Search results for 'F. Ganglia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. F. Gregory Ashby, Benjamin O. Turner & Jon C. Horvitz (2010). Cortical and Basal Ganglia Contributions to Habit Learning and Automaticity. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (5):208.score: 18.0
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  2. Georg F. Striedter (2006). Précis of Principles of Brain Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):1-12.score: 12.0
    Brain evolution is a complex weave of species similarities and differences, bound by diverse rules and principles. This book is a detailed examination of these principles, using data from a wide array of vertebrates but minimizing technical details and terminology. It is written for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and more senior scientists who already know something about “the brain,” but want a deeper understanding of how diverse brains evolved. The book's central theme is that evolutionary changes in absolute brain size (...)
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  3. Danyllo F. de Oliveira, Roberta R. de Lemos & João R. M. de Oliveira (2013). Mutations at the SLC20A2 Gene and Brain Resilience in Families with Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (“Fahr's Disease”). [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
  4. Jos J. Adam & Ron F. Keulen (2004). FMRI Evidence for and Behavioral Evidence Against the Planning–Control Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):24-24.score: 6.0
    Consistent with the planning–control model, recent fMRI data reveal that the inferior parietal lobe, the frontal lobes, and the basal ganglia are involved in motor planning. Inconsistent with the planning–control model, however, recent behavioral data reveal a spatial repulsion effect, indicating that the visual context surrounding the target can sometimes influence the on-line control of goal-directed action.
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  5. Thomas F. Münte, Marcus Heldmann, Hermann Hinrichs, Josep Marco-Pallares, Ulrike M. Krämer, Volker Sturm & Hans-Jochen Heinze (2007). Nucleus Accumbens is Involved in Human Action Monitoring: Evidence From Invasive Electrophysiological Recordings. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:11.score: 6.0
    The Nucleus accumbens (Nacc) has been proposed to act as a limbic-motor interface. Here, using invasive intraoperative recordings in an awake patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease (OCD), we demonstrate that its activity is modulated by the quality of performance of the subject in a choice reaction time task designed to tap action monitoring processes. Action monitoring, that is, error detection and correction, is thought to be supported by a system involving the dopaminergic midbrain, the basal ganglia, and the medial (...)
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  6. H. L. Chapin, T. Zanto, K. J. Jantzen, S. J. Kelso, F. Steinberg & E. W. Large (2009). Neural Responses to Complex Auditory Rhythms: The Role of Attending. Frontiers in Psychology 1:224-224.score: 6.0
    The aim of this study was to explore the role of attention in pulse and meter perception using complex rhythms. We used a selective attention paradigm in which participants attended to either a complex auditory rhythm or a visually presented word list. Performance on a reproduction task was used to gauge whether participants were attending to the appropriate stimulus. We hypothesized that attention to complex rhythms – which contain no energy at the pulse frequency – would lead to activations in (...)
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  7. Antoin D. De Weijer, Rene C. W. Mandl, Iris Sommer, Matthijs Vink, Rene S. Kahn & Sebastiaan F. W. Neggers (2010). Human Fronto-Tectal and Fronto-Striatal-Tectal Pathways Activate Differently During Anti-Saccades. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:41.score: 6.0
    Almost all cortical areas in the vertebrate brain take part in recurrent connections through the subcortical basal ganglia (BG) nuclei, through parallel inhibitory and excitatory loops. It has been suggested that these circuits can modulate our reactions to external events such that appropriate reactions are chosen from many available options, thereby imposing volitional control over behavior. The saccade system is an excellent model system to study cortico-BG interactions. In this study two possible pathways were investigated that might regulate automaticity (...)
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