolutionary Ethics 145 -- 7. Evolution and Religion: Tensions and Accommodation 169 -- 8. The Contemporary Debates: "Creation Science"? 193.
     
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  39. Jean Rostand (1961). The Orion Book of Evolution. New York, Orion Press.
     
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  40.  17
    Michael R. Dietrich (1998). Paradox and Persuasion: Negotiating the Place of Molecular Evolution Within Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 31 (1):85 - 111.
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  41. Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (2008). From Embryology to Evo-Devo: A History of Developmental Evolution. Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):579-582.
     
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  42. Thomas Junker (2004). Die Zweite Darwinsche Revolution: Geschichte des Synthetischen Darwinismus in Deutschland 1924 Bis 1950. Basilisken-Presse.
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  43.  10
    Michel Morange (2012). From Experimental Systems to Evolutionary Biology: An Impossible Journey? History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):27-32.
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  44.  5
    Christine Manganaro (2013). Theodore W. Pietsch, Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):761-763.
  45.  3
    Joe Cain (2005). Book Review: Edward J. Larson, Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory , Xiv + 337 Pp., Illus., $21.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):172-174.
  46. James R. Moore & Adrian Desmond (1991). History, Humanity and Evolution: Essays for John C. Greene. Journal of the History of Biology 24 (1):155-161.
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  47.  41
    Martinez Hewlett (2006). Molecular Biology and Religion. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 172-186.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712123; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 172-186.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 185-186.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  48.  3
    S. Schmitt (1999). [The work of Richard Goldschmidt: an attempt at a synthesis of genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary theory surrounding the concept of homeosis]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (3-4):381-399.
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  49.  83
    Gerard A. J. M. Jagers op Akkerhuis (2010). Towards a Hierarchical Definition of Life, the Organism, and Death. Foundations of Science 15 (3):245-262.
    Despite hundreds of definitions, no consensus exists on a definition of life or on the closely related and problematic definitions of the organism and death. These problems retard practical and theoretical development in, for example, exobiology, artificial life, biology and evolution. This paper suggests improving this situation by basing definitions on a theory of a generalized particle hierarchy. This theory uses the common denominator of the “operator” for a unified ranking of both particles and organisms, from elementary particles to (...)
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  50.  81
    Jacek Tomczyk & Grzegorz Bugajak (2008). Between Evolution and Creation: A Forgotten Lesson. Omega. Indian Journal of Science and Religion 7 (2):6–21.
    Heated debates stemming from the confrontation of scientific knowledge with the biblical picture of the creation of man, which had followed the publication of Darwin's theory of evolution, became far less prominent in the second half of the 20th century. This was due to two factors: first, the theory of evolution was partly accepted in theological circles and at the same time biologists showed a growing awareness of the limited epistemological scope of the competence of the natural sciences. (...)
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