Search results for 'Evolution of Genetic Systems' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. H. G. Hill (1939). The Evolution of Genetic Systems. The Eugenics Review 31 (1):63.score: 612.0
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  2. Kim Sterelny, Kelly C. Smith & Michael Dickison (1996). The Extended Replicator. Biology and Philosophy 11 (3):377-403.score: 576.0
    This paper evaluates and criticises the developmental systems conception of evolution and develops instead an extension of the gene's eye conception of evolution. We argue (i) Dawkin's attempt to segregate developmental and evolutionary issues about genes is unsatisfactory. On plausible views of development it is arbitrary to single out genes as the units of selection. (ii) The genotype does not carry information about the phenotype in any way that distinguishes the role of the genes in development from (...)
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  3. Ehud Lamm (2010). Review Of: Julian Huxley, Evolution: The Modern Synthesis – The Definitive Edition. [REVIEW] Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science.score: 564.0
    The review focuses on Huxley’s debt to Richard Goldschmidt and Cyril Darlington. I discuss the conceptions of the genome developed by Goldschmidt and Darlington and their continuing relevance.
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  4. David Chalmers (1992). The Evolution of Learning: An Experiment in Genetic Connectionism. In Connectionist Models: Proceedings of the 1990 Summer School Workshop. Morgan Kaufmann.score: 552.0
    This paper explores how an evolutionary process can produce systems that learn. A general framework for the evolution of learning is outlined, and is applied to the task of evolving mechanisms suitable for supervised learning in single-layer neural networks. Dynamic properties of a network’s information-processing capacity are encoded genetically, and these properties are subjected to selective pressure based on their success in producing adaptive behavior in diverse environments. As a result of selection and genetic recombination, various successful (...)
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  5. Kepa Ruiz-Mirazo & Alvaro Moreno (2013). Synthetic Biology: Challenging Life in Order to Grasp, Use, or Extend It. Biological Theory 8 (4):376-382.score: 526.0
    In this short contribution we explore the historical roots of recent synthetic approaches in biology and try to assess their real potential, as well as identify future hurdles or the reasons behind some of the main difficulties they currently face. We suggest that part of these difficulties might not be just the result of our present lack of adequate technical skills or understanding, but could spring directly from the nature of the biological phenomenon itself. In particular, if life is conceived (...)
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  6. Paul Griffiths & Russell Gray, The Developmental Systems Perspective: Organism-Environment Systems as Units of Development and Evolution.score: 516.0
    Developmental systems theory is an attempt to sum up the ideas of a research tradition in developmental psychobiology that goes back at least to Daniel Lehrman’s work in the 1950s. It yields a representation of evolution that is quite capable of accommodating the traditional themes of natural selection and also the new results that are emerging from evolutionary developmental biology. But it adds something else - a framework for thinking about development and evolution without the distorting dichotomization (...)
     
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  7. Isaac Salazar-Ciudad (2013). Evolution in Biological and Non-Biological Systems: The Origins of Life. Biological Theory 7 (1):26-37.score: 486.0
    A replicator is simply something that makes copies of itself. There are hypothetical replicators (e.g., self-catalyzing chemical cycles) that are suspected to be unable to exhibit heritable variation. Variation in any of their constituent molecules would not lead them to produce offspring with those new variant molecules. Copying, such as in DNA replication or in xerox machines, allows any sequence to be remade and then sequence variations to be inherited. This distinction has been used against non-RNA-world hypotheses: without RNA replication (...)
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  8. Nicholas Shea (2012). Genetic Representation Explains the Cluster of Innateness-Related Properties. Mind and Language 27 (4):466-493.score: 480.0
    The concept of innateness is used to make inferences between various better-understood properties, like developmental canalization, evolutionary adaptation, heritability, species-typicality, and so on (‘innateness-related properties’). This article uses a recently-developed account of the representational content carried by inheritance systems like the genome to explain why innateness-related properties cluster together, especially in non-human organisms. Although inferences between innateness-related properties are deductively invalid, and lead to false conclusions in many actual cases, where some aspect of a phenotypic trait develops in reliance (...)
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  9. Anton V. Sukhoverkhov & Carol A. Fowler (forthcoming). Why Language Evolution Needs Memory: Systems and Ecological Approaches. Biosemiotics:1-19.score: 456.0
    The main purpose of this article is to consider the significance of different types of memory and non-genetic (‘inclusive’, ‘extended’, ‘soft’) inheritance and different biosemiotic systems for the origin and evolution of language. It presents language and memory as distributed (objectified, external), heteronomous and system-determined processes implemented in biological and social domains. The article emphasises that language and other sign systems are both (1) ecological and inductive systems that were caused by and always correlate with (...)
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  10. Tom Wenseleers & Annette Van Oystaeyen (2011). Unusual Modes of Reproduction in Social Insects: Shedding Light on the Evolutionary Paradox of Sex. Bioessays 33 (12):927-937.score: 444.0
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  11. Vincent Bontems (2009). Gilbert Simondon's Genetic “Mecanology”and the Understanding of Laws of Technical Evolution. Techné 13 (1):1-12.score: 441.0
    Since the 1930’s, several attempts have been made to develop a general theory of technical systems or objects and their evolution: in France, Jacques Lafitte, André Leroi-Gourhan, Bertrand Gille, Yves Deforge, and Gilbert Simondon are the main representatives of this trend. In this paper, we focus on the work of Simondon: his analysis of technical progress is based on the hypothesis that technology has its own laws and that customer demand has no paramount influence upon the evolution (...)
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  12. R. Brown, J. F. Glazebrook & I. C. Baianu (2007). A Conceptual Construction of Complexity Levels Theory in Spacetime Categorical Ontology: Non-Abelian Algebraic Topology, Many-Valued Logics and Dynamic Systems. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 17 (3-4):409-493.score: 438.0
    A novel conceptual framework is introduced for the Complexity Levels Theory in a Categorical Ontology of Space and Time. This conceptual and formal construction is intended for ontological studies of Emergent Biosystems, Super-complex Dynamics, Evolution and Human Consciousness. A claim is defended concerning the universal representation of an item’s essence in categorical terms. As an essential example, relational structures of living organisms are well represented by applying the important categorical concept of natural transformations to biomolecular reactions and relational structures (...)
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  13. Alex Mesoudi, Simon Blanchet, Anne Charmantier, Étienne Danchin, Laurel Fogarty, Eva Jablonka, Kevin N. Laland, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Gerd B. Müller, F. John Odling-Smee & Benoît Pujol (2013). Is Non-Genetic Inheritance Just a Proximate Mechanism? A Corroboration of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis. Biological Theory 7 (3):189-195.score: 438.0
    What role does non-genetic inheritance play in evolution? In recent work we have independently and collectively argued that the existence and scope of non-genetic inheritance systems, including epigenetic inheritance, niche construction/ecological inheritance, and cultural inheritance—alongside certain other theory revisions—necessitates an extension to the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis (MS) in the form of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). However, this argument has been challenged on the grounds that non-genetic inheritance systems are exclusively proximate mechanisms that serve (...)
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  14. Ward B. Watt (2013). Causal Mechanisms of Evolution and the Capacity for Niche Construction. Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):757-766.score: 432.0
    Ernst Mayr proposed a distinction between “proximate”, mechanistic, and “ultimate”, evolutionary, causes of biological phenomena. This dichotomy has influenced the thinking of many biologists, but it is increasingly perceived as impeding modern studies of evolutionary processes, including study of “niche construction” in which organisms alter their environments in ways supportive of their evolutionary success. Some still find value for this dichotomy in its separation of answers to “how?” versus “why?”questions about evolution. But “why is A?” questions about evolution (...)
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  15. Nicholas Shea (2012). Inherited Representations Are Read in Development. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (1):1-31.score: 420.0
    Recent theoretical work has identified a tightly-constrained sense in which genes carry representational content. Representational properties of the genome are founded in the transmission of DNA over phylogenetic time and its role in natural selection. However, genetic representation is not just relevant to questions of selection and evolution. This paper goes beyond existing treatments and argues for the heterodox view that information generated by a process of selection over phylogenetic time can be read in ontogenetic time, in the (...)
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  16. Tadeusz Wieslaw Zawidzki (1998). Competing Models of Stability in Complex, Evolving Systems: Kauffman Vs. Simon. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (4):541-554.score: 393.0
    I criticize Herbert Simon's argument for the claim that complex natural systems must constitute decomposable, mereological or functional hierarchies. The argument depends on certain assumptions about the requirements for the successful evolution of complex systems, most importantly, the existence of stable, intermediate stages in evolution. Simon offers an abstract model of any process that succeeds in meeting these requirements. This model necessarily involves construction through a decomposable hierarchy, and thus suggests that any complex, natural, (...)
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  17. Helena Knyazeva (2005). Figures of Time in Evolution of Complex Systems. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):289 - 304.score: 384.8
    Owing to intensive development of the theory of self-organization of complex systems called also synergetics, profound changes in our notions of time occur. Whereas at the beginning of the 20th century, natural sciences, by picking up the general spirit of Einstein's theory of relativity, consider a geometrization as an ideal, i.e. try to represent time and force interactions through space and the changes of its properties, nowadays, at the beginning of the 21st century, time turns to be in the (...)
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  18. Robert Zimmer, Robert Holte & Alan MacDonald (1997). The Impact of Representation on the Efficacy of Artificial Intelligence: The Case of Genetic Algorithms. [REVIEW] AI and Society 11 (1-2):76-87.score: 384.0
    This paper is about representations for Artificial Intelligence systems. All of the results described in it involve engineering the representation to make AI systems more effective. The main AI techniques studied here are varieties of search: path-finding in graphs, and probablilistic searching via simulated annealing and genetic algorithms. The main results are empirical findings about the granularity of representation in implementations of genetic algorithms. We conclude by proposing a new algorithm, called “Long-Term Evolution,” which is (...)
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  19. Alexei A. Sharov (2009). Role of Utility and Inference in the Evolution of Functional Information. Biosemiotics 2 (1):101-115.score: 384.0
    Functional information means an encoded network of functions in living organisms from molecular signaling pathways to an organism’s behavior. It is represented by two components: code and an interpretation system, which together form a self-sustaining semantic closure. Semantic closure allows some freedom between components because small variations of the code are still interpretable. The interpretation system consists of inference rules that control the correspondence between the code and the function (phenotype) and determines the shape of the fitness landscape. The utility (...)
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  20. Brian K. Hall (2001). Organic Selection: Proximate Environmental Effects on the Evolution of Morphology and Behaviour. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 16 (2):215-237.score: 369.0
    Organic selection (the Baldwin Effect) by which an environmentally elicitedphenotypic adaptation comes under genotypic control following selectionwas proposed independently in 1896 by the psychologists James Baldwinand Conwy Lloyd Morgan and by the paleontologist Henry Fairfield Osborn.Modified forms of organic selection were proposed as autonomization bySchmalhausen in 1938, as genetic assimilation by Waddington in 1942, andas an explanation for evolution in changing environments or for speciationby Matsuda and West-Eberhard in the 1980s. Organic selection as amechanism mediating proximate environmental effects (...)
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  21. Helena Knyazeva & Sergei Kurdyumov (2001). Nonlinear Synthesis and Co-Evolution of Complex Systems. World Futures 57 (3):239-261.score: 366.8
    Today a change is imperative in approaching global problems: what is needed is not arm-twisting and power politics, but searching for ways of co-evolution in the complex social and geopolitical systems of the world. The modern theory of self-organization of complex systems provides us with an understanding of the possible forms of coexistence of heterogeneous social and geopolitical structures at different stages of development regarding the different paths of their sustainable co-evolutionary development. The theory argues that the (...)
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  22. Leonid Grinin, Alexander Markov, Markov & Andrey Korotayev (2009). Aromorphoses in Biological and Social Evolution: Some General Rules for Biological and Social Forms of Macroevolution. Social Evolution and History 8 (2).score: 354.0
    The comparison between biological and social macroevolution is a very important (though insufficiently studied) subject whose analysis renders new significant possibilities to comprehend the processes, trends, mechanisms, and peculiarities of each of the two types of macroevolution. Of course, there are a few rather important (and very understandable) differences between them; however, it appears possible to identify a number of fundamental similarities. One may single out at least three fundamental sets of factors determining those similarities. First of all, those similarities (...)
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  23. L. Dennis, R. W. Gray, L. H. Kauffman, J. Brender McNair & N. J. Woolf (2009). A Framework Linking Non-Living and Living Systems: Classification of Persistence, Survival and Evolution Transitions. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 14 (3):217-238.score: 351.0
    We propose a framework for analyzing the development, operation and failure to survive of all things, living, non-living or organized groupings. This framework is a sequence of developments that improve survival capability. Framework processes range from origination of any entity/system, to the development of increased survival capability and development of life-forms and organizations that use intelligence. This work deals with a series of developmental changes that arise from the uncovering of emergent properties. The framework is intended to be general, but (...)
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  24. Peter Allen (2000). Knowledge, Ignorance and the Evolution of Complex Systems. World Futures 55 (1):37-70.score: 348.8
    The paper explores the basis for decision?making and policy with regard to the Environment. Clearly these should be based on knowledge of possible consequences and accompanying risk assessments involving the linked behaviour of the many interacting human actors within a socio?economic system and the ecological, and physical systems in which they are embedded. The paper describes the Complex Systems approach to these problems, showing the kind of models that are required in order to obtain whatever limited knowledge is (...)
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  25. Alexander Laszlo & Kathia Laszlo (2002). The Evolution of Evolutionary Systems Design. World Futures 58 (5 & 6):351 – 363.score: 348.8
    This article presents the genesis of Evolutionary Systems Design (ESD) as a praxis that draws on General Evolution Theory and Social Systems Design methodology, in addition to Critical Systems Theory, to engage in lifelong learning and human development in partnership with the Earth. The contributions of Bela H. Banathy to the creation of ESD are portrayed as bridging evolutionary consciousness and evolutionary action. Following a brief description of the inspiration and mentorship provided by Bela in this (...)
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  26. James Griesemer, Matthew H. Haber, Grant Yamashita & Lisa Gannett (2005). Critical Notice: Cycles of Contingency – Developmental Systems and Evolution. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):517-544.score: 346.5
    The themes, problems and challenges of developmental systems theory as described in Cycles of Contingency are discussed. We argue in favor of a robust approach to philosophical and scientific problems of extended heredity and the integration of behavior, development, inheritance, and evolution. Problems with Sterelny's proposal to evaluate inheritance systems using his `Hoyle criteria' are discussed and critically evaluated. Additional support for a developmental systems perspective is sought in evolutionary studies of performance and behavior modulation of (...)
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  27. Brian Skyrms, Evolution of Signaling Systems with Multiple Senders and Receivers.score: 344.3
    To coordinate action, information must be transmitted, processed, and utilized to make decisions. Transmission of information requires the existence of a signaling system in which the signals that are exchanged are coordinated with the appropriate content. Signaling systems in nature range from quorum signaling in bacteria [Schauder and Bassler (2001), Kaiser (2004)], through the dance of the bees [Dyer and Seeley (1991)], birdcalls [Hailman, Ficken, and Ficken (1985), Gyger, Marler and Pickert (1987), Evans, Evans, and Marler (1994), Charrier (...)
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  28. Lakshmi J. Gogate (2006). Dynamic Systems and the Evolution of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):286-287.score: 342.0
    Locke & Bogin (L&B) suggest that theoretical principles of ontogenetic development apply to language evolution. If this is the case, then evolutionary theory should utilize epigenetic theories of development to theorize, model, and elucidate the evolution of language wherever possible. In this commentary, I evoke principles of dynamic systems theory to evaluate the evolutionary phenomena presented in the target article.
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  29. Allan Combs & Sally Goerner (1997). The Evolution of Consciousness as a Self-Organizing Information System in the Society of Other Such Systems. World Futures 50 (1):609-616.score: 342.0
    (1997). The evolution of consciousness as a self‐organizing information system in the society of other such systems. World Futures: Vol. 50, No. 1-4, pp. 609-616.
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  30. Patrick Humphreys & Garrick Jones (2006). The Evolution of Group Decision Support Systems to Enable Collaborative Authoring of Outcomes. World Futures 62 (3):193 – 222.score: 342.0
    This article draws on analysis of a variety of problems emerging from practical applications of Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS) to propose a fundamental evolution of decision support models from the traditional single decision-spine model to the decision-hedgehog. It positions decision making through the construction of narratives making the rhizome that constitutes the body of the hedgehog with the fundamental aim of enriching understanding of the contexts of decision making. Localized processes constructing and exploring prescriptions for action within (...)
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  31. Patrick Grim, Evolution of Communication with a Spatialized Genetic Algorithm.score: 342.0
    We extend previous work by modeling evolution of communication using a spatialized genetic algorithm which recombines strategies purely locally. Here cellular automata are used as a spatialized environment in which individuals gain points by capturing drifting food items and are 'harmed' if they fail to hide from migrating predators. Our individuals are capable of making one of two arbitrary sounds, heard only locally by their immediate neighbors. They can respond to sounds from their neighbors by opening their mouths (...)
     
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  32. Mika Pantzar (1993). Editorial Introduction to Special Issue on Evolution of Socio-Economic Systems. World Futures 37 (2):1-3.score: 342.0
    (1993). Editorial introduction to special issue on evolution of socio‐economic systems. World Futures: Vol. 37, The Evolution of Socio-Economic Systems, pp. 1-3.
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  33. Tyler J. Wereha & Timothy P. Racine (2009). Belief in Evolved Belief Systems: Artifact of a Limited Evolutionary Model? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):537-538.score: 342.0
    Belief in evolved belief systems stems from using a population-genetic model of evolution that misconstrues the developmental relationship between genes and behaviour, confuses notions of and and ignores the fundamental role of language in the development of human beliefs. We suggest that theories about the evolution of belief would be better grounded in a developmental model of evolution.
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  34. Russell Powell & Allen Buchanan (2011). Breaking Evolution's Chains: The Prospect of Deliberate Genetic Modification in Humans. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (1):6-27.score: 337.5
    Many philosophers invoke the "wisdom of nature" in arguing for varying degrees of caution in the development and use of genetic enhancement technologies. Because they view natural selection as akin to a master engineer that creates functionally and morally optimal design, these authors tend to regard genetic intervention with suspicion. In Part II, we examine and ultimately reject the evolutionary assumptions that underlie the master engineer analogy (MEA). By highlighting the constraints on ordinary unassisted evolution, we show (...)
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  35. Marco A. Janssen (2005). Evolution of Institutional Rules: An Immune System Perspective: Parallels of Lymphocytes and Institutional Rules. Complexity 11 (1):16-23.score: 337.5
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  36. Lucas Alexander Haley Commons-Miller, Michael Lamport Commons & Geoffrey David Commons (2008). Genetic Engineering and the Speciation of Superions From Humans. World Futures 64 (5 - 7):436 – 443.score: 336.0
    Using ideas from evolution and postformal stages of hierarchical complexity, a hypothetical scenario, premised on genetic engineering advances, portrays the development of a new humanoid species, Superions. How would Superions impact and treat current humans? If the Superion scenario came to pass, it would be the ultimate genocidal terrorism of eliminating an entire species, Homo Sapiens. We speculate about defenses Homo Sapiens might mount. The tasks to relate two species (systems) constitutes a postformal, Metasystematic task. Developing a (...)
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  37. Josef Berger (1976). The Genetic Code and the Origin of Life. Acta Biotheoretica 25 (4).score: 336.0
    The problem of the origin of life understandably counts as one of the most exciting questions in the natural sciences, but in spite of almost endless speculation on this subject, it is still far from its final solution. The complexity of the functional correlation between recent nucleic acids and proteins can e.g. give rise to the assumption that the genetic code (and life) could not originate on the Earth. It was Portelli (1975) who published the hypothesis that the (...) code could not originate during the history of the Earth. In his opinion the recent genetic code represents the informational message transmitted by living systems of the previous cycle of the Universe. Here however, we defend the existence of a certain strategy in the syntheses of the genetic code during the history of the Earth. The strategy of correlation between amino acid and nucleotide polymers made an increasing velocity of the chemical evolution possible, that is, it increased the velocity of formation of the genetic code. Thus, life with the recent genetic code could originate on the Earth within the present cycle of the Universe. (shrink)
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  38. Marcello Barbieri (2012). Code Biology – A New Science of Life. Biosemiotics 5 (3):411-437.score: 330.0
    Systems Biology and the Modern Synthesis are recent versions of two classical biological paradigms that are known as structuralism and functionalism, or internalism and externalism. According to functionalism (or externalism), living matter is a fundamentally passive entity that owes its organization to external forces (functions that shape organs) or to an external organizing agent (natural selection). Structuralism (or internalism), is the view that living matter is an intrinsically active entity that is capable of organizing itself from within, with purely (...)
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  39. Deena Emera, Roberto Romero & Günter Wagner (2012). The Evolution of Menstruation: A New Model for Genetic Assimilation. Bioessays 34 (1):26-35.score: 328.5
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  40. Chris Salzberg & Hiroki Sayama (2004). Complex Genetic Evolution of Artificial Self-Replicators in Cellular Automata. Complexity 10 (2):33-39.score: 328.5
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  41. Philippe Huneman (2013). Causal Parity and Externalisms: Extensions in Life and Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (3):377-404.score: 324.0
    This paper questions the form and prospects of “extended theories” which have been simultaneously and independently advocated both in the philosophy of mind and in the philosophy of biology. It focuses on Extend Mind Theory (EMT) and Developmental Systems Theory (DST). It shows first that the two theories vindicate a parallel extension of received views, the former concerning extending cognition beyond the brain, the latter concerned with extending evolution and development beyond the genes. It also shows that both (...)
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  42. Mark A. Bedau, Optimal Formulation of Complex Chemical Systems with a Genetic Algorithm.score: 324.0
    We demonstrate a method for optimizing desired functionality in real complex chemical systems, using a genetic algorithm. The chemical systems studied here are mixtures of amphiphiles, which spontaneously exhibit a complex variety of self-assembled molecular aggregations, and the property optimized is turbidity. We also experimentally resolve the fitness landscape in some hyper-planes through the space of possible amphiphile formulations, in order to assess the practicality of our optimization method. Our method shows clear and significant progress after testing (...)
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  43. Herbert F. Mataré (1999). Bioethics: The Ethics of Evolution and Genetic Interference. Bergin & Garvey.score: 315.0
    From a scientific approach, this work explores the moral implications of genetic engineering and argues for corrective genetic interference.
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  44. Claudia Lorena García (2010). Functional Homology and Functional Variation in Evolutionary Cognitive Science. Biological Theory 5 (2):124-135.score: 308.0
    Most cognitive scientists nowadays tend to think that at least some of the mind’s capacities are the product of biological evolution, yet important conceptual problems remain for all of them in order to be able to speak coherently of mental or cognitive systems as having evolved naturally. Two of these important problems concern the articulation of adequate, interesting and empirically useful concepts of homology and variation as applied to cognitive systems. However, systems in cognitive science are (...)
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  45. Maarten Boudry & Johan Braeckman (2012). How Convenient! The Epistemic Rationale of Self-Validating Belief Systems. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):341-364.score: 306.0
    This paper offers an epistemological discussion of self-validating belief systems and the recurrence of ?epistemic defense mechanisms? and ?immunizing strategies? across widely different domains of knowledge. We challenge the idea that typical ?weird? belief systems are inherently fragile, and we argue that, instead, they exhibit a surprising degree of resilience in the face of adverse evidence and criticism. Borrowing from the psychological research on belief perseverance, rationalization and motivated reasoning, we argue that the human mind is particularly susceptible (...)
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  46. Jean-Pierre Aubin (2003). Adaptive Evolution of Complex Systems Under Uncertain Environmental Constraints: A Viability Approach. In. In J. B. Nation (ed.), Formal Descriptions of Developing Systems. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 165--184.score: 303.8
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  47. P. Slurink, Culture and the Evolution of the Human Mating System.score: 300.0
    Contrary to chimpanzees and bonobos, humans display long-term exclusive relationships between males and females. Probably all human cultures have some kind of marriage system, apparently designed to protect these exclusive relationships and the resulting offspring in a potentially sexual competitive environment. Different hypotheses about the origin of human pair-bonds are compared and it is shown how they may refer to different phases of human evolution.
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  48. Jonathan Bard (2010). A Systems Biology View of Evolutionary Genetics. Bioessays 32 (7):559-563.score: 300.0
  49. Jon Mallatt Todd E. Feinberg (2013). The Evolutionary and Genetic Origins of Consciousness in the Cambrian Period Over 500 Million Years Ago. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 300.0
    Vertebrates evolved in the Cambrian Period before 520 million years ago, but we do not know when or how consciousness arose in the history of the vertebrate brain. Here we propose multiple levels of isomorphic or somatotopic neural representations as an objective marker for sensory consciousness. All extant vertebrates have these, so we deduce that consciousness extends back to the group’s origin. The first conscious sense may have been vision. Then vision, coupled with additional sensory systems derived from ectodermal (...)
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  50. Robert B. Eckhardt (2006). The Evolution of Language: Present Behavioral Evidence for Past Genetic Reprogramming in the Human Lineage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):284-285.score: 297.0
    Language and life history can be related functionally through the study of human ontogeny, thus usefully informing our understanding of several unique aspects of the evolution of species. The operational principles outlined by Locke & Bogin (L&B) demonstrate that the present can provide a useful framework for understanding the past.
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