Search results for 'Exam technique' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elizabeth Burns & Michael Lacewing (2004). Essay Writing and Exam Preparation. In Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.), Philosophy for as and A. Routledge.score: 78.0
  2. Earl W. Spurgin (2004). The Goals and Merits of a Business Ethics Competency Exam. Journal of Business Ethics 50 (3):279-288.score: 18.0
    My university recently established a business ethics competency exam for graduate business students. The exam is designed to test whether students can demonstrate several abilities that are indicative of competency in business ethics. They are the abilities to speak the language of business ethics, identify business ethics issues, apply theories and concepts to issues, identify connections among theories and concepts as they relate to different issues, and construct and critically evaluate arguments for various positions on business ethics issues. (...)
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  3. Annelies De Schrijver (2012). Sample Survey on Sensitive Topics: Investigating Respondents' Understanding and Trust in Alternative Versions of the Randomized Response Technique. Journal of Research Practice 8 (1):Article - M1.score: 18.0
    In social science research, survey respondents hesitate to answer sensitive questions. This explains why traditional self-report surveys often suffer from high levels of non-response and dishonest answers. To overcome these problems, an adjusted questioning technique is necessary. This article examines one such adjusted questioning technique: the randomized response technique. However, in order to obtain reliable and valid data, respondents need to understand and trust this technique. Respondents' understanding and trust are assessed in two online variants of (...)
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  4. Lambert Dousson (2010). La vedette et le dictateur : sur une note de bas de page de L'Œuvre d'art à l'époque de sa reproductibilité technique de Walter Benjamin. Astérion 7.score: 18.0
    La genèse de la vedette de cinéma qu’effectue Walter Benjamin au chapitre 10 de L’Œuvre d’art à l’époque de sa reproductibilité technique (dernière version, 1939) trouve une résonance politique dans une note de bas de page du même chapitre où la star acquiert un statut analogue au dictateur, quand la technique (de reproduction) de l’œuvre d’art devient elle-même, à travers le cinéma, œuvre d’art. Si les démocraties bourgeoises contiennent, dans leur rapport aux médias de masse, la possibilité de (...)
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  5. Chihaya Kusayanagi (2013). Constructing and Understanding an Incident as a Social Problem: A Case Study of University Entrance Exam Cheating in Japan. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (1):133-148.score: 18.0
    The recent work of Frances Chaput Waksler—The New Orleans Sniper: A Phenomenological Case Study of Constituting the Other—demonstrates, by close examination of the case of the New Orleans Sniper of 1973, how people constitute and unconstitute an “Other” in certain situations. This paper explores the process by which people constituted the Other in Japan in February of 2011 through the course of an incident that surprised Japanese people: university entrance exam cheating by use of the Internet question-and-answer bulletin board. (...)
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  6. Liesbeth De Mol & Giuseppe Primiero (forthcoming). Facing Computing as Technique: Towards a History and Philosophy of Computing. Philosophy and Technology:1-6.score: 15.0
    We present the methodological principles underlying the scientific activities of the DHST Commission on the History and Philosophy of Computing. This volume collects refereed selected papers from the First International Conference organized by the Commission.
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  7. M. L. Phares (1934). Analysis of Musical Appreciation by Means of the Psychogalvanic Reflex Technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (1):119.score: 15.0
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  8. Claude E. Buxton & Hugh V. Ross (1949). Relationship Between Reminiscence and Type of Learning Technique in Serial Anticipation Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (1):41.score: 15.0
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  9. Andrea Hämmerlein, Uta Müller & Martin Schulz (2011). Pharmacist‐Led Intervention Study to Improve Inhalation Technique in Asthma and COPD Patients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (1):61-70.score: 15.0
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  10. W. N. Kellogg, R. C. Davis & V. B. Scott (1939). Refinements in Technique for the Conditioning of Motor Reflexes in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (3):318.score: 15.0
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  11. Lloyd R. Peterson, Charles L. Brewer & Richard Bertucco (1963). A Guessing Strategy with the Anticipation Technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (3):258.score: 15.0
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  12. Marylin C. Smith & Susan Ramunas (1971). Elimination of Visual Field Effects by Use of a Single Report Technique: Evidence for Order-of-Report Artifact. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):23.score: 15.0
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  13. Charles E. Sternheim & Robert M. Boynton (1966). Uniqueness of Perceived Hues Investigated with a Continuous Judgmental Technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (5):770.score: 15.0
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  14. Herbert Woodrow & Benjamin Karpman (1917). A New Olfactometric Technique and Some Results. Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (6):431-447.score: 15.0
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  15. J. W. Gardner (1937). An Experimental Study of the Luria Technique for Detecting Mental Conflict. Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (5):495.score: 15.0
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  16. J. S. Gottlieb & O. D. Fowler (1941). A Note on Chronaxic Technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (4):367.score: 15.0
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  17. Alain Gras (2011). L'évaluation du fait technique, une métaphysique pour l'hypersauvage contemporain. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 1 (1):285-297.score: 15.0
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  18. Xavier Guchet (2003). Pensée technique et philosophie transcendantale. Archives de Philosophie 1:119-144.score: 15.0
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  19. Robert E. Miller & John V. Murphy (1958). Supplementary Report: The Diminishing Interval Conditioning Technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (5):456.score: 15.0
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  20. John G. Miscik, Jerald M. Smith, Norman H. Hamm, Kenneth A. Deffenbacher & Evan L. Brown (1972). Short-Term Retention of Auditory Sequences as a Function of Stimulus Duration, Intersimulus Interval, and Encoding Technique. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):147.score: 15.0
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  21. David Roden, In and Out of Control: Self-Augmenting and Autonomous Technique.score: 12.0
    Martin Heidegger and Jacques Ellul propounded substantivist accounts of technology which rejected the received instrumentalist view of technology according to which only the ends to which technologies are applied can be evaluated. In opposition to instrumentalism, they claimed that modern technology involves a displacement of non-technological values or (in Heidegger’s case) other ways of relating to Being. The theory of technical autonomy that Jacques Ellul sets out in The Technological Society is distinguished from Heidegger’s brand of substantivism, however, in providing (...)
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  22. Ken Levy (2009). The Solution to the Surprise Exam Paradox. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):131-158.score: 12.0
    The Surprise Exam Paradox continues to perplex and torment despite the many solutions that have been offered. This paper proposes to end the intrigue once and for all by refuting one of the central pillars of the Surprise Exam Paradox, the 'No Friday Argument,' which concludes that an exam given on the last day of the testing period cannot be a surprise. This refutation consists of three arguments, all of which are borrowed from the literature: the 'Unprojectible (...)
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  23. Gregory Gandenberger (2010). Producing a Robust Body of Data with a Single Technique. Philosophy of Science 77 (3):381-399.score: 12.0
    When a technique purports to provide information that is not available to the unaided senses, it is natural to think that the only way to validate that technique is by appealing to a theory of the processes that lead from the object of study to the raw data. In fact, scientists have a variety of strategies for validating their techniques. Those strategies can yield multiple independent arguments that support the validity of the technique. Thus, it is possible (...)
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  24. Michael Lacewing (2009). Philosophy for A2: Unit 4. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Philosophy for AS is the definitive textbook for students of the current AQA Advanced Subsidiary Level. Structured closely around the examination specifications, it covers the two units of the AS Level in an exceptionally clear and student-friendly style. As an invitation to philosophy, the book encourages and enables students to engage philosophically with the following syllabus topics: reason and experience Why should I be governed? Why should I be moral? the idea of God persons knowledge of the external world tolerance (...)
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  25. Elliott Sober (1998). To Give a Surprise Exam, Use Game Theory. Synthese 115 (3):355-373.score: 12.0
    This paper proposes a game-theoretic solution of the surprise examination problem. It is argued that the game of “matching pennies” provides a useful model for the interaction of a teacher who wants her exam to be surprising and students who want to avoid being surprised. A distinction is drawn between prudential and evidential versions of the problem. In both, the teacher should not assign a probability of zero to giving the exam on the last day. This representation of (...)
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  26. Jonathan Lear, Technique and Final Cause in Psychoanalysis: Four Ways of Looking at One Moment.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that if one considers just a single clinical moment there may be no principled way to choose among different approaches to psychoanalytic technique. One must in addition take into account what Aristotle called the final cause of psychoanalysis, which this paper argues is freedom. However, freedom is itself an open-ended concept with many aspects that need to be explored and developed from a psychoanalytic perspective. This paper considers one analytic moment from the perspectives of the techniques (...)
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  27. Ned Hall (1999). How to Set a Surprise Exam. Mind 108 (432):647-703.score: 12.0
    The professor announces a surprise exam for the upcoming week; her clever student purports to demonstrate by reductio that she cannot possibly give such an exam. Diagnosing his puzzling argument reveals a deeper puzzle: Is the student justified in believing the announcement? It would seem so, particularly if the upcoming 'week' is long enough. On the other hand, a plausible principle states that if, at the outset, the student is justified in believing some proposition, then he is also (...)
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  28. Sylvia Culp (1995). Objectivity in Experimental Inquiry: Breaking Data-Technique Circles. Philosophy of Science 62 (3):438-458.score: 12.0
    I respond to H. M. Collins's claim (1985, 1990, 1993) that experimental inquiry cannot be objective because the only criterium experimentalists have for determining whether a technique is "working" is the production of "correct" (i.e., the expected) data. Collins claims that the "experimenters' regress," the name he gives to this data-technique circle, cannot be broken using the resources of experiment alone. I argue that the data-technique circle, can be broken even though any interpretation of the raw data (...)
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  29. S. A. J. Stuart (2013). The Union of Two Nervous Systems: Neurophenomenology, Enkinaesthesia, and the Alexander Technique. Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):314-323.score: 12.0
    Context: Neurophenomenology is a relatively new field, with scope for novel and informative approaches to empirical questions about what structural parallels there are between neural activity and phenomenal experience. Problem: The overall aim is to present a method for examining possible correlations of neurodynamic and phenodynamic structures within the structurally-coupled work of Alexander Technique practitioners with their pupils. Method: This paper includes the development of an enkinaesthetic explanatory framework, an overview of the salient aspects of the Alexander Technique, (...)
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  30. Brian K. Burton & Janet P. Near (1995). Estimating the Incidence of Wrongdoing and Whistle-Blowing: Results of a Study Using Randomized Response Technique. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (1):17 - 30.score: 12.0
    Student cheating and reporting of that cheating represents one form of organizational wrong-doing and subsequent whistle-blowing, in the context of an academic organization. Previous research has been hampered by a lack of information concerning the validity of survey responses estimating the incidence of organizational wrongdoing and whistle-blowing. An innovative method, the Randomized Response Technique (RRT), was used here to assess the validity of reported incidences of wrongdoing and whistle-blowing. Surprisingly, our findings show that estimates of these incidences did not (...)
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  31. Lorenza Mondada (2009). Video Recording Practices and the Reflexive Constitution of the Interactional Order: Some Systematic Uses of the Split-Screen Technique. Human Studies 32 (1):67 - 99.score: 12.0
    In this paper, I deal with video data not as a transparent window on social interaction but as a situated product of video practices. This perspective invites an analysis of the practices of video-making, considering them as having a configuring impact on both on the way in which social interaction is documented and the way in which it is locally interpreted by video-makers. These situated interpretations and online analyses reflexively shape not only the record they produce but also the interactional (...)
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  32. John Williams (manuscript). The Surprise Exam Paradox: Disentangling Two Reductios. :67-94.score: 12.0
    One tradition of solving the surprise exam paradox, started by Robert Binkley and continued by Doris Olin, Roy Sorensen and Jelle Gerbrandy, construes surpriseepistemically and relies upon the oddity of propositions akin to G. E. Moore’s paradoxical ‘p and I don’t believe that p.’ Here I argue for an analysis that evolves from Olin’s. My analysis is different from hers or indeed any of those in the tradition because it explicitly recognizes that there are two distinct reductios at work (...)
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  33. Ryan Walter (2011). Hobbes, Liberalism, and Political Technique. The European Legacy 16 (1):53-69.score: 12.0
    Hobbes is commonly treated as a foundational figure for liberalism. This familiar view relies on emphasizing his account of the relationship between rights bearing individuals and state power. By contrast, this essay centers the practical question of how to govern, and develops this perspective to both question Hobbes's supposed liberalism and to demonstrate the utility of construing liberalism as more than a set of philosophical arguments regarding subject-state relations. In particular, understanding liberalism in terms of political technique offers a (...)
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  34. John N. Williams (2007). The Surprise Exam Paradox. Journal of Philosophical Research 32:67-94.score: 12.0
    One tradition of solving the surprise exam paradox, started by Robert Binkley and continued by Doris Olin, Roy Sorensen and Jelle Gerbrandy, construes surpriseepistemically and relies upon the oddity of propositions akin to G. E. Moore’s paradoxical ‘p and I don’t believe that p.’ Here I argue for an analysis that evolves from Olin’s. My analysis is different from hers or indeed any of those in the tradition because it explicitly recognizes that there are two distinct reductios at work (...)
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  35. Mohammad Ardeshir & Rasoul Ramezanian (2012). A Solution to the Surprise Exam Paradox in Constructive Mathematics. Review of Symbolic Logic 5 (4):679-686.score: 12.0
    We represent the well-known surprise exam paradox in constructive and computable mathematics and offer solutions. One solution is based on Brouwer’s continuity principle in constructive mathematics, and the other involves type 2 Turing computability in classical mathematics. We also discuss the backward induction paradox for extensive form games in constructive logic.
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  36. Don Fawkes, Tom Adajian & Steven Hoeltzel (2001). Examining the Exam. Inquiry 20 (4):19-33.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the content of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal exam (1980). Our report is not a statistical review. We find the content of this exam defective in a number of areas. The exam consists of five “tests” of 16 questions for a total of 80 questions. Of these, we cannot recommend test 1, test 2, test 4, and test 5; and, we cannot recommend questions 4, 5, 14, 16, 37, 45, 60, 63, 64, 65, 66, (...)
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  37. José Luis Ferreira & Jesús Zamora Bonilla (2008). The Surprise Exam Paradox, Rationality, and Pragmatics: A Simple Game‐Theoretic Analysis. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (3):285-299.score: 12.0
    The surprise exam paradox has attracted the attention of prominent logicians, mathematicians and philosophers for decades. Although the paradox itself has been resolved at least since Quine (1953), some aspects of it are still being discussed. In this paper we propose, following Sober (1998), to translate the paradox into the language of game theory to clarify these aspects. Our main conclusions are that a much simpler game?theoretic analysis of the paradox is possible, which solves most of the puzzles (...)
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  38. David A. Robinson, Per Davidsson, Hennie van der Mescht & Philip Court (2007). How Entrepreneurs Deal with Ethical Challenges – an Application of the Business Ethics Synergy Star Technique. Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):411 - 423.score: 12.0
    Entrepreneurs typically live with the ever-present threat of business failure arising from limited financial resources and aggressive competition in the marketplace. Under these circumstances, conflicting priorities arise and the entrepreneur is thus faced with certain dilemmas. In seeking to resolve these, entrepreneurs must often rely on their own judgment to determine “what is right”. There is thus a need for a technique to assist them decide on a course of action when no precedent or obvious solution exists. This research (...)
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  39. Halimah Awang (2005). Applying a Data Duplication Technique in Linear Regression Analysis of Waiting Time to Pregnancy. Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (4):471-479.score: 12.0
    This analysis demonstrates the application of a data duplication technique in linear regression with censored observations of the waiting time to third pregnancy ending in two outcome types, using data from Malaysia. The linear model not only confirmed the results obtained by the Cox proportional hazards model, but also identified two additional significant factors. The method provides a useful alternative when Cox proportionality assumption of the hazards is violated.
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  40. Boris Basil Bogoslovsky (1928). The Technique of Controversy. New York, Harcourt, Brace and Company.score: 12.0
    THE TECHNIQUE OF CONTROVERSY CHAPTER I THE PUZZLE OF MODERN REASONING / did not find anything on earth which was wholly superior to change. — Descartes. ...
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  41. Tom Boland (2007). Critique as a Technique of Self: A Butlerian Analysis of Judith Butler's Prefaces. History of the Human Sciences 20 (3):105-122.score: 12.0
    This article considers `critique' as performative, being on the one hand a reiterative performance, that enacts the `critic' through the act of critique, and on the other hand reflecting the constitution of the subject. While this approach takes on the conceptual framework of Judith Butler's work, it differs by refusing critique — or its correlates; parody, subversion or similar — any special status. Like any other performance critique is taken here as a cultural practice, as a Foucauldian `technique of (...)
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  42. Matthew Elton (1997). Cognitive Success and Exam Preparation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):72-73.score: 12.0
    Evolution is not like an exam in which pre-set problems need to be solved. Failing to recognise this point, Clark & Thornton misconstrue the type of explanation called for in species learning although, clearly, species that can trade spaces have more chances to discover novel beneficial behaviours. On the other hand, the trading spaces strategy might help to explain lifetime learning successes.
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  43. Istvan Rev (1990). Uncertainty as a Technique of the Exercise of Power: An Approach to the Question of Transition. World Futures 29 (1):47-67.score: 12.0
    (1990). Uncertainty as a Technique of the Exercise of Power: An Approach to the Question of Transition. World Futures: Vol. 29, Transition in Eastern Europe, pp. 47-67.
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  44. Margarita Vázquez (2008). Logic and the Surprise Exam Paradox. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 13:121-127.score: 12.0
    In this paper, I analyze the "surprise exam paradox". I think that the paradox can be avoided and I am going to focus on three points: 1) A conflict arises between reasoning and the confidence in the person that makes the original statement. If we examine the situation by reasoning we conclude that the statement is not going to come true, because we trust the person that states it. However, if it is not possible to happen, it happens, and (...)
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  45. Alberto Cambrosio & Peter Keating (1992). Between Fact and Technique: The Beginnings of Hybridoma Technology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 25 (2):175 - 230.score: 12.0
    At several places in this paper we have made use of a well-known rhetorical device: an argument was made; a character —dubbed “fictional reader” — was then evoked who voiced some objections against that particular argument; and finally, we answered those objections, thus bringing to a close, at least temporarily, our argument. The use of this device raises a question: “How is the presence of the ‘fictional reader” to be understood?” Is it a “mere” rhetorical tool, or does this character (...)
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  46. E. Cannabrava (1963). Coercion and Cooperation: What Are the Measures of Social Coercion Necessary to Safeguard the Technique of Effective Cooperation? World Futures 2 (sup001):60-64.score: 12.0
    (1963). Coercion and cooperation: What are the measures of social coercion necessary to safeguard the technique of effective cooperation? World Futures: Vol. 2, No. sup001, pp. 60-64.
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  47. Mihai Curelaru, Adrian Neculau & Mioara Cristea (2012). What People Think About Cloning? Social Representation of This Technique and its Associated Emotions. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):3-30.score: 12.0
    This study explores the social representations of cloning taking in consideration a series of associated emotions and the subjects' level of religiosity. The participants in our study consisted of 356 subjects of different ages and professions. The data collection included four tasks for the subjects to fill in. First, they had to fill in a free task association: starting from the stimulus-word „cloning" they had to associate five words or expressions, and then rank these five words according to their importance. (...)
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  48. Emmanuelle Danblon (2009). Dissuasion as a Rhetorical Technique of Creating a General Disposition to Inaction. Argumentation 23 (1):1-9.score: 12.0
    In this paper, it is argued that the classical rhetorical framework undergoes a transformation because of an important change in Western thought. Following this hypothesis, I analyze a rhetorical notion of “dissuasion” as a rhetorical technique of creating a “general disposition to inaction” in addition to a classical rhetorical notion of “dissuasion” that aims at “refraining from an action”.
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  49. Yukio Iwakuma (1987). Instantiae: An Introduction to a Twelfth Century Technique of Argumentation. [REVIEW] Argumentation 1 (4):437-453.score: 12.0
    An instantia is a technique to refute other's arguments, found in many tracts from the latter half of the twelfth century. An instantia has (or appears to have) the same form as the argument to be refuted and its falsity is more evident than that of the argument.Precursors of instantiae are among the teachings of masters active in the first half of the century. These masters produce counter-arguments against various inferential forms in order to examine their validity. But the (...)
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  50. Douglas Bridges & Luminiţa Vîţă (2003). A Proof-Technique in Uniform Space Theory. Journal of Symbolic Logic 68 (3):795-802.score: 12.0
    In the constructive theory of uniform spaces there occurs a technique of proof in which the application of a weak form of the law of excluded middle is circumvented by purely analytic means. The essence of this proof-technique is extracted and then applied in several different situations.
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