Search results for 'Evolution of mind' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Evelyn Gick & Wolfgang Gick (2001). F.A. Hayek's Theory of Mind and Theory of Cultural Evolution Revisited: Toward and Integrated Perspective. [REVIEW] Mind and Society 2 (1):149-162.score: 531.0
    F.A. Hayek’s theory of cultural evolution has often been regarded as incompatible with his earlier works. Since it lacks an elaborated theory of individual learning, we try to back his arguments by starting with his thoughts on individual perception described in hisTheory of Mind. With a focus on the current discussion concerning biological and cultural selection theories, we argue hisTheory of Mind leads to two different stages of societal evolution with well-defined learning processes, respectively. The first (...)
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  2. Bertram F. Malle (2002). The Relation Between Language and Theory of Mind in Development and Evolution. In Malle, Bertram F. (2002) the Relation Between Language and Theory of Mind in Development and Evolution. [Book Chapter].score: 435.0
    Considering the close relation between language and theory of mind in development and their tight connection in social behavior, it is no big leap to claim that the two capacities have been related in evolution as well. But what is the exact relation between them? This paper attempts to clear a path toward an answer. I consider several possible relations between the two faculties, bring conceptual arguments and empirical evidence to bear on them, and end up arguing for (...)
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  3. B. I. B. Lindahl (2001). Consciousness, Behavioural Patterns and the Direction of Biological Evolution: Implications for the Mind-Brain Problem. In Paavo Pylkkanen & Tere Vaden (eds.), Dimensions of Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. 73-99.score: 426.0
  4. Merlin Donald (2001). A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness. W.W. Norton.score: 423.0
  5. Charles Augustus Strong (1918/1983). The Origin of Consciousness: An Attempt to Conceive the Mind as a Product of Evolution. MacMillan and Co..score: 423.0
  6. C. M. Heyes (1998). Theory of Mind in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):101-114.score: 387.0
    Since the BBS article in which Premack and Woodruff (1978) asked “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?,” it has been repeatedly claimed that there is observational and experimental evidence that apes have mental state concepts, such as “want” and “know.” Unlike research on the development of theory of mind in childhood, however, no substantial progress has been made through this work with nonhuman primates. A survey of empirical studies of imitation, self-recognition, social relationships, deception, role-taking, and (...)
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  7. Piers J. Hale (2013). Monkeys Into Men and Men Into Monkeys: Chance and Contingency in the Evolution of Man, Mind and Morals in Charles Kingsley's Water Babies. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):551-597.score: 384.0
    The nineteenth century theologian, author and poet Charles Kingsley was a notable populariser of Darwinian evolution. He championed Darwin’s cause and that of honesty in science for more than a decade from 1859 to 1871. Kingsley’s interpretation of evolution shaped his theology, his politics and his views on race. The relationship between men and apes set the context for Kingsley’s consideration of these issues. Having defended Darwin for a decade in 1871 Kingsley was dismayed to read Darwin’s account (...)
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  8. Zann Gill (2013). The Other Edge of Ockham's Razor: The A-PR Hypothesis and the Origin of Mind. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):403-419.score: 381.0
    Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution characterized all life as engaged in a “struggle for existence”. To struggle requires internal data processing to detect and interpret patterns to guide behavior, a mechanism to struggle for existence. The cognitive bootstrapping A-PR cycle (Autonomy | Pattern Recognition) couples the origin of life and mind, enabling their symbiotic co-evolution. Life processes energy to create order. Mind processes data to create meaning. Life and mind co-evolve toward increased functional effectiveness, using (...)
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  9. K. R. Popper, B. I. B. Lindahl & P. Århem (1993). A Discussion of the Mind-Brain Problem. Theoretical Medicine 14 (2):167-180.score: 378.0
    In this paper Popper formulates and discusses a new aspect of the theory of mind. This theory is partly based on his earlier developed interactionistic theory. It takes as its point of departure the observation that mind and physical forces have several properties in common, at least the following six: both are (i) located, (ii) unextended, (iii) incorporeal, (iv) capable of acting on bodies, (v) dependent upon body, (vi) capable of being influenced by bodies. Other properties such as (...)
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  10. Alejandro Rosas (2004). Mind Reading, Deception and the Evolution of Kantian Moral Agents. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (2):127–139.score: 375.0
    Classical evolutionary explanations of social behavior classify behaviors from their effects, not from their underlying mechanisms. Here lies a potential objection against the view that morality can be explained by such models, e.g. Trivers’reciprocal altruism. However, evolutionary theory reveals a growing interest in the evolution of psychological mechanisms and factors them in as selective forces. This opens up perspectives for evolutionary approaches to problems that have traditionally worried moral philosophers. Once the ability to mind-read is factored-in among the (...)
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  11. Helena Knyazeva (2011). The Cognitive Architecture of Embodied Mind. International Journal of the Humanities 8 (12):1-10.score: 366.0
    The dynamic approach to understanding of the human consciousness, its cognitive activities and cognitive architecture is one of the most promising approaches in the modern epistemology and cognitive science. The conception of embodied mind is under discussion in the light of nonlinear dynamics and of the idea co-evolution of complex systems developed by the Moscow scientific school. The cognitive architecture of the embodied mind is rather complex: data from senses and products of rational thinking, the verbal and (...)
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  12. James Hopkins (2000). Evolution, Consciousness, and the Internality of the Mind. In Peter Carruthers & A. Chamberlain (eds.), Evolution and the Human Mind. Cambridge University Press. 276.score: 366.0
    The problem of consciousness seems to arise from experience itself. As we shall consider in more detail below, we are strongly disposed to contrast conscious experience with the physical states or events by which we take it to be realized. This contrast gives rise to dualism and other problems of mind and body. In this chapter I argue that these problems can usefully be considered in the perspective of evolution.
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  13. Merlin Donald (1993). Précis of Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):737-748.score: 366.0
    This bold and brilliant book asks the ultimate question of the life sciences: How did the human mind acquire its incomparable power? In seeking the answer, Merlin Donald traces the evolution of human culture and cognition from primitive apes to the era of artificial intelligence, and presents an original theory of how the human mind evolved from its presymbolic form. In the emergence of modern human culture, Donald proposes, there were three radical transitions. During the first, our (...)
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  14. Denise Dellarosa Cummins (2000). How the Social Environment Shaped the Evolution of Mind. Synthese 122 (1-2):3 - 28.score: 357.0
    Dominance hierarchies are ubiquitous in the societies of human and non-human animals. Evidence from comparative, developmental, and cognitive psychological investigations is presented that show how social dominance hierarchies shaped the evolution of the human mind, and hence, human social institutions. It is argued that the pressures that arise from living in hierarchical social groups laid a foundation of fundamental concepts and cognitive strategies that are crucial to surviving in social dominance hierarchies. These include recognizing and reasoning transitively about (...)
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  15. Diana Y. Paul (1984). Philosophy of Mind in Sixth-Century China: Paramārtha's "Evolution of Consciousness". Stanford University Press.score: 348.0
    Of the many translators who carried the Buddhist doctrine to China, Paramartha, a missionary-monk who arrived in China in AD 546, ranks as the translator par excellence of the sixth century. Introducing philosophical ideas that would subsequently excite the Chinese imagination to develop the great schools of Sui and T'ang Buddhism, Paramartha's translations are almost exclusively of Yogacara Buddhist texts on the nature of the mind and consciousness. This first study of Paramartha in a Western language focuses on the (...)
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  16. Gerald Gaus, The Evolution of Society and Mind: Hayek's System of Ideas.score: 348.0
    As a rule, Hayek has not been treated kindly by scholars. One would expect that a political theorist and economist of his stature would be charitably, if not sympathetically, read by commentators; instead, Hayek often elicits harsh dismissals. This is especially true of his fundamental ideas about the evolution of society and reason. A reader will find influential discussions in which his analysis is described as “dogmatic,” “unsophisticated,” and “crude.” In this chapter I propose to take a fresh start, (...)
     
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  17. Vivian Bohl & Alan P. Fiske (2014-02). In and Out of Each Other's Bodies: Theory of Mind, Evolution, Truth, and the Nature of the Social. Maurice Bloch. Boulder, CO: Paradigm, 2012. 161 Pp. [REVIEW] American Ethnologist 41 (1):214-215.score: 345.0
  18. W. Tecumseh Fitch (2005). The Evolution of Language: A Comparative Review. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):193-203.score: 342.0
    For many years the evolution of language has been seen as a disreputable topic, mired in fanciful “just so stories” about language origins. However, in the last decade a new synthesis of modern linguistics, cognitive neuroscience and neo-Darwinian evolutionary theory has begun to make important contributions to our understanding of the biology and evolution of language. I review some of this recent progress, focusing on the value of the comparative method, which uses data from animal species to draw (...)
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  19. Mark Germine (2008). The Holographic Principle of Mind and the Evolution of Consciousness. World Futures 64 (3):151 – 178.score: 342.0
    The Holographic Principle holds that the information in any region of space and time exists on the surface of that region. Layers of the holographic, universal “now” go from the inception of the universe to the present. Universal Consciousness is the timeless source of actuality and mentality. Information is experience, and the expansion of the “now” leads to higher and higher orders of experience in the Universe, with various levels of consciousness emerging from experience. The brain consists of a nested (...)
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  20. Joëlle Proust (2006). Why Evolution Has to Matter to Cognitive Psychology and to Philosophy of Mind. Biological Theory 1 (4):346-348.score: 342.0
    Growing suspicions were raised however that an exclusively language-oriented view of the mind, focussing on the characterization of anhistorical, static mental states through their propositional contents, was hardly compatible with what is currently known of brain architecture and did not fare well when confronted with results from many behavioral studies of mental functions. My aim in what follows is to show that these forms of dissatisfaction stem from the fact that brain evolution and development were either entirely ignored, (...)
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  21. N. Humphrey (2003). The Mind Made Flesh: Essays From the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution. Oxford University Press.score: 330.0
    Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology.
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  22. Anthony O'Hear (1997). Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation. Oxford University Press.score: 318.0
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines the nature (...)
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  23. Terry Blumenthal & James Schirillo (1999). Biological Neuroscience is Only as Radical as the Evolution of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):831-831.score: 312.0
    A biological neuroscientific theory must acknowledge that the function of a neurological system is to produce behaviors that promote survival. Thus, unlike what Gold & Stoljar claim, function and behavior are the province of neurobiology and cannot be relegated to the field of psychological phenomena, which would then trivialize the radical doctrine if accepted. One possible advantage of adopting such a (correctly revised) radical doctrine is that it might ultimately produce a successful, evolutionarily based, theory of mind.
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  24. K. Peter (1996). 20 Language and the Evolution of Mind-Reading. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 344.score: 312.0
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  25. E. C. G. Sudarshan (1983). Evolution of Mind: Projections Into the Future. In Kishor Gandhi (ed.), The Evolution of Consciousness. Paragon House. 83--108.score: 312.0
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  26. Jim Hopkins (2000). Evolution, Consciousness, and the Internality of Mind. In P. Carruthers & A. Chamberlen (eds.), Evolution and the Human Mind. Cambridge University Press. 276.score: 306.0
    Understanding the notion of innerness that we ascribe to mental items is central to understanding the problem of consciousness, and we can do so in evolutionary and physical terms.
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  27. Osmo Kivinen & Tero Piiroinen (2011). On the Distinctively Human: Two Perspectives on the Evolution of Language and Conscious Mind. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):87-105.score: 306.0
    In this paper, two alternative naturalistic standpoints on the relations between language, human consciousness and social life are contrasted. The first, dubbed “intrinsic naturalism,” is advocated among others by the realist philosopher John Searle; it starts with intrinsic intentionality and consciousness emerging from the brain, explains language as an outgrowth of consciousness and ends with institutional reality being created by language-use. That standpoint leans on what may be described as the standard interpretation of Darwinian evolution. The other type of (...)
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  28. Aku Visala (2014). Imago Dei, Dualism, and Evolution: A Philosophical Defense of the Structural Image of God. Zygon 49 (1):101-120.score: 306.0
    Most contemporary theologians have distanced themselves from views that identify the image of God with a capacity or a set of capacities that humans have. This article examines three arguments against the structural view and finds them wanting. The first argument is that the structural view entails mind/body dualism and dualism is no longer viable given neuroscience and contemporary philosophy. Against this, I argue that contemporary forms of dualism are able to circumvent such worries and are at least prima (...)
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  29. Bruce Bridgeman (2008). The Role of Motor-Sensory Feedback in the Evolution of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):132-133.score: 306.0
    Seemingly small changes in brain organization can have revolutionary consequences for function. An example is evolution's application of the primate action-planning mechanism to the management of communicative sequences. When feedback from utterances reaches the brain again through a mechanism that evolved to monitor action sequences, it makes another pass through the brain, amplifying the human power of thinking.
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  30. Michael C. Corballis (2002). Evolution of the Generative Mind. In Robert J. Sternberg & J. Kaufman (eds.), The Evolution of Intelligence. Lawrence Erlbaum. 117--144.score: 303.0
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  31. Raymond A. Noack (2007). The Frontal Feedback Model of the Evolution of the Human Mind: Part 2, the Human Brain and the Frontal Feedback System. Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (3):233.score: 303.0
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  32. Raymond A. Noack (2006). The Frontal Feedback Model of the Evolution of the Human Mind: Part 1, the" Pre"-Human Brain and the Perception-Action Cycle. Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (3):247.score: 303.0
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  33. Robert Arp (2013). The Evolution of Scenario Visualization and the Early Hominin Mind. In. In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. 143--159.score: 303.0
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  34. D. F. Bjorklund & K. Kipp (2002). Social Cognition, Inhibition, and Theory of Mind: The Evolution of Human Intelligence. In Robert J. Sternberg & J. Kaufman (eds.), The Evolution of Intelligence. Lawrence Erlbaum. 27--54.score: 303.0
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  35. Larry Vandervert (1996). The Fractal Maximum-Power Evolution of Brain, Consciousness, and Mind. In E. MacCormac & Maxim I. Stamenov (eds.), Fractals of Brain, Fractals of Mind: In Search of a Symmetry Bond. John Benjamins. 7--235.score: 303.0
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  36. Bertram F. Malle (2005). Folk Theory of Mind: Conceptual Foundations of Human Social Cognition. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 225-255.score: 297.0
    The human ability to represent, conceptualize, and reason about mind and behavior is one of the greatest achievements of human evolution and is made possible by a “folk theory of mind” — a sophisticated conceptual framework that relates different mental states to each other and connects them to behavior. This chapter examines the nature and elements of this framework and its central functions for social cognition. As a conceptual framework, the folk theory of mind operates prior (...)
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  37. Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.) (2010). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press.score: 297.0
    This collection opens a dialogue between process philosophy and contemporary consciousness studies. Approaching consciousness from diverse disciplinary perspectives—philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, neuropathology, psychotherapy, biology, animal ethology, and physics—the contributors offer empirical and philosophical support for a model of consciousness inspired by the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead (1861–1947). Whitehead’s model is developed in ways he could not have anticipated to show how it can advance current debates beyond well-known sticking points. This has trenchant consequences for epistemology and suggests fresh and (...)
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  38. Thomas Wynn (2000). Symmetry and the Evolution of the Modular Linguistic Mind. In Peter Carruthers & A. Chamberlain (eds.), Evolution and the Human Mind. Cambridge University Press. 113--39.score: 297.0
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  39. Tanya de Villiers-Botha (2011). Peculiarities in Mind ; or, on the Absence of Darwin. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):282-302.score: 291.0
    A key failing in contemporary philosophy of mind is the lack of attention paid to evolutionary theory in its research projects. Notably, where evolution is incorporated into the study of mind, the work being done is often described as philosophy of cognitive science rather than philosophy of mind. Even then, whereas possible implications of the evolution of human cognition are taken more seriously within the cognitive sciences and the philosophy of cognitive science, its relevance for (...)
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  40. Philippe Huneman (2013). Causal Parity and Externalisms: Extensions in Life and Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (3):377-404.score: 291.0
    This paper questions the form and prospects of “extended theories” which have been simultaneously and independently advocated both in the philosophy of mind and in the philosophy of biology. It focuses on Extend Mind Theory (EMT) and Developmental Systems Theory (DST). It shows first that the two theories vindicate a parallel extension of received views, the former concerning extending cognition beyond the brain, the latter concerned with extending evolution and development beyond the genes. It also shows that (...)
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  41. De Villiers-Botha (2011). Peculiarities in Mind; or, on the Absence of Darwin. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):282-302.score: 291.0
    A key failing in contemporary philosophy of mind is the lack of attention paid to evolutionary theory in its research projects. Notably, where evolution is incorporated into the study of mind, the work being done is often described as philosophy of cognitive science rather than philosophy of mind. Even then, whereas possible implications of the evolution of human cognition are taken more seriously within the cognitive sciences and the philosophy of cognitive science, its relevance for (...)
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  42. Kenneth M. Sayre (1976). Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 291.0
    This book, published in 1976, presents an entirely original approach to the subject of the mind-body problem, examining it in terms of the conceptual links between the physical sciences and the sciences of human behaviour. It is based on the cybernetic concepts of information and feedback and on the related concepts of thermodynamic and communication-theoretic entropy. The foundation of the approach is the theme of continuity between evolution, learning and human consciousness. The author defines life as a process (...)
     
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  43. Owen J. Flanagan (2000). Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 279.0
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature (...)
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  44. Michael Anderson, Evolution, Embodiment and the Nature of the Mind.score: 279.0
    In: B. Hardy-Vallee & N. Payette, eds. Beyond the brain: embodied, situated & distributed cognition. (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholar’s Press), in press. Abstract: In this article, I do three main things: 1. First, I introduce an approach to the mind motivated primarily by evolutionary considerations. I do that by laying out four principles for the study of the mind from an evolutionary perspective, and four predictions that they suggest. This evolutionary perspective is completely compatible with, although broader than, the (...)
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  45. Ray Jackendoff (2003). Précis of Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution,. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):651-665.score: 279.0
    The goal of this study is to reintegrate the theory of generative grammar into the cognitive sciences. Generative grammar was right to focus on the child's acquisition of language as its central problem, leading to the hypothesis of an innate Universal Grammar. However, generative grammar was mistaken in assuming that the syntactic component is the sole course of combinatoriality, and that everything else is “interpretive.” The proper approach is a parallel architecture, in which phonology, syntax, and semantics are autonomous generative (...)
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  46. Liam P. Dempsey (2009). Thinking-Matter Then and Now: The Evolution of Mind-Body Dualism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (1):43 - 61.score: 279.0
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  47. John Tooby (1996). The Evolution of Mind. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 18--48.score: 279.0
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  48. John Tooby Colin Allen (1996). The Evolution of Mind. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 48.score: 279.0
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  49. Harry J. Jerison (1985). On the Evolution of Mind. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Brain and Mind. Methuen. 1--31.score: 279.0
     
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  50. K. Talmont-Kaminski M. Milkowski (ed.) (2013). Regarding the Mind, Naturally: Naturalist Approaches to the Sciences of the Mental. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.score: 279.0
    Naturalism is currently the most vibrantly developing approach to philosophy, with naturalised methodologies being applied across all the philosophical disciplines. One of the areas naturalism has been focussing upon is the mind, traditionally viewed as a topic hard to reconcile with the naturalistic worldview. A number of questions have been pursued in this context. What is the place of the mind in the world? How should we study the mind as a natural phenomenon? What is the significance (...)
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