Search results for 'Experience (Religion' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    Ann Taves (2009). Religious Experience Reconsidered: A Building Block Approach to the Study of Religion and Other Special Things. Princeton University Press.
    I don't know of any other book like it."--Wayne Proudfoot, Columbia University "This is a terrific book. -/- The essence of religion was once widely thought to be a unique form of experience that could not be explained in neurological, psychological, or sociological terms. In recent decades scholars have questioned the privileging of the idea of religious experience in the study of religion, an approach that effectively isolated the study of religion from the social and natural sciences. Religious (...)
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  2. John Hick (2007). The New Frontier of Religion and Science: Religious Experience, Neuroscience, and the Transcendent. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This is the first major response to the new challenge of neuroscience to religion. There have been limited responses from a purely Christian point of view, but this takes account of eastern as well as western forms of religious experience. It challenges the prevailing naturalistic assumption of our culture, including the idea that the mind is either identical with or a temporary by-product of brain activity. It also discusses religion as institutions and religion as inner experience of the (...)
     
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  3.  34
    William James (1902). The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature: Being the Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion Delivered at Edinburgh in 1901-1902. Dover Publications.
    After completing his monumental work, The Principles of Psychology, William James turned his attention to serious consideration of such important religious and philosophical questions as the nature and existence of God, immortality of the soul, and free will and determinism. His interest in these questions found expression in various works, including The Varieties of Religious Experience, his classic study of spirituality. Based on the prestigious Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion he gave at the University of Edinburgh in 1901 and (...)
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  4.  15
    Marc Slors & Nina Azari (2007). From Brain Imaging Religious Experience to Explaining Religion: A Critique. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):67-85.
    Recent functional neuroimaging data, acquired in studies of religious experience, have been used to explain and justify religion and its origins. In this paper, we critique the move from describing brain activity associated with self-reported religious states, to explaining why there is religion at all. Toward that end, first we review recent neuroimaging findings on religious experience, and show how those results do not necessarily support a popular notion that religion has a primitive evolutionary origin. Importantly, we call (...)
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  5.  12
    Nina P. Azari & Marc Slors (2007). From Brain Imaging Religious Experience to Explaining Religion: A Critique. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):67-85.
    Recent functional neuroimaging data, acquired in studies of religious experience, have been used to explain and justify religion and its origins. In this paper, we critique the move from describing brain activity associated with self-reported religious states, to explaining why there is religion at all. Toward that end, first we review recent neuroimaging findings on religious experience, and show how those results do not necessarily support a popular notion that religion has a primitive evolutionary origin. Importantly, we call (...)
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  6. Phillip H. Wiebe (2006). Religious Experience, Cognitive Science, and the Future of Religion. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 503-522.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712249; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 503-522.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 519-522.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  7. Joseph Runzo, Craig K. Ihara & Alvin Plantinga (eds.) (1986). Religious Experience and Religious Belief: Essays in the Epistemology of Religion. University Press of America.
  8. Geddes Macgregor (1945). An Analysis of the Function of Aesthetic Experience in Religion.
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  9. Geddes Macgregor (1947). Aesthetic Experience in Religion. Macmillan.
     
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  10. Kenneth R. Overberg (1991). Roots & Branches: Grounding Religion in Human Experience. Sheed & Ward.
     
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  11. Anthony O'Hear (1984). Experience, Explanation, and Faith: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Routledge & K. Paul.
    In this book Anthony O’Hear examines the reasons that are given for religious faith. His approach is firmly within the classical tradition of natural theology, but an underlying theme is the differences between the personal Creator of the Bible or the Koran and a God conceived of as the indeterminate ground of everything determinate. Drawing on several religious traditions and on the resources of contemporary philosophy, specific chapters analyse the nature of religious faith and of religious experience. They examine (...)
     
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  12. Don Browning (2007). The Thickness of Experience, Religion, and the Varieties of Science. Zygon 42 (4):821-824.
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  13.  20
    Shawn Harte (2012). Hallucinatory Experience & Religion Formation. Philosophy Now 91:30-33.
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  14.  1
    George di Giovanni (2009). We Are Concerned in This Essay with the Experience of Religion in the Phenomenology, or, More Precisely, with the Concept of Religion Which We (the Philosophers) Construct on the Basis of That Experience. Religion is the Theme of Chapter VII, and There the Transition is Made to the Concept of Absolute Knowledge Which is the Object of the Concluding Chapter VIII. But the Phenomenon of Religion has in Fact Been Present From the Beginning, and We Already Witness It in Full-Blown Form at the End of Chapter VI, in an Experience Which We Might Call 'Thanksgiving', Where 'Confession'and 'Forgiveness' Play a Central Role.'Confession'and 'Forgiveness' Entail a Special Social Compact. Just Why. [REVIEW] In Kenneth R. Westphal (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Wiley-Blackwell
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  15.  98
    Timothy Fuller (2009). Oakeshott on the Character of Religious Experience: Need There Be a Conflict Between Science and Religion? Zygon 44 (1):153-167.
    Michael Oakeshott reflected on the character of religious experience in various writings throughout his life. In Experience and Its Modes (1933) he analyzed science as a distinctive "mode," or account of experience as a whole, identifying those assumptions necessary for science to achieve its coherent account of experience in contrast to other modes of experience whose quests for coherence depend on different assumptions. Religious experience, he thought, was integral to the practical mode. The latter (...)
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  16.  45
    Colin Jerolmack & Douglas Porpora (2004). Religion, Rationality, and Experience: A Response to the New Rational Choice Theory of Religion. Sociological Theory 22 (1):140-160.
    This paper is a critical response to the newest version of the rational choice theory of religion (RCTR). In comparison with previous critiques, this paper takes aim at RCTR's foundational assumption of psychological egoism and argues that the thesis of psychological egoism is untenable. Without that thesis, the normative aspects of religious commitment cannot be reduced validly to instrumental reason. On neither conceptual nor empirical grounds therefore can religion or religious commitment be defined comprehensively in terms of exchange theory. With (...)
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  17.  10
    Samuel Moyn (2007). From Experience to Law: Leo Strauss and the Weimar Crisis of the Philosophy of Religion. History of European Ideas 33 (2):174-194.
    This paper is a study of the origins of Leo Strauss's thought, arguing that its early development must be understood in the context of the philosophy of religion of late Wilhelmine and Weimar Germany. More specifically, it shows that Strauss's early works were written against the background of Kantian philosophy and post-Kantian accounts of religious experience, and that his turn towards medieval law as a topic and ideal was precipitated by the critique of those accounts by radical Protestant theologians (...)
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  18.  66
    James G. Hart (2009). Steinbock, Anthony J. Phenomenology and Mysticism: The Verticality of Religious Experience . Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 25 (2):169-175.
    Steinbock, Anthony J. Phenomenology and Mysticism: The Verticality of Religious Experience . Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10743-009-9056-8 Authors James G. Hart, Indiana University Department of Religious Studies Sycamore Hall 230 Bloomington IN 47405-7005 USA Journal Husserl Studies Online ISSN 1572-8501 Print ISSN 0167-9848 Journal Volume Volume 25 Journal Issue Volume 25, Number 2.
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  19.  8
    Kurt Keljo & Tom Christenson (2003). On the Relation of Morality and Religion: Two Lessons From James'sVarieties of Religious Experience. Journal of Moral Education 32 (4):385-396.
    Drawing chiefly on the reflections of William James in his classic work, The Varieties of Religious Experience, this article explores the dynamics of a mutually enriching relationship between religion and morality, whereby the two domains animate and inform each other. James's work is explored to suggest the outlines of such a relationship, while recent studies of moral exemplars and the thought of Martin Buber are drawn upon to extend and deepen the discussion. The thesis is that the best of (...)
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  20.  1
    John E. Smith (1981). The Tension Between Direct Experience and Argument in Religion. Religious Studies 17 (4):487 - 497.
    There is an undercurrent to be detected in Anselm's record of the meditative experience that issued in the Ontological Argument and, although it points to a profound and perennial problem in the interpretation of religion, this undercurrent has been largely ignored. The Argument, as is well known, moves entirely within the medium of reflective meaning focused on the idea of God and, unlike the cosmological arguments of later theologians, it makes no appeal whatever to a principle of causality or (...)
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  21. James D. Proctor (ed.) (2005). Science, Religion, and the Human Experience: The Rebirth of America's Urban Neighborhoods. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The relationship between science and religion is generally depicted in one of two ways. In one view, they are locked in an inevitable, eternal conflict in which one must choose a side. In the other, they are separate spheres, in which the truth claims of one have little bearing on the other. This collection of provocative essays by leading thinkers offers a new way of looking at this problematic relationship. The authors begin from the premise that both science and religion (...)
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  22. Anthony O'Hear (2013). Experience, Explanation and Faith: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Routledge.
    In this book Anthony O’Hear examines the reasons that are given for religious faith. His approach is firmly within the classical tradition of natural theology, but an underlying theme is the differences between the personal Creator of the Bible or the Koran and a God conceived of as the indeterminate ground of everything determinate. Drawing on several religious traditions and on the resources of contemporary philosophy, specific chapters analyse the nature of religious faith and of religious experience. They examine (...)
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  23. Stephen S. Bush (2014). Visions of Religion: Experience, Meaning, and Power. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Winner of the Gustave O. Arlt Award in the HumanitiesThree understandings of the nature of religion--religion as experience, symbolic meaning, and power--have dominated scholarly discussions, in succession, for the past hundred years. Proponents of each of these three approaches have tended to downplay, ignore, or actively criticize the others. But why should the three approaches be at odds? Religion as it is practiced involves experiences, meanings, and power, so students of religion should attend to all three. Furthermore, theorists of (...)
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  24. Wilhelm Dupré (2007). Experience and Religion: Configurations and Perspectives. Ars Disputandi 7:1566-5399.
     
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  25.  33
    Jay L. Garfield, Shaun Nichols, Arun K. Rai & Nina Strohminger (2015). Ego, Egoism and the Impact of Religion on Ethical Experience: What a Paradoxical Consequence of Buddhist Culture Tells Us About Moral Psychology. Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):293-304.
    We discuss the structure of Buddhist theory, showing that it is a kind of moral phenomenology directed to the elimination of egoism through the elimination of a sense of self. We then ask whether being raised in a Buddhist culture in which the values of selflessness and the sense of non-self are so deeply embedded transforms one’s sense of who one is, one’s ethical attitudes and one’s attitude towards death, and in particular whether those transformations are consistent with the predictions (...)
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  26.  41
    William James (1991). The Varieties of Religious Experience. Triumph Books.
    'By their fruits ye shall know them, not by their roots.'The Varieties of Religious Experience is William James's classic survey of religious belief in its most personal, and often its most heterodox, aspects. Asking questions such as how we define evil to ourselves, the difference between a healthy and a divided mind, the value of saintly behaviour, and what animates and characterizes the mental landscape of sudden conversion, James's masterpiece stands at a unique moment in the relationship between belief (...)
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  27.  7
    Pieter Walinga, Jozef Corveleyn & Joke van Saane (2005). Guilt and Religion: The Influence of Orthodox Protestant and Orthodox Catholic Conceptions of Guilt on Guilt-Experience. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 27 (1):113-136.
    This research examines whether religious conceptions of guilt in Protestant and Roman Catholic groups account for constructive or non-constructive guilt-reactions and for different guilt-frequency. Participants in three groups filled in the Leuven Guilt and Shame Scale , the Leuven Emotion Scale and the Post Critical Belief Scale . Protestants were expected to experience more non-constructive guilt than Catholics, who were expected to experience more constructive guilt. Both were expected to have a higher frequency of guilt experience than (...)
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  28.  5
    Pieter Walinga, Jozef Corveleyn & Joke van Saane (2005). Guilt and Religion: The Influence of Orthodox Protestant and Orthodox Catholic Conceptions of Guilt on Guilt-Experience. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 27 (1):113-136.
    This research examines whether religious conceptions of guilt in Protestant and Roman Catholic groups account for constructive or non-constructive guilt-reactions and for different guilt-frequency. Participants in three groups filled in the Leuven Guilt and Shame Scale , the Leuven Emotion Scale and the Post Critical Belief Scale . Protestants were expected to experience more non-constructive guilt than Catholics, who were expected to experience more constructive guilt. Both were expected to have a higher frequency of guilt experience than (...)
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  29.  1
    E. G. Bewkes, H. B. Jefferson, E. T. Adams & H. A. Brautigam (1942). Experience, Reason and Faith: A Survey in Philosophy and Religion. Philosophical Review 51 (1):81-82.
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  30.  1
    William Ernest Hocking (1913). The Meaning of God in Human Experience: A Philosophic Study of Religion. Philosophical Review 22 (5):546-550.
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  31.  1
    George Trumbull Ladd (1906). The Philosophy of Religion: A Critical and Speculative Treatise of Man's Religious Experience and Development in the Light of Modern Science and Reflective Thinking. Philosophical Review 15 (5):528-536.
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  32. Eugene Garrett Bewkes (1940). Experience, Reason and Faith a Survey in Philosophy and Religion [by] Eugene Garett Bewkes [and Others]. Harper.
     
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  33. Zeʹev W. Falk (1981). Law and Religion: The Jewish Experience. Mesharim Publishers.
     
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  34. Maurice S. Friedman (1981). The Human Way a Dialogic Approach to Religion and Human Experience : Via Humana. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  35. Mohammed Maruf (1977). Iqbal's Philosophy of Religion: A Study in the Cognitive Value of Religious Experience. Islamic Book Service.
     
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  36. Warren Nelson Nevius (1941). Religion as Experience and Truth. Philadelphia, the Westminster Press.
     
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  37. Anthony O'hear (1984). Experience, Explanation, and Faith an Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion /Anthony O'hear. --. --. Routledge & K. Paul,1984.
     
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  38.  32
    Lancelot Law Whyte (1974). The Universe of Experience: A Worldview Beyond Science and Religion. Transaction Publishers.
    Avoiding the seductive trap of utopianism, Whyte approaches this challenge by defining the terms of a potentially worldwide consensus of heart, mind, and will ...
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  39.  9
    Matthew C. Bagger (2016). Stephen S. Bush: Visions of Religion: Experience, Meaning, and Power. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 79 (2):161-165.
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  40.  18
    Robert H. Sharf (2000). The Rhetoric of Experience and the Study of Religion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):11-12.
    The use of the concept ‘religious experience’ is exceedingly broad, encompassing a vast array of feelings, moods, perceptions, dispositions, and states of consciousness. Some prefer to focus on a distinct type of religious experience known as ‘mystical experience', typically construed as a transitory but potentially transformative state of consciousness in which a subject purports to come into immediate contact with the divine, the sacred, the holy. We will return to the issue of mystical experience below. Here (...)
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  41.  9
    William A. Rottschaefer (1985). Religious Cognition as Interpreted Experience: An Examination of Ian Barbour's Comparison of the Epistemic Structures of Science and Religion. Zygon 20 (3):265-282.
    . Using as a model contemporary analyses of scientific cognition, Ian Harbour has claimed that religious cognition is neither immediate nor inferential but has the structure of interpreted experience. Although I contend that Barbour has failed to establish his claim, I believe his views about the similarities between scientific and religious cognition are well founded. Thus on that basis I offer an alternative proposal that theistic religious cognition is essentially inferential and that religious experience is in fact the (...)
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  42.  29
    Paul Jerome Croce (2002). David C. Lamberth, William James and the Metaphysics of Experience [Cambridge Studies in Religion and Critical Though, No. 5]. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 51 (1):65-67.
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  43.  8
    Jordan B. Peterson (2006). Religion, Sovereignty, Natural Rights, and the Constituent Elements of Experience. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 28 (1):135-180.
    It is commonly held that the idea of natural rights originated with the ancient Greeks, and was given full form by more modern philosophers such as John Locke, who believed that natural rights were apprehensible primarily to reason. The problem with this broad position is three-fold: first, it is predicated on the presumption that the idea of rights is modern, biologically speaking ; second, it makes it appear that reason and rights are integrally, even causally, linked; finally, it legitimizes debate (...)
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  44.  23
    Houston A. Craighead (2005). Book Review: Adam Hood (Ed.), Baillie, Oman and Macmurray: Experience and Religious Belief, Ashgate New Critical Thinking in Religion, Theology and Biblical Studies Series. Hants, England and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company, 2003, X + 216 Pages, $99.95. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58 (1):59-62.
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  45.  17
    Victoria S. Harrison (2010). Postmodern Thought and Religion: Open-Traditionalism and Radical Orthodoxy on Religious Belief and Experience. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):962-974.
    This paper considers some of the ways in which ‘postmodernism’ is construed, before turning to several important representative examples of religious postmodern thought. It highlights some common features possessed by prominent examples of religious postmodern thought within Judaism and Christianity. Much postmodern religious thought is characterised by the separation of religious belief from religious experience, and is marked by the tendency to emphasise the latter at the expense of the former. This paper argues that, despite this tendency, the work (...)
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  46.  12
    Terrence W. Tilley (1999). Vincent Brümmer and Marcel Sarot (Eds.) Revelation and Experience [Proceedings of the 11th Biennial European Conference on the Philosophy of Religion]. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 46 (2):119-122.
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  47.  15
    Theodore Runyon (1992). The Role of Experience in Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 31 (2/3):187 - 194.
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  48.  1
    Jordan B. Peterson (2006). Religion, Sovereignty, Natural Rights, and the Constituent Elements of Experience. Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie 28 (1):135-180.
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  49.  1
    Stewart R. Sutherland (1984). Religion, Experience and Privacy: STEWART R. SUTHERLAND. Religious Studies 20 (1):121-132.
    It is of course true that the articulation of religious and theological views depends upon and often masks philosophical presuppositions. For example, those who quote with approval Anselm's ‘credo ut intelligam’, ‘I believe so that I may understand’, seldom follow the good example set by Anselm, and make explicit, as Anselm does in the following sentence, the fact that this principle rests upon a further principle: ‘For I believe this also, that “unless I believe, I shall not understand”’ . This (...)
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  50. Jeremy Carrette (2005). Pt. 2. James, Psychology and Religion. Listening to James a Century Later : The Varieties as a Resource for Renewing the Psychology of Religion / David M. Wulff ; the Varieties, the Principles and Psychology of Religion : Unremitting Inspiration From a Different Source / Jacob A. Belzen ; Passionate Belief : William James, Emotion and Religious Experience. [REVIEW] In Jeremy R. Carrette (ed.), William James and the Varieties of Religious Experience: A Centenary Celebration. Routledge
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