Search results for 'Expertise' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Timothy Williamson (2011). Philosophical Expertise and the Burden of Proof. Metaphilosophy 42 (3):215-229.
    Abstract: Some proponents of “experimental philosophy” criticize philosophers' use of thought experiments on the basis of evidence that the verdicts vary with truth-independent factors. However, their data concern the verdicts of philosophically untrained subjects. According to the expertise defence, what matters are the verdicts of trained philosophers, who are more likely to pay careful attention to the details of the scenario and track their relevance. In a recent article, Jonathan M. Weinberg and others reply to the expertise defence (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   41 citations  
  2. Regina A. Rini (2015). How Not to Test for Philosophical Expertise. Synthese 192 (2):431-452.
    Recent empirical work appears to suggest that the moral intuitions of professional philosophers are just as vulnerable to distorting psychological factors as are those of ordinary people. This paper assesses these recent tests of the ‘expertise defense’ of philosophical intuition. I argue that the use of familiar cases and principles constitutes a methodological problem. Since these items are familiar to philosophers, but not ordinary people, the two subject groups do not confront identical cognitive tasks. Reflection on this point shows (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. Regina A. Rini (2014). Analogies, Moral Intuitions, and the Expertise Defence. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (2):169-181.
    The evidential value of moral intuitions has been challenged by psychological work showing that the intuitions of ordinary people are affected by distorting factors. One reply to this challenge, the expertise defence, claims that training in philosophical thinking confers enhanced reliability on the intuitions of professional philosophers. This defence is often expressed through analogy: since we do not allow doubts about folk judgments in domains like mathematics or physics to undermine the plausibility of judgments by experts in these domains, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4. Moti Mizrahi (2015). Three Arguments Against the Expertise Defense. Metaphilosophy 46 (1):52-64.
    Experimental philosophers have challenged friends of the expertise defense to show that the intuitive judgments of professional philosophers are different from the intuitive judgments of nonphilosophers, and the intuitive judgments of professional philosophers are better than the intuitive judgments of nonphilosophers, in ways that are relevant to the truth or falsity of such judgments. Friends of the expertise defense have responded by arguing that the burden of proof lies with experimental philosophers. This article sketches three arguments which show (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5. Wesley Buckwalter (2014). Intuition Fail: Philosophical Activity and the Limits of Expertise. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (2):378-410.
    Experimental philosophers have empirically challenged the connection between intuition and philosophical expertise. This paper reviews these challenges alongside other research findings in cognitive science on expert performance and argues for three claims. First, evidence taken to challenge philosophical expertise may also be explained by the well-researched failures and limitations of genuine expertise. Second, studying the failures and limitations of experts across many fields provides a promising research program upon which to base a new model of philosophical (...). Third, a model of philosophical expertise based on the limitations of genuine experts may suggest a series of constraints on the reliability of professional philosophical intuition. Even when the experts all agree, they may well be mistaken. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  46
    Matt Stichter (2015). Philosophical and Psychological Accounts of Expertise and Experts. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 28:105-128.
    There are many philosophical problems surrounding experts, given the power and status accorded to them in society. We think that what makes someone an expert is having expertise in some skill domain. But what does expertise consist in, and how closely related is expertise to the notion of an expert? Although most of us have acquired several practical skills, few of us have achieved the level of expertise with regard to those skills. So we can be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Matt Stichter (2007). Ethical Expertise: The Skill Model of Virtue. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):183 - 194.
    Julia Annas is one of the few modern writers on virtue that has attempted to recover the ancient idea that virtues are similar to skills. In doing so, she is arguing for a particular account of virtue, one in which the intellectual structure of virtue is analogous to the intellectual structure of practical skills. The main benefit of this skill model of virtue is that it can ground a plausible account of the moral epistemology of virtue. This benefit, though, is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  8.  11
    Silke Schicktanz, Mark Schweda & Brian Wynne (2012). Erratum To: The Ethics of 'Public Understanding of Ethics'—Why and How Bioethics Expertise Should Include Public and Patients' Voices. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):251-251.
    “Ethics” is used as a label for a new kind of expertise in the field of science and technology. At the same time, it is not clear what ethical expertise consists in and what its political status in modern democracies can be. Starting from the “participatory turn” in recent social research and policy, we will argue that bioethical reasoning has to include public views of and attitudes towards biomedicine. We will sketch the outlines of a bioethical conception of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  9.  16
    Joachim Horvath & Alex Wiegmann (forthcoming). Intuitive Expertise and Intuitions About Knowledge. Philosophical Studies:1-26.
    Experimental restrictionists have challenged philosophers’ reliance on intuitions about thought experiment cases based on experimental findings. According to the expertise defense, only the intuitions of philosophical experts count—yet the bulk of experimental philosophy consists in studies with lay people. In this paper, we argue that direct strategies for assessing the expertise defense are preferable to indirect strategies. A direct argument in support of the expertise defense would have to show: first, that there is a significant difference between (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  33
    Harry Collins (2004). Interactional Expertise as a Third Kind of Knowledge. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):125-143.
    Between formal propositional knowledge and embodied skill lies ‘interactional expertise’—the ability to converse expertly about a practical skill or expertise, but without being able to practice it, learned through linguistic socialisation among the practitioners. Interactional expertise is exhibited by sociologists of scientific knowledge, by scientists themselves and by a large range of other actors. Attention is drawn to the distinction between the social and the individual embodiment theses: a language does depend on the form of the bodies (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  11.  80
    Harry Collins (2013). Three Dimensions of Expertise. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):253-273.
    Psychologists and philosophers tend to treat expertise as a property of special individuals. These are individuals who have devoted much more time than the general population to the acquisition of their specific expertises. They are often said to pass through stages as they move toward becoming experts, for example, passing from an early stage, in which they follow self-conscious rules, to an expert stage in which skills are executed unconsciously. This approach is ‘one-dimensional’. Here, two extra dimensions are added. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12.  33
    Rodrigo Ribeiro (2013). Levels of Immersion, Tacit Knowledge and Expertise. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):367-397.
    This paper elaborates on the link between different types and degrees of experience that can be gone through within a form of life or collectivity—the so-called levels of immersion—and the development of distinct types of tacit knowledge and expertise. The framework is then probed empirically and theoretically. In the first case, its ‘predictions’ are compared with the accounts of novices who have gone through different ‘learning opportunities’ during a pre-operational training programme for running a huge nickel industrial plant in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  13.  88
    Kyle Powys Whyte & Robert Crease (2010). Trust, Expertise and the Philosophy of Science. Synthese 177 (3):411-425.
    Trust is a central concept in the philosophy of science. We highlight how trust is important in the wide variety of interactions between science and society. We claim that examining and clarifying the nature and role of trust (and distrust) in relations between science and society is one principal way in which the philosophy of science is socially relevant. We argue that philosophers of science should extend their efforts to develop normative conceptions of trust that can serve to facilitate trust (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  14.  29
    Jukka Varelius (2014). Medical Expertise, Existential Suffering and Ending Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):104-107.
    In this article, I assess the position that voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide ought not to be accepted in the cases of persons who suffer existentially but who have no medical condition, because existential questions do not fall within the domain of physicians’ professional expertise. I maintain that VE and PAS based on suffering arising from medical conditions involves existential issues relevantly similar to those confronted in connection with existential suffering. On that basis I conclude that if VE and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  56
    Axel Gelfert (2011). Expertise, Argumentation, and the End of Inquiry. Argumentation 25 (3):297-312.
    This paper argues that the problem of expertise calls for a rapprochement between social epistemology and argumentation theory. Social epistemology has tended to emphasise the role of expert testimony, neglecting the argumentative function of appeals to expert opinion by non-experts. The first half of the paper discusses parallels and contrasts between the two cases of direct expert testimony and appeals to expert opinion by our epistemic peers, respectively. Importantly, appeals to expert opinion need to be advertised as such, if (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  10
    Taylor Martin, Karen Rayne, Nate J. Kemp, Jack Hart & Kenneth R. Diller (2005). Teaching for Adaptive Expertise in Biomedical Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):257-276.
    This paper considers an approach to teaching ethics in bioengineering based on the How People Learn (HPL) framework. Curricula based on this framework have been effective in mathematics and science instruction from the kindergarten to the college levels. This framework is well suited to teaching bioengineering ethics because it helps learners develop “adaptive expertise”. Adaptive expertise refers to the ability to use knowledge and experience in a domain to learn in unanticipated situations. It differs from routine expertise, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  17.  71
    Fernand Gobet & Philippe Chassy (2009). Expertise and Intuition: A Tale of Three Theories. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (2):151-180.
    Several authors have hailed intuition as one of the defining features of expertise. In particular, while disagreeing on almost anything that touches on human cognition and artificial intelligence, Hubert Dreyfus and Herbert Simon agreed on this point. However, the highly influential theories of intuition they proposed differed in major ways, especially with respect to the role given to search and as to whether intuition is holistic or analytic. Both theories suffer from empirical weaknesses. In this paper, we show how, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  18. Jimmy Alfonso Licon (2012). Sceptical Thoughts on Philosophical Expertise. Logos and Episteme 3 (3):449-458.
    My topic is two-fold: a reductive account of expertise as an epistemic phenomenon, and applying the reductive account to the question of whether or not philosophers enjoy expertise. I conclude, on the basis of the reductive account, that even though philosophers enjoy something akin to second-order expertise (i.e. they are often experts on the positions of other philosophers, current trends in the philosophical literature, the history of philosophy, conceptual analysis and so on), they nevertheless lack first-order philosophical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  21
    Christopher Hitchcock (2012). Thought Experiments, Real Experiments, and the Expertise Objection. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (2):205-218.
    It is a commonplace that in philosophy, intuitions supply evidence for and against philosophical theories. Recent work in experimental philosophy has brought to bear the intuitions of philosophically naïve subjects in a number of different ways. One line of response to this work has been to claim that philosophers have expertise that privileges their intuitive judgments, and allows them to disregard the judgments of non-experts. This expertise is supposed to be analogous to the expertise of the mathematician (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  19
    Tim Thornton (2010). Clinical Judgement, Expertise and Skilled Coping. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):284-291.
    Medicine involves specific practical expertise as well as more general context-independent medical knowledge. This raises the question, what is the nature of the expertise involved? Is there a model of clinical judgement or understanding that can accommodate both elements? This paper begins with a summary of a published account of the kinds of situation-specific skill found in anaesthesia. It authors claim that such skills are often neglected because of a prejudice in favour of the ‘technical rationality’ exemplified in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  21.  54
    Harry Collins & Martin Weinel (2011). Transmuted Expertise: How Technical Non-Experts Can Assess Experts and Expertise. [REVIEW] Argumentation 25 (3):401-413.
    To become an expert in a technical domain means acquiring the tacit knowledge pertaining to the relevant domain of expertise, at least, according to the programme known as “Studies of Expertise and Experience” (SEE). We know only one way to acquire tacit knowledge and that is through some form of sustained social contact with the group that has it. Those who do not have such contact cannot acquire the expertise needed to make technical judgments. They can, however, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  92
    Michael Cholbi (2007). Moral Expertise and the Credentials Problem. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):323-334.
    Philosophers have harbored doubts about the possibility of moral expertise since Plato. I argue that irrespective of whether moral experts exist, identifying who those experts are is insurmountable because of the credentials problem: Moral experts have no need to seek out others’ moral expertise, but moral non-experts lack sufficient knowledge to determine whether the advice provided by a putative moral expert in response to complex moral situations is correct and hence whether an individual is a bone fide expert. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  23.  34
    Michael Harré, Terry Bossomaier & Allan Snyder (2011). The Development of Human Expertise in a Complex Environment. Minds and Machines 21 (3):449-464.
    We introduce an innovative technique that quantifies human expertise development in such a way that humans and artificial systems can be directly compared. Using this technique we are able to highlight certain fundamental difficulties associated with the learning of a complex task that humans are still exceptionally better at than their computer counterparts. We demonstrate that expertise goes through significant developmental transitions that have previously been predicted but never explicated. The first signals the onset of a steady increase (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24.  30
    Harry Collins (2013). The Core of Expertise. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):399-416.
    I reply to my critics in respect of my work on expertise. I define the 'core' of the multidisciplinary 'expertise studies'. I argue that those who have taken the work seriously could resolve their problems by paying more attention to the core. Each could have made good use of an aspect of the core.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  21
    Kevin C. Elliott (2006). An Ethics of Expertise Based on Informed Consent. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):637-661.
    Ethicists widely accept the notion that scientists have moral responsibilities to benefit society at large. The dissemination of scientific information to the public and its political representatives is central to many of the ways in which scientists serve society. Unfortunately, the task of providing information can often give rise to moral quandaries when scientific experts participate in politically charged debates over issues that are fraught with uncertainty. This paper develops a theoretical framework for an “ethics of expertise” (EOE) based (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  26.  22
    Theresa Schilhab (2013). Derived Embodiment and Imaginative Capacities in Interactional Expertise. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):309-325.
    Interactional expertise is said to be a form of knowledge achieved in a linguistic community and, therefore, obtained entirely outside practice. Supposedly, it is not or only minimally sustained by the so-called embodied knowledge. Here, drawing upon studies in contemporary neuroscience and cognitive psychology, I propose that ‘derived’ embodiment is deeply involved in competent language use and, therefore, also in interactional expertise. My argument consists of two parts. First, I argue for a strong relationship among language acquisition, language (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  5
    Antonis C. Stylianou, Susan Winter, Yuan Niu, Robert A. Giacalone & Matt Campbell (2013). Understanding the Behavioral Intention to Report Unethical Information Technology Practices: The Role of Machiavellianism, Gender, and Computer Expertise. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):333-343.
    Although organizations can derive competitive advantage from developing and implementing information systems, they are confronted with a rising number of unethical information practices. Because end-users and computer experts are the conduit to an ethical organizational environment, their intention to report unethical IT-related practices plays a critical role in protecting intellectual property and privacy rights. Using the survey methodology, this article investigates the relationship between willingness to report intellectual property and privacy violations and Machiavellianism, gender and computer literacy in the form (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  17
    Michael Harré & Allan Snyder (2012). Intuitive Expertise and Perceptual Templates. Minds and Machines 22 (3):167-182.
    We provide the first demonstration of an artificial neural network encoding the perceptual templates that form an important component of the high level strategic understanding developed by experts. Experts have a highly refined sense of knowing where to look, what information is important and what information to ignore. The conclusions these experts reach are of a higher quality and typically made in a shorter amount of time than those of non-experts. Understanding the manifestation of such abilities in terms of both (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  8
    Jukka Varelius (2008). Is Ethical Expertise Possible? Medicine Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):127-132.
    Services of ethics committees are nowadays commonly used in such various spheres of life as health care, public administration, business, law, engineering, and scientific research. It is taken that as their members have expertise in ethics, these committees can have valuable contributions to make in solving practical moral problems. It has, however, also been maintained that it is simply absurd to claim that one has some special knowledge and skills in moral matters; in connection with moral questions there is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  18
    Sergio Román & Pedro J. Cuestas (2008). The Perceptions of Consumers Regarding Online Retailers' Ethics and Their Relationship with Consumers' General Internet Expertise and Word of Mouth: A Preliminary Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):641 - 656.
    Ethical concerns of Internet users continue to rise. Accordingly, several scholars have called for systematic empirical research to address these issues. This study examines the conceptualization and measurement of consumers' perceptions regarding the ethics of online retailers (CPEOR). Also, this research represents a first step into the analysis of the relationship between CPEOR, consumers' general Internet expertise and reported positive word of mouth (WOM). Results, from a convenience sample of 357 online shoppers, suggest that CPEOR can be operationalized as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31.  29
    Zoltan P. Majdik & William M. Keith (2011). Expertise as Argument: Authority, Democracy, and Problem-Solving. [REVIEW] Argumentation 25 (3):371-384.
    This article addresses the problem of expertise in a democratic political system: the tension between the authority of expertise and the democratic values that guide political life. We argue that for certain problems, expertise needs to be understood as a dialogical process, and we conceptualize an understanding of expertise through and as argument that positions expertise as constituted by and a function of democratic values and practices, rather than in the possession of, acquisition of, or (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  53
    Nicolas Bommarito (2010). Rationally Self-Ascribed Anti-Expertise. Philosophical Studies 151 (3):413-19.
    In their paper, “I Can’t Believe I’m Stupid,” Adam Elga and Andy Egan introduce a notion of anti-expertise and argue that it is never rational to believe oneself to be an anti-expert. I wish to deny the claim that it is never rational for agents like us to ascribe anti-expertise to ourselves by describing cases where self-ascribed anti-expertise makes real life agents more rational.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  22
    Michael H. Connors, Bruce D. Burns & Guillermo Campitelli (2011). Expertise in Complex Decision Making: The Role of Search in Chess 70 Years After de Groot. Cognitive Science 35 (8):1567-1579.
    One of the most influential studies in all expertise research is de Groot’s (1946) study of chess players, which suggested that pattern recognition, rather than search, was the key determinant of expertise. Many changes have occurred in the chess world since de Groot’s study, leading some authors to argue that the cognitive mechanisms underlying expertise have also changed. We decided to replicate de Groot’s study to empirically test these claims and to examine whether the trends in the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  28
    Markus Seidel (2014). Throwing the Baby Out with the Water: From Reasonably Scrutinizing Authorities to Rampant Scepticism About Expertise. Informal Logic 34 (2):192-218.
    In this paper, I argue that many arguments from expert opinion are strong arguments. Therefore, in many cases it is rational to rely on experts since in many cases the fact that an expert says that p makes it highly likely that p is true. I will defend this claim by providing 5 arguments that illuminate and elaborate on 5 crucial claims about expertise. In this way, I aim to undermine recent attempts to establish a rampant scepticism about arguments (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  5
    Matthew Fisher & Frank C. Keil (2015). The Curse of Expertise: When More Knowledge Leads to Miscalibrated Explanatory Insight. Cognitive Science 40 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Does expertise within a domain of knowledge predict accurate self-assessment of the ability to explain topics in that domain? We find that expertise increases confidence in the ability to explain a wide variety of phenomena. However, this confidence is unwarranted; after actually offering full explanations, people are surprised by the limitations in their understanding. For passive expertise, miscalibration is moderated by education; those with more education are accurate in their self-assessments. But when those with more education consider (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  66
    Mark Addis (2013). Linguistic Competence and Expertise. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):327-336.
    Questions about the relationship between linguistic competence and expertise will be examined in the paper. Harry Collins and others distinguish between ubiquitous and esoteric expertise. Collins places considerable weight on the argument that ordinary linguistic competence and related phenomena exhibit a high degree of expertise. His position and ones which share close affinities are methodologically problematic. These difficulties matter because there is continued and systematic disagreement over appropriate methodologies for the empirical study of expertise. Against Collins, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  51
    Justin Tiwald (2012). Xunzi on Moral Expertise. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):275-293.
    This paper is about two proposals endorsed by Xunzi. The first is that there is such a thing as a moral expert, whose moral advice we should adopt even when we cannot appreciate for ourselves the considerations in favor of it. The second is that certain political authorities should be treated as moral experts. I identify three fundamental questions about moral expertise that contemporary philosophy has yet to address in depth, explicate Xunzi’s answers to them, and then give an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  23
    Nicky Priaulx, Martin Weinel & Anthony Wrigley (forthcoming). Rethinking Moral Expertise. Health Care Analysis:1-14.
    We argue that the way in which the concept of expertise is understood and invoked has prevented progress in the debate as to whether moral philosophers can be said to be ‘moral experts’. We offer an account of expertise that draws on the role of tacit knowledge in order to provide a basis upon which the debate can progress. Our analysis consists of three parts. In the first part we highlight two specific problems in the way that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  12
    Eric Vogelstein (2015). The Nature and Value of Bioethics Expertise. Bioethics 29 (5):324-333.
    In this article, I address the extent to which experts in bioethics can contribute to healthcare delivery by way of aid in clinical decision-making and policy-formation. I argue that experts in bioethics are moral experts, in that their substantive moral views are more likely to be correct than those of non-bioethicists, all else being equal, but that such expertise is of use in a relatively limited class of cases. In so doing, I respond to two recent arguments against the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  7
    Svitlana V. Pustovit (2006). Some Methodological Aspects of Ethics Committees' Expertise: The Ukrainian Example. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):85-94.
    Today local, national and international ethics committees have become an effective means of social regulation in many European countries. Science itself is an important precondition for the development of bioethical knowledge and ethics expertise. Cultural, social, historical and religious preconditions can facilitate different forms and methods of ethics expertise in each country. Ukrainian ethics expertise has some methodological problems connected with its socio-cultural, historical, science and philosophy development particularities. In this context, clarification of some common legitimacies or (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  33
    Robert C. Reed (2013). Euthyphro's Elenchus Experience: Ethical Expertise and Self-Knowledge. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):245-259.
    The paper argues that everyday ethical expertise requires an openness to an experience of self-doubt very different from that involved in becoming expert in other skills—namely, an experience of profound vulnerability to the Other similar to that which Emmanuel Levinas has described. Since the experience bears a striking resemblance to that of undergoing cross-examination by Socrates as depicted in Plato’s early dialogues, I illustrate it through a close reading of the Euthyphro, arguing that Euthyphro’s vaunted “expertise” conceals a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  32
    Michael D. Lee, Mark Steyvers, Mindy de Young & Brent Miller (2012). Inferring Expertise in Knowledge and Prediction Ranking Tasks. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):151-163.
    We apply a cognitive modeling approach to the problem of measuring expertise on rank ordering problems. In these problems, people must order a set of items in terms of a given criterion (e.g., ordering American holidays through the calendar year). Using a cognitive model of behavior on this problem that allows for individual differences in knowledge, we are able to infer people's expertise directly from the rankings they provide. We show that our model-based measure of expertise outperforms (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  32
    William Rehg (2011). Evaluating Complex Collaborative Expertise: The Case of Climate Change. [REVIEW] Argumentation 25 (3):385-400.
    Science advisory committees exercise complex collaborative expertise. Not only do committee members collaborate, they do so across disciplines, producing expert reports that make synthetic multidisciplinary arguments. When reports are controversial, critics target both report content and committee process. Such controversies call for the assessment of expert arguments, but the multidisciplinary character of the debate outstrips the usual methods developed by informal logicians for assessing appeals to expert authority. This article proposes a multi-dimensional contextualist framework for critical assessment and tests (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  10
    Daniel D. Hutto & Raúl Sánchez-García (2015). Choking RECtified: Embodied Expertise Beyond Dreyfus. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):309-331.
    On a Dreyfusian account performers choke when they reflect upon and interfere with established routines of purely embodied expertise. This basic explanation of choking remains popular even today and apparently enjoys empirical support. Its driving insight can be understood through the lens of diverse philosophical visions of the embodied basis of expertise. These range from accounts of embodied cognition that are ultra conservative with respect to representational theories of cognition to those that are more radically embodied. This paper (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  29
    Gregory J. Feist (2013). The Nature and Nurture of Expertise: A Fourth Dimension. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):275-288.
    One formative idea behind the workshop on expertise in Berkeley in August of 2010 was to develop a viable “trading zone” of ideas, which is defined as a location “in which communities with a deep problem of communication manage to communicate” (Collins et al. 2010, p. 8). In the current case, the goal is to have a trading zone between philosophers, sociologists, and psychologists who communicate their ideas on expertise such that productive interdisciplinary collaboration results. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  9
    Fabrice Fernandez, Samuel Lézé & Hélène Strauss (2011). Comment évaluer une personne ? L'expertise judiciaire et ses usages moraux. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 1 (128-129):177-204.
    L’expertise psychiatrique est un instrument d’évaluation devenu indispensable dans le champ judiciaire tout en étant régulièrement contesté. Comment comprendre ce paradoxe apparent ? En décrivant, répond l’article, comment le droit formalise une partie de la morale autour de la catégorie de personne. À partir d’une étude de cas fondée sur une observation des usages de l’expertise dans une chambre correctionnelle, la première partie montre comment les acteurs de la justice évaluent l’instrument d’évaluation ; la seconde partie se penche (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  3
    Pierre-benoît Joly (2012). La fabrique de l’expertise scientifique : contribution des STS. Hermes 64:, [ p.].
    Cet article analyse la contribution des études des sciences et des techniques à la compréhension de la fabrique de l’expertise. L’originalité des STS tient à un postulat central : l’autonomie et la pureté de la science ne sont pas des propriétés intrinsèques de cette activité mais le résultat d’un travail de démarcation inscrit dans les pratiques des acteurs et dans les dispositifs institutionnels. Partant, les STS sont particulièrement bien positionnées pour analyser l’expertise comme « technologie de pouvoir », (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  1
    Nicolas Bommarito (2010). Rationally Self-Ascribed Anti-Expertise. Philosophical Studies 151 (3):413-419.
    I argue that self-ascribed anti-expertise, taking our own beliefs to be false, is not always irrational.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  7
    Jeanne Étiemble (2012). Historique de l’expertise collective à l’Inserm et enjeux actuels. Hermes 64:, [ p.].
    En répondant à des demandes émanant des institutions impliquées dans le domaine de la santé, l’Inserm prolonge sa mission de recherche par une activité de diffusion et de partage des connaissances et participe à la réflexion sur les implications collectives de cette recherche. Aujourd’hui intégrée à l’Institut de santé publique dans le cadre de l’Alliance nationale pour les sciences de la vie et de la santé , l’activité d’expertise collective participe au plan stratégique 2010-2015 de l’Inserm : « l’expérience (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  4
    Claire Sabbagh (2012). L’Expertise Scientifique À L’Inra : Comprendre les Enjeux de la Demande. Hermes 64:, [ p.].
    L’Inra a mis en place en 2002 une activité d’expertise scientifique collective dans ses domaines de compétences – agriculture, environnement, alimentation – pour répondre à des questions d’action publique, portées principalement par les ministères de l’agriculture et de l’écologie. C’est sur la base de l’expérience acquise qu’ont été formulés les principes qui encadrent l’exercice et qui figurent dans la charte de l’expertise scientifique à l’Inra, et qu’on été construites les procédures de conduite qui en garantissent la qualité. Cet (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000