1. Thomas S. Huddle & F. Amos Bailey (2012). Pacemaker Deactivation: Withdrawal of Support or Active Ending of Life? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):421-433.
    In spite of ethical analyses assimilating the palliative deactivation of pacemakers to commonly accepted withdrawings of life-sustaining therapy, many clinicians remain ethically uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life. Various reasons have been posited for this discomfort. Some cardiologists have suggested that reluctance to deactivate pacemakers may stem from a sense that the pacemaker has become part of the patient’s “self.” The authors suggest that Daniel Sulmasy is correct to contend that any such identification of the pacemaker is (...)
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  2. Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos (2008). Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:5.
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  3. Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos (2008). Death, Organ Transplantation and Medical Practice. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):5.
    A series of papers in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine (PEHM) have recently disputed whether non-heart beating organ donors are alive and whether non-heart beating organ donation (NHBD) contravenes the dead donor rule. Several authors who argue that NHBD involves harvesting organs from live patients appeal to.
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