Search results for 'Evolution (Biology Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

984 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Sahotra Sarkar & Jason Scott Robert (2001). Biology and Philosophy Special Issue for 2003 – Evolution and Development. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):573-573.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  29
    Michael Ruse (2006). The Evolution of the Philosophy of Biology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (3):437-442.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Elliott Sober (2000). Philosophy of Biology. Westview Press.
    Perhaps because of it implications for our understanding of human nature, recent philosophy of biology has seen what might be the most dramatic work in the philosophies of the ”special” sciences. This drama has centered on evolutionary theory, and in the second edition of this textbook, Elliott Sober introduces the reader to the most important issues of these developments. With a rare combination of technical sophistication and clarity of expression, Sober engages both the higher level of theory and the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   122 citations  
  4.  3
    John Collier (1985). Evolution at a Crossroads the New Biology and the New Philosophy of Science. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  5
    David Boersema (2006). Review of “Embryology, Epigenesis, and Evolution” and “Philosophy of Experimental Biology”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 7 (1):1.
  6.  22
    Sahotra Sarkar & JasonScott Robert (2001). Biology and Philosophy Special Issue for 2003 – Evolution and Development. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):573-573.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  25
    Sahotra Sarkar & Anya Plutynski (eds.) (2008). A Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Blackwell Pub..
    Comprised of essays by top scholars in the field, this volume offers concise overviews of philosophical issues raised by biology. Brings together a team of eminent scholars to explore the philosophical issues raised by biology Addresses traditional and emerging topics, spanning molecular biology and genetics, evolution, developmental biology, immunology, ecology, mind and behaviour, neuroscience, and experimentation Begins with a thorough introduction to the field Goes beyond previous treatments that focused only on evolution to give equal attention to other (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8.  13
    Kostas Kampourakis & Ross H. Nehm (2014). History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Evolution: Students’ Conceptions and Explanations. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 377-399.
    A large body of work in science education indicates that evolution is one of the least understood and accepted scientific theories. Although scholarship from the history and philosophy of science (HPS) has shed light on many conceptual and pedagogical issues in evolution education, HPS-informed studies of evolution education are also characterized by conceptual weaknesses. In this chapter, we critically review such studies and find that some work lacks historically accurate characterizations of student ideas (preconceptions and misconceptions). (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  34
    David L. Hull (2000). Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Hull aims to distinguish between those characteristics that are contingent features of selection and those that are essential. Science and Selection brings (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  10.  9
    William C. Wimsatt (1999). Generativity, Entrenchment, Evolution, and Innateness: Philosophy, Evolutionary Biology, and Conceptual Foundations of Science. In V. Harcastle (ed.), Where Biology Meets Psychology. 137--179.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  2
    Marc Ereshefsky (1991). The Metaphysics of Evolution: David Hull,(Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1989), Viii+ 331 Pp., ISBN 0-7914-0211-8 Hardback $73.50, Paperback $24.95. Michael Ruse (Ed.), What the Philosophy of Biology Is: Essays Dedicated to David Hull (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1989), Ix+ 337 Pp., ISBN 90-247-3778-8 Hardback Dfl 180.00/$99.00/£ 59.00. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (3):525-532.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Kent E. Holsinger (1987). David J. Depew and Bruce H. Weber, Eds., Evolution at a Crossroads: The New Biology and the New Philosophy of Science Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 7 (1):7-9.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  4
    John Collier (1986). Book Review:Evolution at a Crossroads: The New Biology and the New Philosophy of Science David J. Depew, Bruce H. Weber. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 53 (4):614-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Kim Sterelny (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Development, Evolution, and Adaptation. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. William A. Rottschaefer (1985). Biology and Philosophy in Fruitful Interchange , "Evolution at the Crossroads: Biology and the New Philosophy of Science"). [REVIEW] Behavior and Philosophy 13 (2):187.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. David J. Depew & Bruce W. Weber (1985). Evolution at a Crossroads: The New Biology and the New Philosophy of Science. Behaviorism 13 (2):187-190.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   26 citations  
  17.  37
    Ernst Mayr (1988). Toward a New Philosophy of Biology: Observations of an Evolutionist. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    Provides a philosophical analysis of such biological concepts as natural selection, adaptation, speciation, and evolution.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   93 citations  
  18.  4
    Staffan Mueller-Wille (2007). Philosophy of Biology Beyond Evolution. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 2 (1):111-112.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  12
    Alirio Rosales (2007). The Philosophy of Evolutionary Biology in Theory and Practice: Making Sense of Evolution: The Conceptual Foundations of Evolutionary Biology Massimo Pigliucci and Jonathan Kaplan Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2006 (300 Pp; $28.00 Pbk; ISBN 0226668371). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 2 (2):205-207.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. David Hull (1986). Evolution at a Crossroads: The New Biology and the New Philosophy of Science by David J. Depew; Bruce H. Weber. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 77:128-129.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. David L. Hull (1986). Evolution at a Crossroads: The New Biology and the New Philosophy of ScienceDavid J. Depew Bruce H. Weber. Isis 77 (1):128-129.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. A. C. Love (ed.) (2015). Conceptual Change in Biology: Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Evolution and Development: Boston Studies in Philosophy of Science. Springer.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  21
    Timothy Shanahan (2004). The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation, and Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected from the beginning and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  24. D. R. Brooks (1988). Evolution as Entropy: Toward a Unified Theory of Biology. University of Chicago Press.
    "By combining recent advances in the physical sciences with some of the novel ideas, techniques, and data of modern biology, this book attempts to achieve a new and different kind of evolutionary synthesis. I found it to be challenging, fascinating, infuriating, and provocative, but certainly not dull."--James H, Brown, University of New Mexico "This book is unquestionably mandatory reading not only for every living biologist but for generations of biologists to come."--Jack P. Hailman, Animal Behaviour , review of the first (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   67 citations  
  25.  35
    Maureen A. O’Malley (2010). Ernst Mayr, the Tree of Life, and Philosophy of Biology. Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):529-552.
    Ernst Mayr’s influence on philosophy of biology has given the field a particular perspective on evolution, phylogeny and life in general. Using debates about the tree of life as a guide, I show how Mayrian evolutionary biology excludes numerous forms of life and many important evolutionary processes. Hybridization and lateral gene transfer are two of these processes, and they occur frequently, with important outcomes in all domains of life. Eukaryotes appear to have a more tree-like history because successful (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26. Adolf Meyer (1964). The Historico-Philosophical Background of the Modern Evolution-Biology. Leiden, E. J. Brill.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  8
    Eugene Earnshaw (2011). Evolution Beyond Biology: Examining the Evolutionary Economics of Nelson and Winter. Biological Theory 6 (4):301-310.
    Nelson and Winter’s An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change (1982) was the foundational work of what has become the thriving sub-discipline of evolutionary economics. In attempting to develop an alternative to neoclassical economics, the authors looked to borrow basic ideas from biology, in particular a concept of economic “natural selection.” However, the evolutionary models they construct in their seminal work are in many respects quite different from the models of evolutionary biology. There is no reproduction in any usual sense, “mutation” (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  4
    Paul Thompson (1989). Philosophy of Biology Under Attack: Stent Vs. Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 4 (3):345-351.
  29.  25
    Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.) (2010). Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell Pub..
    This collection of specially commissioned essays puts top scholars head to head to debate the central issues in the lively and fast growing field of philosophy ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  7
    Florian von Schilcher (1984). Philosophy, Evolution, and Human Nature. Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  31.  14
    Martin H. Brinkworth & Friedel Weinert (eds.) (2012). Evolution 2.0: Implications of Darwinism in Philosophy and the Social and Natural Sciences. Springer.
    These essays by leading philosophers and scientists focus on recent ideas at the forefront of modern Darwinism, showcasing and exploring the challenges they raise as well as open problems.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Ronald Good (1981). The Philosophy of Evolution. Dovecote Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Shunkichi Matsumoto (2010). Shinkaron Wa Naze Tetsugaku No Mondai Ni Naru No Ka: Seibutsugaku No Tetsugaku No Ima = Why Does Evolution Matter to Philosophy? Keisō Shobō.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Michael Ruse (2009). Defining Darwin: Essays on the History and Philosophy of Evolutionary Biology. Prometheus Books.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  4
    Brian Garvey (2006). Philosophy of Biology. Acumen.
    This major new series in the philosophy of science aims to provide a new generation of textbooks for the subject. The series will not only offer fresh treatments of core topics in the theory and methodology of scientific knowledge, but also introductions to newer areas of the discipline. Furthermore, the series will cover topics in current science that raise significant foundational issues both for scientific theory and for philosophy more generally. Biology raises distinct questions of its own not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  43
    Maureen A. O’Malley & John Dupré (2007). Size Doesn't Matter: Towards a More Inclusive Philosophy of Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 22 (2):155-191.
    Philosophers of biology, along with everyone else, generally perceive life to fall into two broad categories, the microbes and macrobes, and then pay most of their attention to the latter. ‘Macrobe’ is the word we propose for larger life forms, and we use it as part of an argument for microbial equality. We suggest that taking more notice of microbes – the dominant life form on the planet, both now and throughout evolutionary history – will transform some of the (...) of biology’s standard ideas on ontology, evolution, taxonomy and biodiversity. We set out a number of recent developments in microbiology – including biofilm formation, chemotaxis, quorum sensing and gene transfer – that highlight microbial capacities for cooperation and communication and break down conventional thinking that microbes are solely or primarily single-celled organisms. These insights also bring new perspectives to the levels of selection debate, as well as to discussions of the evolution and nature of multicellularity, and to neo-Darwinian understandings of evolutionary mechanisms. We show how these revisions lead to further complications for microbial classification and the philosophies of systematics and biodiversity. Incorporating microbial insights into the philosophy of biology will challenge many of its assumptions, but also give greater scope and depth to its investigations. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   36 citations  
  37. Stavros Ioannidis (2008). How Development Changes Evolution: Conceptual and Historical Issues in Evolutionary Developmental Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):567-578.
    Evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo) is a new and rapidly developing field of biology which focuses on questions in the intersection of evolution and development and has been seen by many as a potential synthesis of these two fields. This synthesis is the topic of the books reviewed here. Integrating Evolution and Development (edited by Roger Sansom and Robert Brandon), is a collection of papers on conceptual issues in Evo-Devo, while From Embryology to Evo-Devo (edited by Manfred Laubichler and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38. Ernst Mayr (2007). What Makes Biology Unique?: Considerations on the Autonomy of a Scientific Discipline. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of revised and new essays argues that biology is an autonomous science rather than a branch of the physical sciences. Ernst Mayr, widely considered the most eminent evolutionary biologist of the 20th century, offers insights on the history of evolutionary thought, critiques the conditions of philosophy to the science of biology, and comments on several of the major developments in evolutionary theory. Notably, Mayr explains that Darwin's theory of evolution is actually five separate theories, each with (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  39.  59
    Samir Okasha (2006). Evolution and the Levels of Selection. Oxford University Press.
    Does natural selection act primarily on individual organisms, on groups, on genes, or on whole species? The question of levels of selection - on which biologists and philosophers have long disagreed - is central to evolutionary theory and to the philosophy of biology. Samir Okasha's comprehensive analysis gives a clear account of the philosophical issues at stake in the current debate.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   69 citations  
  40. John Lemos (2008). Commonsense Darwinism: Evolution, Morality, and the Human Condition. Open Court.
    Introduction -- Defending a socio-biological account of morality -- Non-objectivist evolutionary ethics -- Recent objectivist approaches to evolutionary ethics -- Sketch of an Aristotelian evolutionary ethics -- Evolutionary biology and the moral status of animals -- Faith, reason, and evolutionary epistemology -- Psychological egoism and evolutionary biology -- Evolution and free will : darwinian non-naturalism defended -- Recent developments in philosophy of evolution.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. David L. Hull & Paul Griffiths (1994). Trees of Life: Essays in Philosophy of Biology. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):105-112.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  42.  52
    Matt Gers (2011). The Long Reach of Philosophy of Biology. Biology and Philosophy 26 (3):439-447.
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Biology covers a broad range of topics in this field. It is not just a textbook focusing on evolutionary theory but encompasses ethics, social science and behaviour too. This essay outlines the scope of the work, discusses some points on methodology in the philosophy of biology, and then moves on to a more detailed analysis of cultural evolution and the applicability of a philosophy of biology toolkit to the social sciences. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  49
    Elliott Sober (1994). From a Biological Point of View: Essays in Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Elliott Sober is one of the leading philosophers of science and is a former winner of the Lakatos Prize, the major award in the field. This new collection of essays will appeal to a readership that extends well beyond the frontiers of the philosophy of science. Sober shows how ideas in evolutionary biology bear in significant ways on traditional problems in philosophy of mind and language, epistemology, and metaphysics. Amongst the topics addressed are psychological egoism, solipsism, and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   55 citations  
  44.  16
    Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  31
    Wim J. van der Steen (2000). Methodological Problems in Evolutionary Biology. XIII. Evolution and Knowledge. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (1):73-84.
    Evolutionary epistemologists aim to explain the evolution of cognitive capacities underlying human knowledge and also the processes that generate knowledge, for example in science. There can be no doubt that our cognitive capacities are due in part to our evolutionary heritage. But this is an uninformative thesis. All features of organism have indeed been shaped by evolution. A substantive evolutionary explanation of cognition would have to provide details about the evolutionary processes involved. Evolutionary epistemology has not provided any (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  10
    Stephen M. Downes (2002). A Review of David Hull, Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):739-742.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  7
    Robert J. O'Hara (1988). Homage to Clio, or, Toward an Historical Philosophy for Evolutionary Biology. Systematic Zoology 37 (2): 142–155.
    Discussions of the theory and practice of systematics and evolutionary biology have heretofore revolved around the views of philosophers of science. I reexamine these issues from the different perspective of the philosophy of history. Just as philosophers of history distinguish between chronicle (non-interpretive or non-explanatory writing) and narrative history (interpretive or explanatory writing), I distinguish between evolutionary chronicle (cladograms, broadly construed) and narrative evolutionary history. Systematics is the discipline which estimates the evolutionary chronicle. ¶ Explanations of the events described (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  48.  1
    Michael Ruse (1988). Philosophy of Biology Today. State University of New York Press.
    This short and highly accessible volume opens up the subject of the philosophy of biology to professionals and to students in both disciplines. The text covers briefly and clearly all of the pertinent topics in the subject, dealing with both human and non-human issues, and quite uniquely surveying not only scholars in the English-speaking world but others elsewhere, including the Eastern block. As molecular biologists peer ever more deeply into life’s mysteries, there are those who fear that such ‘reductionism’ (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  49.  29
    Marcello Barbieri (2003). The Organic Codes: An Introduction to Semantic Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The genetic code appeared on Earth with the first cells. The codes of cultural evolution arrived almost four billion years later. These are the only codes that are recognized by modern biology. In this book, however, Marcello Barbieri explains that there are many more organic codes in nature, and their appearance not only took place throughout the history of life but marked the major steps of that history. A code establishes a correspondence between two independent 'worlds', and the codemaker (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   40 citations  
  50.  25
    William S. Cooper (2001). The Evolution of Reason: Logic as a Branch of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The formal systems of logic have ordinarily been regarded as independent of biology, but recent developments in evolutionary theory suggest that biology and logic may be intimately interrelated. In this book, Cooper outlines a theory of rationality in which logical law emerges as an intrinsic aspect of evolutionary biology. This biological perspective on logic, though at present unorthodox, could change traditional ideas about the reasoning process. Cooper examines the connections between logic and evolutionary biology and illustrates how logical rules are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 984