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  1. Fred Feldman, Playing God: A Problem for Physician Assisted Suicide?
    The 1998 elections were held just about two weeks ago.1 All across the country, Americans went to the polls to vote for Senators, Representatives to the House, Governors, and local officials. In many states they were also given the opportunity to vote on a wide variety of ballot questions, and among these ballot questions several concerned physician assisted suicide.
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  2. Fred Feldman, “Death”.
    Reflection on death gives rise to a variety of philosophical questions. One of the deepest of these is a question about the nature of death. Typically, philosophers interpret this question as a call for an analysis, or definition, of the concept of death. Plato proposed to define death as the separation of soul from body. This definition is not acceptable to materialists, who think that there are no souls. It is also unacceptable to anyone who thinks that plants and lower (...)
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  3. Fred Feldman, Happiness and Subjective Desire Satisfaction: Wayne Davis's Theory of Happiness.
    There is a lively debate about the descriptive concept of happiness. What do we mean when we say (using the word to express this descriptive concept) that a person is “happy”? One prominent answer is subjective local desire satisfactionism. On this view, to be happy at a time is to believe, with respect to the things that you want to be true at that time, that they are true. Wayne Davis developed and defended an interesting and sophisticated version of this (...)
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  4. Fred Feldman, Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature (I, Iv, 6): Personal Identity.
    We are every moment intimately conscious of what we call our self; we feel its existence and its continuing to exist, and are certain - more even than any demonstration could make us - both of its perfect identity and of its simplicity. The strongest sensations and most violent emotions, instead of distracting us from this view ·of our self·, only focus it all the more intensely, making us think about how these sensations and emotions affect our self by bringing (...)
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  5. Fred Feldman, Happiness: Empirical Research; Philosophical Conclusions.
    In recent years there has been a tremendous surge of academic interest in happiness. It seems that just about every week there is an announcement of a new book on the nature of happiness, or the measurement of happiness2, or the causes of happiness, or the history of happiness3. Some of these books have been written by philosophers. Others have been written by psychologists, economists, sociologists, and other empirical scientists.4 The surge of interest in happiness is truly interdisciplinary.5 Everybody wants (...)
     
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  6. Fred Feldman, The Irrelevance of Equality Before the Law.
    Political activists drive around with bumper stickers proclaiming their commitment to equality. Perhaps the bumper sticker loudly asserts “=!” Oppressed people lament their lack of equality. Political philosophers contemplate equality and try to formulate general principles about it. In recent days, some advocates of marriage rights for same-sex couples argued for their view by claiming it’s just a matter of equality. Indeed, one of their advocacy websites uses the name ‘Equality’.1 They want equal rights. Everyone seems to take it for (...)
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  7. Fred Feldman, What is the Rational Care Theory of Welfare? A Comment on Stephen Darwall's Welfare and Rational Care.
    When we speak of a “good life” there are several different things we might mean. We might mean a morally good life. We might mean a life good for others, or good for the world in general. We might mean a life good in itself for the one who lives it. This last may also be described as the life high in individual welfare.
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  8. Ben Bradley, Fred Feldman & Jens Johansson (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. OUP USA.
    This Handbook consists of 21 new essays on the nature and value of death, the relevance of the metaphysics of time and personal identity for questions about death, the desirability of immortality, and the wrongness of killing.
     
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  9. Fred Feldman (2013). Brueckner and Fischer on the Evil of Death. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):309-317.
    Abstract According to the Deprivation Approach, the evil of death is to be explained by the fact that death deprives us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had lived longer. But the Deprivation Approach confronts a problem first discussed by Lucretius. Late birth seems to deprive us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had been born earlier. Yet no one is troubled by late birth. So it’s hard to see why we should be troubled (...)
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  10. Fred Feldman (2013). Death and the Disintegration of Personality. In Fred Feldman Ben Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. 60.
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  11. Fred Feldman (2012). True and Useful: On the Structure of a Two Level Normative Theory. Utilitas 24 (02):151-171.
    Act-utilitarianism and other theories in normative ethics confront the implementability problem: normal human agents, with normal human epistemic abilities, lack the information needed to use those theories directly for the selection of actions. Two Level Theories have been offered in reply. The theoretical level component states alleged necessary and sufficient conditions for moral rightness. That component is supposed to be true, but is not intended for practical use. It gives an account of objective obligation. The practical level component is offered (...)
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  12. Fred Feldman (2010). Life and Death. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
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  13. Fred Feldman (2010). On the Philosophical Implications of Empirical Research on Happiness. Social Research: An International Quarterly 77 (2):625-658.
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  14. Fred Feldman (2010). What is This Thing Called Happiness? Oxford University Press.
    Some puzzles about happiness -- Pt. I. Some things that happiness isn't. Sensory hedonism about happiness -- Kahneman's "objective happiness" -- Subjective local preferentism about happiness -- Whole life satisfaction concepts of happiness -- Pt. II. What happiness is. What is this thing called happiness? -- Attitudinal hedonism about happiness -- Eudaimonism -- The problem of inauthentic happiness -- Disgusting happiness -- Our authority over our own happiness -- Pt. III. Implications for the empirical study of happiness. Measuring happiness -- (...)
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  15. Fred Feldman (2008). Whole Life Satisfaction Concepts of Happiness. Theoria 74 (3):219-238.
    The most popular concepts of happiness among psychologists and philosophers nowadays are concepts of happiness according to which happiness is defined as "satisfaction with life as a whole". Such concepts are "Whole Life Satisfaction" (WLS) concepts of happiness. I show that there are hundreds of non-equivalent ways in which a WLS conception of happiness can be developed. However, every precise conception either requires actual satisfaction with life as a whole or requires hypothetical satisfaction with life as a whole. I show (...)
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  16. Fred Feldman (2007). Precis of Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties, and Plausiblity of Hedonism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (3):405 - 408.
  17. Fred Feldman (2007). Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (3):439 - 450.
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  18. Fred Feldman (2007). Review: Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (3):439 - 450.
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  19. Fred Feldman (2007). Reply to Elinor Mason and Alastair Norcross. Utilitas 19 (3):398-406.
    In comments originally presented at the ISUS conference at Dartmouth College in 2005, Elinor Mason and Alastair Norcross raised a number of objections to various things I said in Pleasure and the Good Life. One especially interesting objection concerns one of my central claims about the nature of pleasure. I distinguished between sensory pleasure and attitudinal pleasure. I said that a feeling counts as a sensory pleasure if the one who feels it takes intrinsic attitudinal pleasure in the fact that (...)
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  20. Fred Feldman (2006). Actual Utility, the Objection From Impracticality, and the Move to Expected Utility. Philosophical Studies 129 (1):49 - 79.
  21. Fred Feldman (2006). Review: What Is the Rational Care Theory of Welfare? [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 130 (3):585 - 601.
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  22. Fred Feldman (2006). Timmermann's New Paradox of Hedonism: Neither New nor Paradoxical. Analysis 66 (289):76–82.
    ...there can be cases in which we reject pleasure because there is too much of it. Sometimes we decide that pleasure is bad, or not worth having, not because of an extrinsic factor like moral, aesthetic etc. constraints but rather because one is experiencing enough pleasure to the point that more would in itself be undesirable. (2005: 144).
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  23. Fred Feldman (2006). What is the Rational Care Theory of Welfare? [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 130 (3):585 - 601.
  24. Fred Feldman (2006). Daniel Kahneman, Ed Diener, and Norbert Schwarz (Eds.) , Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology (New York: The Russell Sage Foundation, 1999), Pp. Xii + 593. Utilitas 18 (02):192-.
  25. F. Feldman (2005). Basic Intrinsic Value. In. In Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), Recent Work on Intrinsic Value. Springer. 379--400.
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  26. F. Feldman (2005). Hyperventilating About Intrinsic Value. In. In Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), Recent Work on Intrinsic Value. Springer. 45--58.
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  27. Fred Feldman (2005). The Open Question Argument: What It Isn't; and What It Is. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):22–43.
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  28. Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams (2004). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  29. Fred Feldman (2004). Cahn on Foot on Happiness. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):3–7.
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  30. Fred Feldman (2004). Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties and Plausibility of Hedonism. Clarendon Press.
    Fred Feldman's fascinating new book sets out to defend hedonism as a theory about the Good Life. He tries to show that, when carefully and charitably interpreted, certain forms of hedonism yield plausible evaluations of human lives. Feldman begins by explaining the question about the Good Life. As he understands it, the question is not about the morally good life or about the beneficial life. Rather, the question concerns the general features of the life that is good in itself for (...)
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  31. Fred Feldman (2003). Return to Twin Peaks: On the Intrinsic Moral Significance of Equality. In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Desert and Justice. Oxford University Press. 145--68.
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  32. F. Feldman, Value and the Good Life.
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  33. Fred Feldman (2002). Comments on Two of DePaul's Puzzles. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):636-639.
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  34. Fred Feldman (2002). The Good Life: A Defense of Attitudinal Hedonism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):604-628.
    The students and colleagues of Roderick Chisholm admired and respected Chisholm. Many were filled not only with admiration, but with affection and gratitude for Chisholm throughout the time we knew him. Even now that he is dead, we continue to wish him well. Under the circumstances, many of us probably think that that wish amounts to no more than this: we hope that things went well for him when he lived; we hope that he had a good life.
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  35. Fred Feldman (2002). Thomas L. Carson, Value and the Good Life:Value and the Good Life. Ethics 112 (3):604-607.
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  36. Fred Feldman (2001). Can an Act-Consequentialist Theory Be Agent Relative? DOUGLAS W. PORTMORE. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2).
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  37. Fred Feldman (2000). Basic Intrinsic Value. Philosophical Studies 99 (3):319-346.
    Hedonism: the view that (i) pleasure is the only thing that is intrinsically good, and (ii) pain is the only thing that is intrinsically bad; furthermore, the view that (iii) a complex thing such as a life, a possible world, or a total consequence of an action is intrinsically good iff it contains more pleasure than pain.
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  38. Fred Feldman (2000). The Termination Thesis. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):98–115.
    The Termination Thesis (or “TT”) is the view that people go out of existence when they die. Lots of philosophers seem to believe it. Epicurus, for example, apparently makes use of TT in his efforts to show that it is irrational to fear death. He says, “as long as we exist, death is not with us; but when death comes, then we do not exist.”1 Lucretius says pretty much the same thing, but in many more words and more poetically: “Death (...)
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  39. F. Feldman, Living High and Letting Die.
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  40. Fred Feldman (1999). Comments on Living High and Letting Die. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):195-201.
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  41. Fred Feldman (1999). Review: Comments on Living High and Letting Die. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):195 - 201.
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  42. Fred Feldman (1999). T6. Desert: Reconsideration of Some Received Wisdom. In Louis P. Pojman & Owen McLeod (eds.), What Do We Deserve?: A Reader on Justice and Desert. Oxford University Press. 140.
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  43. Fred Feldman (1998). Hyperventilating About Intrinsic Value. Journal of Ethics 2 (4):339-354.
    Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Brentano, Moore, and Chisholm have suggested marks or criteria of intrinsic goodness. I distinguish among eight of these. I focus in this paper on four: (a) unimprovability, (b) unqualifiedness, (c) dependence upon intrinsic natures, and (d) incorruptibility. I try to show that each of these is problematic in some way. I also try to show that they are not equivalent – they point toward distinct conceptions of intrinsic goodness. In the end it appears that none of them (...)
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  44. Fred Feldman (1998). Living High and Letting Die: Our Illusion of Innocence by Peter Unger (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996) Pp. XII + 186. [REVIEW] Noûs 32 (1):138–147.
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  45. Fred Feldman (1998). Living High and Letting Die: Our Illusion of Innocence by Peter Unger (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996) Pp. Xii+ 186. [REVIEW] Noûs 32 (1):138-147.
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  46. John P. Carriero, Peter J. Markie, Stephen Schiffer, Robert Delahunty, Frederick J. O'Toole, David M. Rosenthal, Fred Feldman, Anthony Kenny, Margaret D. Wilson, John Cottingham & Jonathan Bennett (1997). Descartes's Meditations: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  47. Fred Feldman (1997). On the Intrinsic Value of Pleasures. Ethics 107 (3):448-466.
  48. Fred Feldman (1997). On the Intrinsic Value of Pleasures* Fred Feldman. Ethics 107:448-466.
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  49. Fred Feldman (1997). Utilitarianism, Hedonism, and Desert: Essays in Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Fred Feldman is an important philosopher, who has made a substantial contribution to utilitarian moral philosophy. This collection of ten previously published essays plus a new introductory essay reveal the striking originality and unity of his views. Feldman's version of utilitarianism differs from traditional forms in that it evaluates behaviour by appeal to the values of accessible worlds. These worlds are in turn evaluated in terms of the amounts of pleasure they contain, but the conception of pleasure involved is a (...)
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