Search results for 'Expectations' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elin Palm (2009). Privacy Expectations at Work—What is Reasonable and Why? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):201 - 215.score: 24.0
    Throughout the longstanding debate on privacy, the concept has been framed in various ways. Most often it has been discussed as an area within which individuals rightfully may expect to be left alone and in terms of certain data that they should be entitled to control. The sphere in which individuals should be granted freedom from intrusion has typically been equated with the indisputably private domestic sphere. Privacy claims in the semi-public area of work have not been sufficiently investigated. In (...)
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  2. Robert L. McArthur (2001). Reasonable Expectations of Privacy. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):123-128.score: 24.0
    Use of the concept of `areasonable person and his or her expectations'is widely found in legal reasoning. This legalconstruct is employed in the present article toexamine privacy questions associated withcontemporary information technology, especiallythe internet. In particular, reasonableexpectations of privacy while browsing theworld-wide-web and while sending and receivinge-mail are analyzed.
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  3. Federica Lucivero, Tsjalling Swierstra & Marianne Boenink (2011). Assessing Expectations: Towards a Toolbox for an Ethics of Emerging Technologies. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 5 (2):129-141.score: 24.0
    In recent years, several authors have argued that the desirability of novel technologies should be assessed early, when they are still emerging. Such an ethical assessment of emerging technologies is by definition focused on an elusive object. Usually promises, expectations, and visions of the technology are taken as a starting point. As Nordmann and Rip have pointed out in a recent article, however, ethicists should not take for granted the plausibility of such expectations and visions. In this paper, (...)
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  4. Barbara Tillmann (2012). Music and Language Perception: Expectations, Structural Integration, and Cognitive Sequencing. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):568-584.score: 24.0
    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, showing that music (...)
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  5. Joseph A. Petrick & Robert F. Scherer (2005). Management Educators' Expectations for Professional Ethics Development. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):301 - 314.score: 24.0
    Professional associations, like the Academy of Management, exist to foster and promote scholarship, exchange among faculty, and an environment conducive to member professional ethics development. However, this last purpose of such organizations has received the least amount of attention. Moreover, previous research has demonstrated that there are differences in perceived needs for professional ethics development between tenured and untenured faculty. In the current research 260 Academy of Management members were surveyed. The research identified differences between tenured and untenured management faculty (...)
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  6. Robert Magneson Chiles (2013). If They Come, We Will Build It: In Vitro Meat and the Discursive Struggle Over Future Agrofood Expectations. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):511-523.score: 24.0
    According to recent literature in the sociology of expectations, expectations about the future are “performative” in that they provide guidance for activities, attract attention, mobilize political and economic resources, coordinate between groups, link technical and social concerns, create visions, and enroll supporters. While this framework has blossomed over the past decade in science and technology studies, it has yet to be applied towards a more refined understanding of how the future of the modern agrofood system is being actively (...)
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  7. Hagen Lindstädt (2007). Valuing Others' Information Under Imperfect Expectations. Theory and Decision 62 (4):335-353.score: 24.0
    Sometimes we believe that others receive harmful information. However, Marschak’s value of information framework always assigns non-negative value under expected utility: it starts from the decision maker’s beliefs – and one can never anticipate information’s harmfulness for oneself. The impact of decision makers’ capabilities to process information and of their expectations remains hidden behind the individual and subjective perspective Marschak’s framework assumes. By introducing a second decision maker as a point of reference, this paper introduces a way for evaluating (...)
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  8. Birutė Pranevičienė & Kristina Mikalauskaitė-Šostakienė (2012). Guarantee of Principles of Legitimate Expectations, Legal Certainty and Legal Security in the Territorial Planning Process. Jurisprudence 19 (2):643-656.score: 24.0
    The article discusses the issue of realisation of the principles of legitimate expectations, legal certainty and legal security in the specific area of administrative activity – detailed territorial planning process. During this long and complex process, it is very important to ensure the protection of personal constitutional rights and guarantee the security of legitimate expectations, legal certainty and other essential principles. The article analyses the circumstances conditioning violation of the principles of legitimate expectations, legal security and legal (...)
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  9. Catherine J. Stevens, Julien Tardieu, Peter Dunbar-Hall, Catherine T. Best & Barbara Tillmann (2013). Expectations in Culturally Unfamiliar Music: Influences of Proximal and Distal Cues and Timbral Characteristics. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Listeners’ musical perception is influenced by cues that can be stored in short-term memory (e.g. within the same musical piece) or long-term memory (e.g. based on one’s own musical culture). The present study tested how these cues (referred to as respectively proximal and distal cues) influence the perception of music from an unfamiliar culture. Western listeners who were naïve to Gamelan music judged completeness and coherence for newly constructed melodies in the Balinese gamelan tradition. In these melodies, we manipulated the (...)
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  10. Maike Kemper, Valentin J. Umbach, Sabine Schwager, Robert Gaschler, Peter A. Frensch & Birgit Stürmer (2012). What I Say is What I Get: Stronger Effects of Self-Generated Vs. Cue-Induced Expectations in Event-Related Potentials. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Expectations regarding future events enable preparatory processes and allow for faster responses to expected stimuli compared to unexpected stimuli. Expectations can have internal sources or follow external cues. While many studies on expectation effects use some form of cueing, a direct comparison with self-generated expectations involving behavioral and psychophysiological measures is lacking. In the present study we compare cue-induced expectations with self-generated expectations that are both expressed verbally in a within-subjects design, measuring behavioral performance and (...)
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  11. Birgit Stürmer Maike Kemper, Valentin J. Umbach, Sabine Schwager, Robert Gaschler, Peter A. Frensch (2012). What I Say is What I Get: Stronger Effects of Self-Generated Vs. Cue-Induced Expectations in Event-Related Potentials. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Expectations regarding future events enable preparatory processes and allow for faster responses to expected stimuli compared to unexpected stimuli. Expectations can have internal sources or follow external cues. While many studies on expectation effects use some form of cueing, a direct comparison with self-generated expectations involving behavioral and psychophysiological measures is lacking. In the present study we compare cue-induced expectations with self-generated expectations that are both expressed verbally in a within-subjects design, measuring behavioral performance and (...)
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  12. Nell Adkins & Robin R. Radtke (2004). Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Importance of Business Ethics and Accounting Ethics Education: Is There an Expectations Gap? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (3):279-300.score: 21.0
    Despite a wealth of prior research (e.g., Wynd and Mager, 1989; Weber, 1990; Harris, 1991; Harris and Guffey, 1991; McCabe et al., 1991; Murphy and Boatright, 1994; Gautschi and Jones, 1998), little consensus has arisen about the goals and effectiveness of business ethics education. Additionally, accounting academics have recently been questioned as to their commitment to accounting ethics education (Gunz and McCutcheon, 1998). The current study examines whether accounting students' perceptions of business ethics and the goals of accounting (...)
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  13. Jens Beckert (2013). Imagined Futures: Fictional Expectations in the Economy. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 42 (3):219-240.score: 21.0
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  14. L. G. Humphreys (1939). Acquisition and Extinction of Verbal Expectations in a Situation Analogous to Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 25 (3):294.score: 21.0
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  15. L. G. Humphreys, J. Miller & D. G. Ellson (1940). The Effect of the Inter-Trial Interval on the Acquisition, Extinction, and Recovery of Verbal Expectations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (2):195-202.score: 21.0
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  16. Jasperien E. Van Doormaal, Peter G. M. Mol, Rianne J. Zaal, Patricia M. L. A. Van Den Bemt, Jos G. W. Kosterink, Karin M. Vermeulen & Flora M. Haaijer‐Ruskamp (2010). Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) System: Expectations and Experiences of Users. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (4):738-743.score: 21.0
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  17. G. Dowswell, T. Dowswell, J. Lawler, J. Green & J. Young (2002). Patients' and Caregivers' Expectations and Experiences of a Physiotherapy Intervention 1 Year Following Stroke: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (3):361-365.score: 21.0
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  18. André Lapied & Pascal Toquebeuf (2013). A Note on “Re-Examining the Law of Iterated Expectations for Choquet Decision Makers”. Theory and Decision 74 (3):439-445.score: 21.0
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  19. Sandra Pellanda Dieci, Laura Weise & Anne Monnier (2012). Analyse contrastée des attentes et des représentations d'étudiants en formation initiale à l'enseignement secondaire en fonction de leur engagement ou non dans un établissement scolaireComparative analysis of the students' expectations and representations in pre-service teacher training for secondary school depending on whether they have a student teaching placement or not. Phronesis 1 (2):63-81.score: 21.0
    In Geneva, since the beginning of pre-service secondary teacher training at university, two different types of students in teacher preparation coexist: some of them have got part-time classes, others have no teaching assignment. In an introduction to the teaching profession, students from different disciplines of the two types take a course on the same sources of professional knowledge. By analyzing the representations of the teaching profession, we find that the process of construction of their professional identity varies according to whether (...)
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  20. Roberto Casati & Elena Pasquinelli (2007). How Can You Be Surprised? The Case for Volatile Expectations. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):171-183.score: 20.0
    Surprise has been characterized has an emotional reaction to an upset belief having a heuristic role and playing a criterial role for belief ascription. The discussion of cases of diachronic and synchronic violations of coherence suggests that surprise plays an epistemic role and provides subjects with some sort of phenomenological access to their subpersonal doxastic states. Lack of surprise seems not to have the same epistemic power. A distinction between belief and expectation is introduced in order to account for some (...)
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  21. Miguel Garcia-Valdecasas (2013). Do Expectations Have Time Span? Axiomathes 23 (4):665-681.score: 20.0
    If it is possible to think that human life is temporal as a whole, and we can make sense of Wittgenstein’s claim that the psychological phenomena called ‘dispositions’ do not have genuine temporal duration on the basis of a distinction between dispositions and other mental processes, we need a compelling account of how time applies to these dispositions. I undertake this here by examining the concept of expectation, a disposition with a clear nexus to time by the temporal point at (...)
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  22. Claudio Mazzola (2013). Correlations, Deviations and Expectations: The Extended Principle of the Common Cause. Synthese 190 (14):2853-2866.score: 20.0
    The Principle of the Common Cause is usually understood to provide causal explanations for probabilistic correlations obtaining between causally unrelated events. In this study, an extended interpretation of the principle is proposed, according to which common causes should be invoked to explain positive correlations whose values depart from the ones that one would expect to obtain in accordance to her probabilistic expectations. In addition, a probabilistic model for common causes is tailored which satisfies the generalized version of the principle, (...)
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  23. Alan G. Sanfey (2009). Expectations and Social Decision-Making: Biasing Effects of Prior Knowledge on Ultimatum Responses. [REVIEW] Mind and Society 8 (1):93-107.score: 20.0
    Psychological studies have long demonstrated effects of expectations on judgment, whereby the provision of information, either implicitly or explicitly, prior to an experience or decision can exert a substantial influence on the observed behavior. This study extended these expectation effects to the domain of interactive economic decision-making. Prior to playing a commonly-used bargaining task, the Ultimatum Game, participants were primed to expect offers that would be either relatively fair (a roughly equal split of an endowed amount) or unfair (an (...)
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  24. Arthur Paul Pedersen (2014). Comparative Expectations. Studia Logica 102 (4):811-848.score: 20.0
    I introduce a mathematical account of expectation based on a qualitative criterion of coherence for qualitative comparisons between gambles (or random quantities). The qualitative comparisons may be interpreted as an agent’s comparative preference judgments over options or more directly as an agent’s comparative expectation judgments over random quantities. The criterion of coherence is reminiscent of de Finetti’s quantitative criterion of coherence for betting, yet it does not impose an Archimedean condition on an agent’s comparative judgments, it does not require the (...)
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  25. Alexander Zimper (2011). Re-Examining the Law of Iterated Expectations for Choquet Decision Makers. Theory and Decision 71 (4):669-677.score: 20.0
    Yoo (Economic Letters 37:145–149, 1991) argues that the law of iterated expectations must be violated if the probability measure of a Choquet decision maker is non-additive. In this article, we prove the positive result that the law of iterated expectations is satisfied for Choquet decision makers whenever they update their non-additive beliefs in accordance with the Sarin and Wakker (Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 16:223–250, 1998) update rule. The formal key to this result is the act-dependence of the (...)
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  26. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (2011). Perceptual Content and Sensorimotor Expectations. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):383-391.score: 18.0
    I distinguish between two kinds of sensorimotor expectations: agent- and object-active ones. Alva Noë's answer to the problem of how perception acquires volumetric content illicitly privileges agent-active expectations over object-active expectations, though the two are explanatorily on a par. Considerations which Noë draws upon concerning how organisms may ‘off-load’ internal processes onto the environment do not support his view that volumetric content depends on our embodiment; rather, they support a view of experience which is restrictive of the (...)
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  27. Frank Arntzenius & David McCarthy (1997). The Two Envelope Paradox and Infinite Expectations. Analysis 57 (1):42–50.score: 18.0
    The two envelope paradox can be dissolved by looking closely at the connection between conditional and unconditional expectation and by being careful when summing an infinite series of positive and negative terms. The two envelope paradox is not another St. Petersburg paradox and that one does not need to ban talk of infinite expectation values in order to dissolve it. The article ends by posing a new puzzle to do with infinite expectations.
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  28. Michael Luntley (2010). Expectations Without Content. Mind and Language 25 (2):217-236.score: 18.0
    In this paper I show how the way experience presents things to us can be treated without attributing a representational content to experience. The basic claim that experience can present us with more things than the range of things available to us in thought is neutral with respect to the choice between a content account of experience and a naïve content-free account. I show how Meyer's theory of expectations in accounting for our experience of music supports the naïve account. (...)
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  29. J. McKenzie Alexander (2011). Expectations and Choiceworthiness. Mind 120 (479):803-817.score: 18.0
    The Pasadena game is an example of a decision problem which lacks an expected value, as traditionally conceived. Easwaran (2008) has shown that, if we distinguish between two different kinds of expectations, which he calls ‘strong’ and ‘weak’, the Pasadena game lacks a strong expectation but has a weak expectation. Furthermore, he argues that we should use the weak expectation as providing a measure of the value of an individual play of the Pasadena game. By considering a modified version (...)
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  30. Peter D. Finch (1982). Classical Probability and the Quantum Mechanical Trace Formulation for Expectations. Foundations of Physics 12 (4):327-345.score: 18.0
    The trace formulation of quantum mechanical expectations is derived in a classical deterministic setting by averaging over an assembly of states. Interference of probabilities is discussed and its usual Hilbert space formulation is questioned. Nevertheless, it is shown that the observable predictions of quantum statics remain unchanged in the framework developed here.
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  31. J. Sprenger & R. Heesen (2011). The Bounded Strength of Weak Expectations. Mind 120 (479):819-832.score: 18.0
    The rational price of the Pasadena and Altadena games, introduced by Nover and Hájek (2004 ), has been the subject of considerable discussion. Easwaran (2008 ) has suggested that weak expectations — the value to which the average payoffs converge in probability — can give the rational price of such games. We argue against the normative force of weak expectations in the standard framework. Furthermore, we propose to replace this framework by a bounded utility perspective: this shift renders (...)
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  32. Alan Baker (2007). Putting Expectations in Order. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):692-700.score: 18.0
    In their paper, “Vexing Expectations,” Nover and Hájek (2004) present an allegedly paradoxical betting scenario which they call the Pasadena Game (PG). They argue that the silence of standard decision theory concerning the value of playing PG poses a serious problem. This paper provides a threefold response. First, I argue that the real problem is not that decision theory is “silent” concerning PG, but that it delivers multiple conflicting verdicts. Second, I offer a diagnosis of the problem based on (...)
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  33. Jenny Dawkins & Stewart Lewis (2003). CSR in Stakeholder Expectations: And Their Implication for Company Strategy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):185 - 193.score: 18.0
    Recent years have seen dramatic changes in the attitudes and expectations brought to bear on companies. Over ten years of research at MORI has shown the increasing prominence of corporate responsibility for a wide range of stakeholders, from consumers and employees to legislators and investors.
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  34. Kenny Easwaran (2014). Principal Values and Weak Expectations. Mind 123 (490):517-531.score: 18.0
    This paper evaluates a recent method proposed by Jeremy Gwiazda for calculating the value of gambles that fail to have expected values in the standard sense. I show that Gwiazda’s method fails to give answers for many gambles that do have standardly defined expected values. However, a slight modification of his method (based on the mathematical notion of the ‘Cauchy principal value’ of an integral), is in fact a proper extension of both his method and the method of ‘weak (...)’. I show that this method gives an appropriate value when the ‘tails’ of the gambles that are eliminated in the truncation are ‘stable’, but that the value is not appropriate when the tails are not stable. I do not attempt to give an argument for the use of this method, but just note that it is more general than Gwiazda’s method, and is mathematically quite natural. (shrink)
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  35. Philip J. Nickel (2009). Trust, Staking, and Expectations. Journal of the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (3):345–362.score: 18.0
    Trust is a kind of risky reliance on another person. Social scientists have offered two basic accounts of trust: predictive expectation accounts and staking (betting) accounts. Predictive expectation accounts identify trust with a judgment that performance is likely. Staking accounts identify trust with a judgment that reliance on the person’s performance is worthwhile. I argue (1) that these two views of trust are different, (2) that the staking account is preferable to the predictive expectation account on grounds of intuitive adequacy (...)
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  36. Sandra C. Vera-Muñoz (2005). Corporate Governance Reforms: Redefined Expectations of Audit Committee Responsibilities and Effectiveness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):115 - 127.score: 18.0
    Comprehensive regulatory changes brought on by recent corporate governance reforms have broadly redefined and re-emphasized the roles and responsibilities of all the participants in a public company’s financial reporting process. Most notably, these reforms have intensified scrutiny of corporate audit committees, whose role as protectors of investors’ interests now attracts substantially higher visibility and expectations. As a result, audit committees face the formidable challenge of effectively overseeing the company’s financial reporting process in a dramatically changed – and highly charged (...)
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  37. Maximiliane Jansky, Gabriella Marx, Friedemann Nauck & Bernd Alt-Epping (2013). Physicians' and Nurses' Expectations and Objections Toward a Clinical Ethics Committee. Nursing Ethics 20 (7):0969733013478308.score: 18.0
    The study aimed to explore the subjective need of healthcare professionals for ethics consultation, their experience with ethical conflicts, and expectations and objections toward a Clinical Ethics Committee. Staff at a university hospital took part in a survey (January to June 2010) using a questionnaire with open and closed questions. Descriptive data for physicians and nurses (response rate = 13.5%, n = 101) are presented. Physicians and nurses reported similar high frequencies of ethical conflicts but rated the relevance of (...)
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  38. Randi L. Sims & Thomas L. Keon (2000). The Influence of Organizational Expectations on Ethical Decision Making Conflict. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):219 - 228.score: 18.0
    This study considers the ethical decision making of individual employees and the influence their perception of organizational expectations has on employee feelings about the decision making process. A self-administered questionnaire design was used for gathering data in this study, with a sample size of 245 full-time employees. The match between the ethical alternative chosen by the respondent and that alternative perceived to be encouraged by his/her organization was found to be significantly related to both feelings of discomfort and feelings (...)
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  39. Juli Murphy, Joan Scott, David Kaufman, Gail Geller, Lisa LeRoy & Kathy Hudson (2008). Public Expectations for Return of Results From Large-Cohort Genetic Research. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):36 – 43.score: 18.0
    The National Institutes of Health and other federal health agencies are considering establishing a national biobank to study the roles of genes and environment in human health. A preliminary public engagement study was conducted to assess public attitudes and concerns about the proposed biobank, including the expectations for return of individual research results. A total of 141 adults of different ages, incomes, genders, ethnicities, and races participated in 16 focus groups in six locations across the country. Focus group participants (...)
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  40. Amos Nathan (1984). False Expectations. Philosophy of Science 51 (1):128-136.score: 18.0
    Common probabilistic fallacies and putative paradoxes are surveyed, including those arising from distribution repartitioning, from the reordering of expectation series, and from misconceptions regarding expected and almost certain gains in games of chance. Conditions are given for such games to be well-posed. By way of example, Bernoulli's "Petersburg Paradox" and Hacking's "Strange Expectations" are discussed and the latter are resolved. Feller's generalized "fair price, in the classical sense" is critically reviewed.
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  41. Dallas M. High & Howard B. Turner (1987). Surrogate Decision-Making: The Elderly's Familial Expectations. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 8 (3).score: 18.0
    This essay explores the preferences, anticipations and expectations of the elderly regarding the role of family members in making health care decisions for them should they become decisionally incapacitated. Findings are presented from a series of in-depth interviews of men and women aged 67–91 years. Following a discussion of the uncertain legal status of familial surrogate decision-making, we argue that the family unit's autonomy is sufficient to justify the elderly's preferred reliance on their own family. Further, we suggest that (...)
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  42. Brent Simpson & Henry A. Walker (2002). Status Characteristics and Performance Expectations: A Reformulation. Sociological Theory 20 (1):24-40.score: 18.0
    Status characteristics theory predicts the emergence and structure of power and prestige orders in task groups from members' status attributes. This paper argues that application of the burden of proof assumption, central to the theory, is inconsistent with a key concept, generalized expectation state. A reformulation is proposed that eliminates the inconsistency and gives competing predictions for a wide range of situations. The reformulation predicts that, when not directly relevant to task performance, specific characteristics (e.g., athletic or analytical ability) have (...)
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  43. Kevin Gary Behrens & Robyn Fellingham (2013). Great Expectations: Teaching Ethics to Medical Students in South Africa. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 18.0
    Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend (...)
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  44. K. Sorensen (2009). Genetic Enhancements and Expectations. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (7):433-435.score: 18.0
    Next SectionSome argue that genetic enhancements and environmental enhancements are not importantly different: environmental enhancements such as private schools and chess lessons are simply the old-school way to have a designer baby. I argue that there is an important distinction between the two practices—a distinction that makes state restrictions on genetic enhancements more justifiable than state restrictions on environmental enhancements. The difference is that parents have no settled expectations about genetic enhancements.
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  45. Stephan Dickert, Daniel Västfjäll, Janet Kleber & Paul Slovic (2012). Valuations of Human Lives: Normative Expectations and Psychological Mechanisms of (Ir)Rationality. Synthese 189 (S1):95-105.score: 18.0
    A central question for psychologists, economists, and philosophers is how human lives should be valued. Whereas egalitarian considerations give rise to models emphasizing that every life should be valued equally, empirical research has demonstrated that valuations of lives depend on a variety of factors that often do not conform to specific normative expectations. Such factors include emotional reactions to the victims and cognitive considerations leading to biased perceptions of lives at risk (e.g., attention, mental imagery, pseudo-inefficacy, and scope neglect). (...)
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  46. Francesco Ferraro (2013). Adjudication and Expectations: Bentham on the Role of Judges. Utilitas 25 (2):140-160.score: 18.0
    According to a well-established interpretive line, the Benthamic judge would be allowed no room for autonomous calculations of utility and his or her task would only be that of mechanically applying substantive law, which expresses the legislator's will. For Gerald Postema, in contrast, Bentham's judge would be granted ample power to decide cases by directly applying the principle of utility. This article criticizes both views, by showing that a adjudication was for Bentham utterly impossible, although this does not mean that (...)
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  47. Karin Helen Garrety (2008). Organisational Control and the Self: Critiques and Normative Expectations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):93 - 106.score: 18.0
    This article explores the normative assumptions about the self that are implicitly and explicitly embedded in critiques of organisational control. Two problematic aspects of control are examined – the capacity of some organisations to produce unquestioning commitment, and the elicitation of ‹false’ selves. Drawing on the work of Rom Harré, and some examples of organisational-self processes gone awry, I investigate the dynamics involved and how they violate the normative expectations that we hold regarding the self, particularly its moral autonomy (...)
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  48. Iris Aravot (2008). Architectural Making: Between a "Space of Experience" and a "Horizon of Expectations". Phaenex 3 (2):92-114.score: 18.0
    The paper suggests that architectural making , a process of research in practice , and itself a bridging between the space of experience and the horizon of expectations , corresponds to phenomenology as a method of inquiry. This includes architectural phases parallel to epoché, phenomenological reduction, free variations, transcendental intuition of the essence, and description . The paper describes the in-between, its two edges, experience and expectations, and their mutual influences through the process of architectural making. Examples from (...)
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  49. Bethany J. Spielman (1988). Financially Motivated Transfers and Discharges: Administrators' Ethics and Public Expectations. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):32-43.score: 18.0
    In response to a competitive environment, hospital administrators are pressuring physicians to discharge Medicare patients “sicker and quicker” and to transfer indigent patients from their emergency rooms. This paper compares health administrators' ethics to public expectations regarding financially motivated hospital transfers and discharges. Health administrators use balancing strategies: code morality, survivalism, mission dependency, and tithing. Public expectations, exemplified in P.L. 99–272, P.L. 99–509, and recent case law, are based on norms of potential for patient harm and patient occupancy. (...)
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  50. Alexander Brown (2012). Rawls, Buchanan, and the Legal Doctrine of Legitimate Expectations. Social Theory and Practice 38 (4):617-644.score: 18.0
    The article responds to an overlooked objection put by Allen Buchanan to John Rawls’s theory of justice: that implementing the Difference Principle over time may require gross and frequent disruptions of people’s framing and execution of long-term plans. Having strengthened Buchanan’s objection to resolve significant weaknesses in his main counterexample, I argue that the best response to this objection draws on the concept of the rule of law, specifically, the legal doctrine of legitimate expectations, which can be found in (...)
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