Search results for 'Eyal Benvenisti' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Eyal Benvenisti (Tel Aviv University)
  1. Eyal Benvenisti (2009). Comment on Brian Langille: "What is International Labor Law For?". Law and Ethics of Human Rights 3 (1):83-86.score: 240.0
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  2. Nir Eyal (2005). ‘Perhaps the Most Important Primary Good’: Self-Respect and Rawls’s Principles of Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (2):195-219.score: 30.0
    The article begins by reconstructing the just distribution of the social bases of self-respect, a principle of justice that is covert in Rawls’s writing. I argue that, for Rawls, justice mandates that each social basis for self-respect be equalized (and, as a second priority, maximized). Curiously, for Rawls, that principle ranks higher than Rawls’s two more famous principles of justice - equal liberty and the difference principle. I then recall Rawls’s well-known confusion between self-respect and another form of self-appraisal, namely, (...)
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  3. Nir Eyal (2009). Is the Body Special? Review of Cécile Fabre, Whose Body is It Anyway? Justice and the Integrity of the Person. Utilitas 21 (2):233-245.score: 30.0
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  4. Nir Eyal (2006). Egalitarian Justice and Innocent Choice. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 2 (1).score: 30.0
    This article argues that, in its standard formulation, luck-egalitarianism is false. In particular, I show that disadvantages that result from perfectly free choice can constitute egalitarian injustice. I also propose a modified formulation of luck-egalitarianism that would withstand my criticism. One merit of the modification is that it helps us to reconcile widespread intuitions about distributive justice with equally widespread intuitions about punitive justice.
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  5. Nir Eyal & Samia A. Hurst (2008). Physician Brain Drain: Can Nothing Be Done? Public Health Ethics 1 (2):180-192.score: 30.0
    Next SectionAccess to medicines, vaccination and care in resource-poor settings is threatened by the emigration of physicians and other health workers. In entire regions of the developing world, low physician density exacerbates child and maternal mortality and hinders treatment of HIV/AIDS. This article invites philosophers to help identify ethical and effective responses to medical brain drain. It reviews existing proposals and their limitations. It makes a case that, in resource-poor countries, ’locally relevant medical training’—teaching primarily locally endemic diseases and practice (...)
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  6. Nir Eyal (2005). Justice, Luck, and Knowledge, by Susan L. Hurley. Harvard University Press, 2003. VIII + 341 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):164-171.score: 30.0
  7. Nir Eyal & Neema Sofaer (2010). The Diverse Ethics of Translational Research. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):19-30.score: 30.0
    Commentators on the ethics of translational research find it morally problematic. Types of translational research are said to involve questionable benefits, special risks, additional barriers to informed consent, and severe conflicts of interest. Translational research conducted on the global poor is thought to exploit them and increase international disparities. Some commentators support especially stringent ethical review. However, such concerns are grounded only in pre-approval translational research (now called T1 ). Whether or not T1 has these features, translational research beyond approval (...)
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  8. Ole Fritjof Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, Alex Voorhoeve, Bonah Chitah, Richard Cookson, Norman Daniels, Nir Eyal, Walter Flores, Axel Gosseries, Daniel Hausman, Samia Hurst, Lydia Kapiriri, Toby Ord, Shlomi Segall & Frehiwot Defaye (2014). Making Fair Choices on the Path to Universal Health Coverage. World Health Organisation.score: 30.0
    This report by the WHO Consultative Group on Equity and Universal Health Coverage addresses how countries can make fair progress towards the goal of universal coverage. It explains the relevant tradeoffs between different desirable ends and offers guidance on how to make these tradeoffs.
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  9. N. Eyal (2012). Why Treat Noncompliant Patients? Beyond the Decent Minimum Account. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):572-588.score: 30.0
    Patients’ medical conditions can result from their own avoidable risk taking. Some lung diseases result from avoidable smoking and some traffic accidents result from victims’ reckless driving. Although in many nonmedical areas we hold people responsible for taking risks they could avoid, it is normally harsh and inappropriate to deny patients care because they risked needing it. Why? A popular account is that protecting everyone’s "decent minimum," their basic needs, matters more than the benefits of holding people accountable. This account (...)
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  10. A. Bitton & N. Eyal (2011). Too Poor To Treat? The Complex Ethics of Cost-Effective Tobacco Policy in the Developing World. Public Health Ethics 4 (2):109-120.score: 30.0
    The majority of deaths due to tobacco in the twenty-first century will occur in the developing world, where over 80% of current tobacco users live. In November 2010 guidelines were adopted for implementing Article 14 of the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). The guidelines call on all countries to promote tobacco treatment programs. Nevertheless, some experts argue for a strict focus, at least in developing countries, on population-based measures such as taxes and indoor air laws, which (...)
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  11. Nir Eyal & Alex Voorhoeve (2011). Inequalities in HIV Care: Chances Versus Outcomes. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):42-44.score: 30.0
    We analyse three moral dilemmas involving resource allocation in care for HIV-positive patients. Ole Norheim and Kjell Arne Johansson have argued that these cases reveal a tension between egalitarian concerns and concerns for better population health. We argue, by contrast, that these cases reveal a tension between, on the one hand, a concern for equal *chances*, and, on the other hand, both a concern for better health and an egalitarian concern for equal *outcomes*. We conclude that, in these cases, there (...)
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  12. Neema Sofaer & Nir Eyal (2010). Translational Research Beyond Approval: A Two-Stage Ethics Review. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):W1-W3.score: 30.0
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  13. N. Eyal (forthcoming). Using Informed Consent to Save Trust. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100490.score: 30.0
    Increasingly, bioethicists defend informed consent as a safeguard for trust in caretakers and medical institutions. This paper discusses an ‘ideal type’ of that move. What I call the trust-promotion argument for informed consent states: 1. Social trust, especially trust in caretakers and medical institutions, is necessary so that, for example, people seek medical advice, comply with it, and participate in medical research. 2. Therefore, it is usually wrong to jeopardise that trust.3. Coercion, deception, manipulation and other violations of standard informed (...)
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  14. N. Eyal (2012). Reconciling Informed Consent with Prescription Drug Requirements. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):589-591.score: 30.0
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  15. Nir Eyal & Neema Sofaer (2010). Translational Research Beyond Approval: A Two-Stage Ethics Review. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):W1-W3.score: 30.0
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  16. Daniel Wikler & Nir Eyal (2013). Nudges and Noodges: The Ethics of Health Promotion—New York Style. Public Health Ethics 6 (3):pht033.score: 30.0
    Michael Bloomberg's three terms in New York City's mayoral office are coming to a close. His model of governance for public health influenced cities and governments around the world. What should we make of that model? This essay introduces a symposium in which ethicists Sarah Conly, Roger Brownsword and Alex Rajczi discuss that legacy.
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  17. Nir Eyal (forthcoming). Informed Consent, the Value of Trust, and Hedons. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101208.score: 30.0
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  18. Nir Eyal (forthcoming). Paternalism, French Fries and the Weak-Willed Witness. Journal of Medical Ethics.score: 30.0
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  19. Nir Eyal & Till Bärnighausen (2012). Precommitting to Serve the Underserved. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):23-34.score: 30.0
    In many countries worldwide, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, a shortage of physicians limits the provision of lifesaving interventions. One existing strategy to increase the number of physicians in areas of critical shortage is conditioning medical school scholarships on a precommitment to work in medically underserved areas later. Current practice is usually to demand only one year of service for each year of funded studies. We show the effectiveness of scholarships conditional on such precommitment for increasing physician supplies in underserved areas. (...)
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  20. Gil Eyal (1996). The Discursive Origins of Israeli Separatism: The Case of the Arab Village. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 25 (3):389-429.score: 30.0
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  21. Gil Eyal (2000). Anti-Politics and the Spirit of Capitalism: Dissidents, Monetarists, and the Czech Transition to Capitalism. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 29 (1):49-92.score: 30.0
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  22. Gil Eyal (2002). Dangerous Liaisons Between Military Intelligence and Middle Eastern Studies in Israel. Theory and Society 31 (5):653-693.score: 30.0
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  23. Nir Eyal & Axel Gosseries (2013). Obamacare and Conscientious Objection. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1):109-117.score: 30.0
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  24. Gil Eyal, Iván Szélényi & Eleanor Townsley (2003). On Irony: An Invitation to Neoclassical Sociology. Thesis Eleven 73 (1):5-41.score: 30.0
    This article proffers an invitation to neoclassical sociology. This is understood as a Habermasian reconstruction of the fundamental vision of the discipline as conceptualized by classical theorists, particularly Weber. Taking the cases of Eastern and Central Europe as a laboratory, we argue against the idea of a single, homogenizing globalizing logic. Currently and historically what we see instead is a remarkable diversity of capitalist forms and destinations. Neither sociological theories of networks and embeddedness nor economic models of rational action adequately (...)
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  25. Nir Eyal (2008). What is It Like to Be a Bird? : Wikler and Brock on the Ethics of Population Health. In Ronald Michael Green, Aine Donovan & Steven A. Jauss (eds.), Global Bioethics: Issues of Conscience for the Twenty-First Century. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  26. Gérard Bonnet, Mary Canning, Kai-Ming Cheng, Terry J. Crooks, Luis Crouch, Ori Eyal, Eva Forsberg, Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, Ratna Ghosh, Martin Gustafsson, Batia P. Horsky, Dan Inbar, Barbara M. Kehm, Stephen T. Kerr, Allan Luke, Ulf P. Lundgren, Robert W. McMeekin, Adam Nir, Peter Schrag, Hasan Simsek, Ryo Watanabe, Alison Wolf & Ali Yildirim (2010). Balancing Change and Tradition in Global Education Reform. R&L Education.score: 30.0
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  27. Dan Brock, Eric Cavallero, Norman Daniels, Nir Eyal, Iwao Hirose, Adi Koplovitz, Martin McIvor, David Miller, Ole Norheim & Daniel Schwartz (2011). Shlomi Segall. In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  28. Gil Eyal (ed.) (2012). Arbaʻ Hartsaʼot ʻal Teʼoryah Biḳortit. Ha-Ḳibuts Ha-MeʼUḥad.score: 30.0
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  29. Nir Eyal (2007). Poverty : Poverty-Reduction, Incentives, and the Brighter Side of False Needs. In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
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  30. N. Eyal (2008). Poverty Reduction and Equality with Strong Incentives: The Brighter Side of False Needs. In Ryberg Jesper & Petersen Thomas (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave. 130--141.score: 30.0
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  31. Gil Eyal & Eleanor Townsley (1995). The Social Composition of the Communist Nomenklatura: A Comparison of Russia, Poland, and Hungary. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 24 (5):723-750.score: 30.0
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  32. Ole Norheim, Samia Hurst, Nir Eyal & Dan Wikler (eds.) (forthcoming). Measuring and Evaluating Health Inequalities. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  33. S. Chapman & R. Mackenzie (2012). Can It Be Ethical to Apply Limited Resources in Low-Income Countries to Ineffective, Low-Reach Smoking Cessation Strategies? A Reply to Bitton and Eyal. Public Health Ethics 5 (1):29-37.score: 18.0
    Bitton and Eyal's lengthy critique of our article on unassisted cessation was premised on several straw-man arguments. These are corrected in our reply. It also confused the key concepts of efficacy and effectiveness in assessing the impact of cessation interventions and policies in real-world settings; ignored any consideration of reach (cost, consumer acceptability and accessibility) and failed to consider that clinical cessation interventions which fail more than they succeed also may ‘harm’ smokers by reducing agency. Our article addresses each (...)
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  34. Cécile Fabre (2009). Against Body Exceptionalism: A Reply to Eyal. Utilitas 21 (2):246-248.score: 15.0
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  35. Gregg Lambert (2008). Review of Eyal Peretz, Becoming Visionary: Brian de Palma's Cinematic Education of the Senses. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).score: 15.0
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  36. John Lynch & Monica Mitchell (2010). Community Engagement and the Ethics of Global, Translational Research: A Response to Sofaer and Eyal. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):37-38.score: 15.0
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  37. J. Flanigan (2012). Prescription Requirements: A Reply to Taylor, Martin and Eyal. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):591-592.score: 15.0
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  38. J. E. Cooper (forthcoming). The Political Philosophy of Zionism: Trading Jewish Words for a Hebraic Land by Eyal Chowers. Political Theory.score: 15.0
  39. E. Lourie (2002). City of Stone. The Hidden History of Jerusalem. By Meron Benvenisti. The European Legacy 7 (1):123-123.score: 15.0
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  40. Philip Webb (2008). Eyal Chowers . The Modern Self in the Labyrinth: Politics and the Entrapment Imagination (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005). Foucault Studies 5:148-152.score: 15.0
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  41. Edward Willat (2009). Eyal Peretz (2007) Becoming Visionary: Brian De Palma's Cinematic Education of the Senses. Film-Philosophy 12 (1).score: 15.0
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  42. Eyal Zamir & Barak Medina (2010). Law, Economics, and Morality. OUP USA.score: 6.0
    Law, Economics, and Morality examines the possibility of combining economic methodology and deontological morality through explicit and direct incorporation of moral constraints into economic models. Economic analysis of law is a powerful analytical methodology. However, as a purely consequentialist approach, which determines the desirability of acts and rules solely by assessing the goodness of their outcomes, standard cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is normatively objectionable. Moderate deontology prioritizes such values as autonomy, basic liberties, truth-telling, and promise-keeping over the promotion of good outcomes. (...)
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  43. Eyal Chowers (1998). Time in Zionism: The Life and Afterlife of a Temporal Revolution. Political Theory 26 (5):652-685.score: 3.0
  44. Philip M. Merikle & Eyal M. Reingold (1991). Comparing Direct (Explicit) to Indirect (Implicit) Measures to Study Unconscious Memory. Journal Of Experimental Psychology-Learning Memory And Cognition 17 (2):224-233.score: 3.0
  45. Eyal M. Reingold (2004). Unconscious Perception and the Classic Dissociation Paradigm: A New Angle? Perception and Psychophysics 66 (5):882-887.score: 3.0
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  46. Eyal Chowers (2002). The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and its Political Exile. Political Theory 30 (5):649-676.score: 3.0
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  47. Philip M. Merikle & Eyal M. Reingold (1992). Measuring Unconscious Perceptual Processes. In R.F. Bornstein & T.S. Pittman (eds.), Perception Without Awareness. New York: Guilford Press. 55-80.score: 3.0
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  48. Eyal M. Reingold (2004). Unconscious Perception: Assumptions and Interpretive Difficulties. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):117-122.score: 3.0
    Reingold and MerikleÕs (1988, 1990) critique of the classic dissociation paradigm identified several issues as inherent problems that severely undermine the utility of this paradigm. Erdelyi (2004) extending his prior analysis (Erdelyi, 1985, 1986) points out several additional factors that may complicate the interpretation of empirically obtained dissociations. The goal of the present manuscript is to further discuss some of these commonly neglected interpretive difficulties. Ó 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  49. Eyal Chowers (1999). The Marriage of Time and Identity: Kant, Benjamin and the Nation-State. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (3):57-80.score: 3.0
    The paper explores the role played by concepts of temporality in shaping the self's identity and its moral responsibility. This theme is examined in both Kant and Benjamin, two theorists who view the modern self as an essentially historical being. For Kant, teleological and uniform time shoulders the heightening of the self's universal attributes and the constant expansion of a moral community. The desired end is the establishment of an integrated and homogeneous human space, a cosmopolitan stage wherein history is (...)
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